Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Elisabeth McNair; Surreal McCoy’s “Wolf Of Baghdad”At Shrewsbury Int’l Cartoon Festival; Today’s Daily Shouts By…Julia Wertz; Cooper Hewitt’s Steinberg’s Spot The Difference; Dick Buchanan’s Perry Barlow File

Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Kids, parents, computers…by Elisabeth McNair.  Ms. McNair began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.  Visit her website here.

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Surreal McCoy’s “Wolf Of Baghdad” At Shrewsbury Int’l Cartoon Festival

All the info here on the film and the festival.

Ms. McCoy (Carol Isaacs) began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.  Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts by…Julia Wertz

“Conversations with Ma: Making Wreaths and Having Kids” by Julia Wertz. Ms. Wertz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.   Visit her website here.

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Cooper Hewitt’s Steinberg Spot the Difference

Something fun.  From Cooper Hewitt, April 24, 2019, “Spot the Difference: Steinberg Edition”

Here’s Steinberg’s Spill A-Z entry:

Saul Steinberg Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

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Dick Buchanan’s Perry Barlow File

Another great post from Dick Buchanan via Mike Lynch’s blog.  This time it’s “Perry Barlow 1932- 1961”

(Above: a Barlow from Collier’s, January 21, 1955).

From Mr. Barlow’s Spill A-Z entry:

Perry Barlow ( photo above from barlowgeneology.com) Born 1892, McKinney, Texas. Died, Westport, Connecticut, December 26,1977. New Yorker work: 1926 -1974, with 1,574 drawings and 135 covers. According to Barlow’s obit in The New York Times (Dec. 27, 1977) William Shawn called him “one of the gentlest and most humane of all comic artists…he was also one of our three or four most prolific people.” In the same piece, James Geraghty (The New Yorker’s Art editor from 1939 thru 1973) said “he often tried to interest Mr. Barlow in publishing a book of his drawings ‘but he was halfhearted about it.’” Mr. Barlow’s wife, Dorothy Hope Smith, played a role in his work: she colored-in his covers because her husband was partly color blind.

Cartoons Holding “A Mirror Up to the War Effort”: The New Yorker War Album… & More

The New Yorker War Album, published in 1942, was the very first themed Album of the magazine’s cartoons. Peter Arno’s cover from the issue of February 28, 1942 was selected as the cover.  As so often the case for the Album series an Arno drawing led off the collection (“Of course if they don’t bomb Sutton Place, I’m going to look like a damn fool.”)

There is no introduction to the work — only the flap copy shown below. “Spot” artists (Susanne Suba being an example) are credited along with the cartoonists.

The back cover, mostly a green field, has a small Alan Dunn caption-less drawing floating in the center:

The War Album follows in line with all the previous Albums in size, quality of layout, and of course, quality of drawings.  The bottom line with these Albums: if you see one, buy it.

Below, a spread with a Roberta MacDonald multi-panel across the top, a Barbara Shermund drawing lower left and a Perry Barlow lower right.

Along with the War Album the New Yorker produced a number of special publications during the war:

The Pony Editions.

These were smaller versions of the magazine, 6″ x 9″, given free to servicemen and servicewomen. These were not exact duplicates of the regular editions of the magazine — they carried no advertising and editorial content was juggled. One striking difference: the back cover was a full page cartoon (as shown above). According to Thomas Kunkel in his Ross biography Genius In Disguise, these editions began appearing in September of 1943 and were discontinued shortly after the end of the war.

The New Yorker War Cartoons.

Paperback, and, like the Pony Editions, 6″ x 9″.  Published in 1945, with an introduction by E.J. Kahn, Jr.. Cartoons with Talk pieces throughout.

The New Yorker Cartoons with The Talk of the Town

Also published in 1945 (and also 6″ x 9″)  Hardcover and softcover editions. An introduction by Russell Maloney.

I like Mr. Maloney’s introduction so much I’m showing a portion below (the whole piece can be found here):

Armed Services Editions.

Judging by the list of available titles provided at the end of each edition there were close to a thousand titles issued during the war (a wide variety, from Mark Twain to Thackeray).  I don’t have a complete list so I’m in the dark about which New Yorker-related  titles were issued other the one shown here, The Thurber Carnival, The New Yorker’s Baedeker, The New Yorker Profiles, and Thurber’s Let Your Mind Alone. (If anyone knows of more please let me know).  These special publications were very small: 3 3/4″ x 5 1/2″ — small enough to fit in a soldier’s pocket.  There was a Bill Maudlin Armed Services title published (it’s #822, Up Front). Technically, he was a New Yorker cartoonist with one drawing published,  April 1, 1950.  But that appeared five years after Up Front was published in 1945.  Splitting hairs, I know.  

