Cornish Cartoonist Residency Fellowship Offered; Today’s Daily Shouts By… Ali Solomon; Podcast Of Interest: Mort Gerberg; Video of Interest From The National Cartoonists Society; Fave Photo Of The Day: 3 NCS Award Winners

The Center For Cartoon Studies up in White River Junction, Vermont has announced its fourth Residency Fellowship.  According to the announcement:

This residency is made possible by former CCS board member, cartoonist Harry Bliss, whose work regularly appears in The New Yorker. “I want to attract the best cartoonists working today and create a residency that is a one-of-a-kind opportunity for storytellers who are pushing the boundaries of the medium,” Bliss said.

Link here for all the info, including a short promotional video.

The deadline for applying is August 15th!

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Today’s Daily Shouts…

…(Game of Thrones-ish, but of course) is by Ali Solomon, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018. 

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Podcast Of Interest: Mort Gerberg

Hot on the heels of Mort Gerberg’s exhibit in New York and various promotional venues for his latest book (pictured) is an interesting podcast with via Podbean.  

 

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NCSFest Video of Interest

There’s a little something called the NCSFEST (i.e., the National Cartoonists Society Festival) happening this weekend on the left coast.  Here’s a link to a video featuring several New Yorker colleagues, including Arnold Roth, Jason Chatfield, and Lars Kenseth (his scene at the 5:12 mark is a highlight, along with Mr. Roth’s affectionate Gold T-square moment at the very end of the video). 

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Fave Photo Of The Day

 Three fine folks with their NCS Awards (category indicated): l-r, Peter Kuper (Graphic Novels), Maria Scrivan (Greeting Cards), and Joe Dator (Gag Cartoons).  Congrats to all!

–photo from social media via Maria Scrivan

 

Ken Krimstein’s New York Times Book Review Sketchbook; Exhibit Of Interest: Felipe Galindo’s ‘Washington Takes Manhattan’; The Tilley Watch Online

Ken Krimstein’s New York Times Book Review Sketchbook

From The New York Times Book Review, May 12, 2019, “How Questioning Hannah Arendt Made Me Question Myself”

Mr. Krimstein on writing his latest book,The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt: A Tyranny of Truth Mr. Krimstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011.  Visit his website here.

 

 

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Exhibit of Interest: Felipe Galindo’s ‘Washington Takes Manhattan’

An exhibit of work at the Morris Jumel Mansion by Felipe Galindo (aka feggo), who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002. Visit his website here.

 

 

 

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A round-up of work by New Yorker cartoonists appearing on newyorker.com

The Daily Cartoon: Tim Hamilton, Peter Kuper, Tom Chitty, Avi Steinberg, and Teresa Burns Parkhurst. Not one, but two castle drawings this week!

To see all the above and more go here.

 

A Spill Push Back On Mankoff’s “It’s A Young Person’s Game”; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Peter Kuper

The below fraction of a lengthy interview, “Motoring With Bob Mankoff” on Peter McGraw’s May 2019 blog, caught my attention (to see the entire interview, go here):

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Peter McGraw: Tell me about your day, tell me about your creative process. How do you go about drawing cartoons and so on?

Bob Mankoff: “…I would get up and I would go to the drawing board. I used to spend hours and hours reading the papers, thinking, getting ideas and looking at ideas that I had done before. Taking a nap, drinking coffee, getting up and drinking coffee. I would have two days.

PM: Do you mean two days in a day?

BM: Two days in a day you would get ideas. There would be a period early in the morning where you would get ideas and work through them. My life at that time, my mind was always on for ideas constantly in the world. It was in a way an unpleasant and narrow experience. You have to work and enormously hard to get the ten or twenty ideas every week. The structure was that my conscious and unconscious mind was always in the back processing material. I’m sure standups are doing that also. I’m delighted I’m no longer doing that.

PM: Were you single at the time?

BM: I was single, married, single and married. I’ve been married three times. I’m sure this is true for stand-ups and other people where there’s so much of your mind is eaten up by this natural talent or propensity that you have that gets blown out of all proportion.

PM: You don’t seem terribly wistful about doing this.

