Peter Arno, seriously.

  Of the thirty-six Peter Arno drawings that appeared in The New Yorker in 1939, one should be noted as entirely different from what the readership had come to expect from his pen.  The captionless drawing of October 7th, described in The New Yorker’s records as: “Air Squadron flying over a cemetery in France” is a somber piece unlike anything

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James Stevenson’s Secret Job at The New Yorker

          If you pick up a copy of veteran New Yorker cartoonist, cover artist, and Talk of the Town contributor James Stevenson’s latest book, The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, you’ll find a section wherein Mr. Stevenson recounts his “summer office boy” job at The New Yorker back in 1947, and mentions as well

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An Arno Easter Cover, and more…

From Stephen Nadler’s fun blog, attemptedbloggery, March 30, 2013, “Peter Arno’s Easter Parade” — Mr. Nadler takes us back to 1931 and the era of top hats on Fifth Avenue. And… On The New Yorker’s website there’s a look at more recent (1993 – 2010) Easter covers that have adorned the magazine.

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