 

 

 

Mommy Kisses Santa Claus: The 1942 New Yorker Album

On this foggy Christmas Eve, here’s the tenth New Yorker Album of drawings, titled The 1942 New Yorker Album , with a Perry Barlow New Yorker magazine cover from December 23, 1939 used as its cover (there’d be another Album in 1942: The New Yorker War Album —  we’ll get to that another Sunday).  Perry Barlow, the cover artist, was one of the most prolific of the magazine’s contributors, and possibly one of its most overlooked. The New Yorker published well over a thousand of his cartoons, and one hundred and thirty-four covers.  Lee Lorenz, said of Mr. Barlow: “his drawings were deceptively casual, brought a gentle urbanity to our pages and helped establish the tone of the fledgling magazine…He had a marvelous eye for the telling gesture, and, although he returned to certain favorite situations again and again, he never repeated a face.”   Mr. Lorenz also noted that Mr. Barlow was partly color-blind and depended on his wife to do the coloring for his covers.

The Album opens with a full page Arno (of course!) “What is the specialty here?” and closes with a full page Charles Addams, “Well, here’s where I say good night.” — both of a certain pre-war time, about to evaporate.  Arno’s drawing takes place in a table-cloth nightclub (think the “Thin Man” movies), with a line of scantily clad chorus girls dominating the page.  The gentlemen shown are wearing tuxes.  In the Addams drawing the gentleman’s wearing evening dress, including a top hat.

Between the Arno and the Addams are the by now (by now to constant New Yorker readers) a very familiar crew of cartoonists. The inside flap shown below doesn’t list every contributor, but you’re sure to see names that would be carved in the New Yorker Cartoonist Hall of Fame, if we had one.

There’s no introduction in the Album, just the goods.  Included are a number of hits on Nazis (Rea Irvin’s full page titled drawing:  A Nazi History of the World: The Non-Aryans Are Expelled From the Garden of Eden for example), and examples of cartoonists dealing with the war-time culture here at home (example: Peter Arno’s famous, “Well, back to the old drawing board” — also a full page). 

For a tenth Album of drawings you might think there was a lesser amount of energy coming off these cartoons.  Just the opposite. Pick up a copy of the 1942 Album and settle in with it — you’ll find yourself in a cartoon gold mine. 

 

 

The Women of The NY Comedy Fest Live-Drawn by Liza Donnelly; Cartoons For Victory Reviewed; Sipress Pencilled

LD Live Drawing Comedy FestFrom newyorker.com, November 18, 2015, Liza Donnelly‘s  “Live-Drawing the Women of the New York Comedy Festival”  — see the piece here

[left: Ms. Donnelly’s drawing of Yamaneika Saunders]

Liza Donnelly’s website.

 

 

 

 

 

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Here’s a review via Animation Scoop of the brand new Cartoons For Victory by Warren Bernard (Executive Director of The Small Press Expo and co-author of Eisner nominated Drawing Power).

This a large format hard cover book, filled with beautifully reproduced art.  A good number of New Yorker artists are represented including Charles Addams, Gardner Rea, Gregory d’Alessio, Gluyas Williams, Garrett Price, Helen Hokinson, John M. Price, Louis Jamme, Barbara Shermund, Perry Barlow, and more.

 

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tumblr_inline_nxk6i1JlKG1sj0qh6_500David Sipress discusses his tools of the trade and more on Jane Mattimoe’s A Case For Pencils blog.  See it here.

“The New Yorker Family Reunion Panel” at Westport Historical Society; Liana Finck signing A Bintel Brief at MoCCA Arts Fest; Bob Mankoff Book Tour Rolls On

NY-albums

“The New Yorker Family Reunion Panel” featuring children of Golden Age New Yorker artists, Alice Harvey, Perry Barlow, Edna Eicke, Arthur Getz and Whitney Darrow, Jr., Saturday, April 12th at The Westport Historical Society. Also on the panel: the children of James Geraghty, the magazine’s Art Editor from 1939 through 1973.  You can find examples of work by the artists on The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site.

 

 

 

 

 

(photo of The New Yorker Albums by Michael Maslin)

 

 

and…

A Bintel Brief

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’d like to secure a copy of Liana Finck‘s soon-to-be-released book, A Bintel Brief, she’ll be at the MoCCA Arts Fest this weekend signing copies.

 

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and…

bob

Bob Mankoff, The New Yorker‘s current Cartoon Editor is on the road promoting his new book, How About Never — Is Never Good for You?  This latest report comes from The Princeton Packet.