BM: No, I’m not. First of all, I did what I think is good work. It’s a young person’s game. The idea that creative comic art goes on forever. It doesn’t. I always had other interests from the start. I was never singly looking at that. Fairly early, I got into The New Yorker in ’77. By 1984, I had burned out…”

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I bolded the stand-out section,“It’s a young person’s game. The idea that creative comic art goes on forever. It doesn’t.”   Hmmmn, reallyWe’re reminded every so often that nothing lasts forever; I’ve found, however, that cartoonists are most often young at heart — their comic creativity tends to last as long as they do, no matter their age (and I have to stick with New Yorker cartoonists here as I have zero knowledge of cartoonists in other fields). But you be the judge. Here’s a piece,”Looking On The Bright Side” — ever so slightly condensed — I wrote for The New Yorker‘s website in 2008.

 

Unlike baseball players or football players, who usually retire before their fortieth birthday, cartoonists tend to remain on the field for a very long time. For a while now, I’ve kept a black binder labeled “New Yorker Cartoonist Obits.” Look—I know that may seem a little dark, and maybe it is, but I had a childhood interest in reading obituaries, and when I grew up it seemed as natural as death itself that I begin collecting obituaries of New Yorker cartoonists.

What’s striking is the lengthy lives that many cartoonists have led, and how many of them were still working well into their eighth and ninth decades.

The average age of the last dozen New Yorker cartoonists who have spilled their final bottle of ink was 86.* I brighten when I think of the average age as 86, although I have plans to go on much longer than that—bypassing Mischa Richter at 90, Syd Hoff at 91, George Price at 93, and William Steig at 95.

Simple math tells me — if I’ve done it right—that when I reach the age of 86, it will be the year 2040; I’ll be working on my weekly batch of drawings, and looking forward to at least another decade of work. If I’m lucky.

*Curious if the average had changed, I’ve gone back this morning and looked at the ages of the more recent last dozen New Yorker cartoonists who passed away. The average age: 82.  The average lowered from 86 by the deaths of three colleagues who left us way too soon: Leo Cullum (age 68), Michael Crawford (70), and Jack Ziegler (74), all still very much in their prime and contributing to the magazine at the time of their passing.  Had we not lost those three artists, the average would’ve remained at 86. 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Politics and privilege, from Peter Kuper, whose website can be found here.

Auction Of Interest: Press Forward Auction Includes Cartoonists Galore!

News of an auction of cartoon art (both original work and prints) to support Press Forward. According to their website PF is an independent initiative whose mission is to change culture in newsrooms.

Also to be auctioned are a number of fun experiences including this:

 Behind the Scenes Experience with New Yorker Editor David Remnick and Cartoon Editor, Emma Allen

Some of the work up for auction is already online, and can be seen here. More art will be available online prior to the live auction/party in Washington, D.C., May 8th.  The Spill will update as art is added online.

Here’s the invite to the event. Link here to RSVP.

Below:  a list of the artists whose work is up for grabs:

 

New Yorker cartoonists:

Kim Warp

Amy Hwang

Liza Donnelly

Michael Maslin

Emily Flake

Peter Kuper

Christopher Weyant  

 

New Yorker cover artists:

Barry Blitt  

John Cuneo  

 

Pulitzer Prize winner Editorial Cartoonists:

Signe Wilkinson  (the first woman to win Pulitzer) (Philadelphia Daily News)

Ann Telnaes  (The Washington Post)

Jim Morin (independent)

Matt Wuerker (Politico)

Joel Pett (The Lexington Herald-Leader)

 

Editorial Cartoonists:

Ed Hall (independent)

Rob Rogers (independent)

Jen Sorenson  (Daily Kos)

Chip Bok (Akron Beacon Journal)

Keith Knight (syndicated)

Tom Toles  (The Washington Post)

Pat Bagley (The Salt Lake Tribune)

Jake Tapper (CNN / State of the Cartoonian)

Jeff Danziger (independent)

Sage Stossel (The Atlantic)

Lisa Benson  (independent)

 

More MoCCA Today (With Photos) & “My First MoCCA”; David Sipress On A 1969 Harvard Protest

More MoCCA Today

At least three New Yorker cartoonist events scheduled today: Liana Finck in conversation with Gabrielle Bell; a “spotlight” on Mark Alan Stamaty; Emily Flake as part of a panel, “Narratives On Motherhood”; cover artist Ivan Brunetti in a panel on “Comics and the Teaching Artist” (right: Ms. Bell and Ms. Finck today. Courtesy of Stephen Nadler).

And more photos from today (all courtesy of Liza Donnelly, with the exception of the Mark Alan Stamaty photo.  That’s another courtesy of Stephen Nadler):

Top row, l-r: Peter Kuper, Felipe Galindo, Mark Parisi, Ellis Rosen.

