The Weekend Spill: The Tilley Watch Online, May 18-22, 2020; A New Yorker State Of Mind Goes Deep Into The Issue Of May 2, 1931; Attempted Bloggery Shows Us Peter Arno’s Alemite Ads; Some Content Released For The Upcoming Cartoon Collection “All’s Fair In Love & War”

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The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of May 18-22, 2020

An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Jeremy Nguyen, David Sipress, Paul Noth, Ellis Rosen, Ali Solomon

Daily Shouts: Jason Chatfield (& Ethan Hall)

…and:

From the Culture Desk: Emily Flake’s “My Stupid Quarantine Body”

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Up and Inside”  & “Theatre Of The Absurd”

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A New Yorker State Of Mind Goes Deep Into The Issue Of May 2, 1931

One of the Spill‘s fave sites really goes to town with this particular installment. If you want to be carried away from 2020 for a bit, take a look.

Cover by Theodore Haupt, one of forty-four for the magazine.

As a sort of extra add-on to the NYSoM’s  “Tete-a-tete” section concerning Mr. Pulitzer’s fountain, here’s an Oct. 10, 2014 Spill entry

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Attempted Bloggery Shows Us Peter Arno’s Alemite Ads

Here’s a fun post from another Spill fave blog.  Attempted Bloggery looks at the Peter Arno Alemite campaign. See it all here.

[and wow! — just look at Arno’s composition in the ad shown above]

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Some Content Released For The Upcoming Cartoon Collection “All’s Fair In Love & War”

If you check out Amazon’s listing for the Bob Eckstein edited All’s Fair In Love & War (Princeton Architectural Press), you’ll be able to see 21 of the collected cartoons if you click on “Look Inside” and an additional 18 (with some duplications from “Look Inside”) if you click on the  array  of thumbnail cartoons shown below the cover.

Also shown on “Look Inside” is Mr. Eckstein’s introduction and the complete list of contributors. The book, the third in the Ultimate Cartoon Book series, comes out October 20th of this year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Revisiting Joe Dator’s Classic “How We Do It”; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Revisiting Joe Dator’s Classic “How We Do It”

Whenever I allow myself a moment to think about what it is I do for a living and the terrific people I share this weird occupation with, I think of Joe Dator’s fabulous New Yorker piece from the issue of September 24, 2012. It is one of my all-time favorite Joe Dator drawings. Additionally, it’s one of my favorite contemporary New Yorker graphic pieces. Its good cheer has never failed me. My thanks to Mr. Dator for permission to run it here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Paul Noth with an Animal Crossing court. Mr. Noth has been contributing to The New Yorker since  2004. Visit his website here.

 

Thurber Thursday; Book On The Horizon: Tom Toro’s First Kids Book; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist: Olivia de Recat…And Yesterday’s: Sara Lautman

Thurber Thursday

Above are all the (specifically) Thurber reference books in the Spill cartoon library. Thurber of course makes appearances in numerous New Yorker-centric books, such as Ross And The New Yorker; Genius In Disguise; Ross, The New Yorker & Me, etc., etc.), but these are the core group examining Thurber’s life.

Of the above, I use three on a regular basis: Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography, Burton Bernstein’s Thurber: A Biography, and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times. Of the remaining titles, Helen Thurber & Edward Weeks’ Selected Letter of James Thurber has long been a favorite. The more recent volume of letters by Harrison Kinney & Rosemary Thurber is almost (for me) like Volume 2 to Mr. Kinney’s massive Thurber biography. It’s been incredibly helpful filling in some admittedly weedsy questions I come up with.

The book on the far left is part of Twayne’s United States Author Series (Thurber’s is #62). While this is a good bare-bones read, I’ve found other titles in the series helpful for biographical info needed on others in The New Yorkersphere. Peter DeVries volume is an example ((#448). Another is Philip Wylie’s (#285) — it came in handy during my Peter Arno research.

All of these books are within an arm’s reach from my work table on the chance there’s a Thurber emergency.

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News from Tom Toro of his first kids book, out May 12th, from Little, Brown.

This from the publisher:

Two children bring home a pet porcupine, but they can only keep her if she’s house-trained! After a whirlwind of increasingly zany approaches, the kids learn that sometimes the best way to solve a problem is to ask nicely. With Tom’s wit and dynamic artwork, this delightful story about learning to pee will bring joy and heart to young readers.