Middle row: Arnold Roth & Caroline Roth, Liza Donnelly, Keith Knight.

Bottom: Mark Alan Stamaty (l), and Bill Kartalopoulos, who, among other things, is MoCCA’s Programming Director, and Series Editor for The Best American Comics series. 

My First MoCCA:  A Personal Take

Judging by the scene I dove into at yesterday’s MoCCA Fest, the appetite for, and practice of comics and cartoons is booming. The place (the Metropolitan West on West 46th Street) was at capacity, loud and energized. I took in the must-see Cartooning For Peace exhibit on the second floor (curated by The New Yorker cartoonist, Liza Donnelly) then immediately ran into Dick Buchanan (who for quite some time has been sharing his voluminous cartoon file via Mike Lynch’s site). Mr. Buchanan had told me earlier in the week  that he’d be at the fest, and would bring along a copy of a book I’d never seen before:  Bernard Wiseman’s Cartoon Countdown (published in 1959). Mr. Wiseman contributed 197 cartoons to The New Yorker, from April 19, 1947 – June 11. 1960.

In the pr copy on the first page:

This is the first book of cartoons devoted exclusively  to he Conquest of Space. Let the Russians Match That! 

(to the right: The Cartooning For Peace Exhibit)

With  thanks to Mr. Buchanan for Cartoon Countdown, it was on to a tour of the fest.

 

  The illustrator Tom Bloom was seen engaged in conversation with an exhibitor, the illustrator/educator, Steve Guernaccia blew by (he’s hard to miss, sartorially). The multitude of people, of tables laden with products bearing graphic images, posters, cards, etc., etc., was astounding. Along with me on the tour was one of my co-panelists, Danny Shanahan.  We were moving along at a good pace with the flow of the crowd when a familiar book cover on the New York Review Comics table got our attention: Saul Steinberg’s recently reissued Labyrinth (also on the table were a number of Maira Kalaman titles).  I bet Steinberg would’ve enjoyed the scene passing by his book.

Closing in on the slotted time for our panel with Mort Gerberg, we headed over to Ink48 on 11th Avenue, where the panels took place. Ran into Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery  who reminded us that Mark Alan Stamaty was signing his anniversary edition of MacDoodle Street.

Co-panelist Bob Eckstein awaited us in the Garamond Room, where we were soon joined by Marisa Acocella, and the man of the hour, Mort Gerberg. Spotted in our audience were New Yorker contributors,  R. Sikoryak, and Sophia Warren, as well as friend to all comics creators, Karen Greene of Columbia University. Below photos of the panel courtesy of Mr. Nadler (l-r, Danny Shanahan, Bob Eckstein, myself, Marisa Acocella, and Mr. Gerberg).

One of the fun things to come out of paneling with colleagues is the unexpected nugget or two of New Yorker history. As he discussed selling his first cartoon to The New Yorker back in 1965 , Mr. Gerberg told us — and this is something I had never heard, and didn’t realize was even possible — that he had talked the then art editor, James Geraghty into allowing what was supposed to be a bought idea of Mr. Gerberg’s to become a bought drawing. New Yorker history buffs know that it was routine at the magazine back then to buy ideas and give them to established cartoonists. It’s quite a thing that Mr. Gerberg, with his first sale to the magazine, was not only able to buck that well-entrenched system, but to deliver the full page below (published in October 20,1965).

  After our panel concluded we panelists stayed in the same room to attend the next panel,  “Professional Development 101: Art Directors Roundtable.” How could we not –it included our very own cartoon editor, Emma Allen. As we moved into the audience we spotted fellow colleagues, Kendra Allenby, Tracey Berglund, and cartoonist, Marc Bilgrey. Ms. Allen was joined by Matt Lubchansky (of The Nib), Alexandra Zsigmond (formerly The New York Times), Will Varner (formerly Buzzfeed), and artist/educator, Viktor Koen, who moderated.  The “101” in the panel title was accurate — we heard what the scene was like for today’s beginning illustrator/artists trying to break in. One piece of advice from Ms. Allen that stood out for me:  something that would make her laugh while looking at [written and drawn] humor for four hours in a day, had an excellent shot.

By the way, the place was packed.

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David Sipress On A Harvard Protest In 1969

Mr. Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998, has a Personal History piece on newyorker.com: “Fake News, 1969: My Slightly Infamous Role In The Harvard Antiwar Protests”