Here’s Mr. Toro’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Tom Toro (self portrait  & bio courtesy of Mr. Toro) Born in Richmond, California on May 22, 1982. Graduated valedictorian from El Cerrito High School and matriculated to Yale. Edited cartoons for The Yale Herald and won a national championship in lightweight rowing in 2002, elected captain of the rowing team in 2004. Earned a degree cum laude in art history specializing in cinema studies. Attended NYU Film School for two years, shooting shorts and features that went to Sundance, Tribeca and Cannes. Began submitting cartoons to The New Yorker in 2007, first got published in 2010 – after the 610th try. Also a writer of literary fiction, short stories, screenplays and children’s picture books of the “unpublished” variety [Ed.: until now!]. New Yorker work: May 24, 2010 – . Visit his website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Paul Noth on time travel in the time of Trump.

Mr. Noth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2004. Visit his website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist…

From Olivia de Recat, “My New Friends!”

— Ms. de Recat has been contributing her cartoons to The New Yorker since February of 2018. Visit her website here.

 

…and Yesterday’s 

From Sara Lautman, “P.S.A. Posters For Living Indoors”

— Ms. Lautman has been contributing to The New Yorker since March of 2016. Visit her website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of March 30, 2020; More Spills…

Note: As of 10:00am this Monday morning the magazine’s digital issue has not yet been posted, so, for now, I’m relying on what’s available on other areas of newyorker.com.

Update: Digital issue posted this evening.

The Cover: as mentioned here last Friday, the new issue’s cover (above) was early released.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons: As might be expected, several of this week’s eleven cartoons are current event-centric.  Roz Chast’s and Paul Noth’s the most reflective, with Sofia Warren’s very much in the vicinity.  If there’s a non-exclusive theme running throughout, it is domesticity: Lars Kenseth’s couple in the kitchen, Zach Kanin’s dad in the living room, a neighbor showing up to borrow a lot of sugar, Emily Flake’s couple at home in the hallway, and a dad in bed, with little patience to listen to his kid’s dream. Kim Warp’s way out there drawing bucks the surely coincidental at-home theme.

All of the cartoons above can be seen here via a slideshow on newyorker.com

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s iconic masthead (below) is still hidden away, a redraw in its place since the Spring of 2017. Read about it here.

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…Today’s Daily Cartoon: Maddie Dai on staying in.

…a Daily Shouts by Emily Flake: “Adages For The Age Of Quarantine.”

…From Comics DC, March 22, 2020: “Was Emily Richards The First Black Female New Yorker Cartoonist in 2004?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Tilleys They Are A-Changin’… The New Yorker’s 95th Anniversary Issue, February 17, 2020

The cover above, by Rea Irvin, appeared on the very first issue of The New Yorker — thereafter it showed up for every anniversary issue from 1926 through 1993. If you happen to have a bunch of those anniversary issues and fan them out on your floor — such as I did back in 2008 — they look pretty neat:

In 1994, Tina Brown broke the string of Rea Irvin Tilleys by running Robert Crumb’s “Elvis Tilley.”  Since 1994 Mr. Irvin’s original cover (with slight alterations from time-to-time) has been seen in the years 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2009. It was last seen 2011.

In 1995, Irvin’s Tilley appeared swimming in gold to celebrate the magazine’s 75th anniversary. When the original Tilley hasn’t appeared he’s been replaced by look-a-likes, or take-offs, or homages, or what-have-yous. Sometimes Tilley has been left off/left out altogether. On this week’s 95th anniversary issue, there is, what’s described on the Table of Contents, an “origin” cover by Barry Blitt (who also supplied the Tilley-ish spot drawings this week).

My instinct to gather has led to the below gallery of substitute anniversary covers, from Crumb to Blitt. Included are the covers that have no Tilley reference whatsoever but appeared in the anniversary slot.

Above: the non-Tilley anniversary cover artists: R. Crumb (1994), R.O. Blechman (1996), Art Spiegelman (1997), Michael Roberts (1998), Edward Sorel 1999), William Wegman 2000), Chris Ware (2005), Seth (2008), Chris Ware (2010), Bruce McCall (2012), Simon Greiner (2013) Jorge Colombo (2014), Barry Blitt (2015), Liniers (2016), John W. Tomac (2017), Malika Favre (2018), Kadir Nelson (2019), Barry Blitt (2020)

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

 Zoe Si is the first newbie of 2020. She is the fifty-fourth new cartoonist brought into the magazine’s stable since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

Fourteen cartoons in this issue (fifteen cartoonists as Emily Flake provided a “Sketchpad”), with two cartoon gods on board: Edward Koren and George Booth.  With Valentine’s Day approaching, cartoon love is in the issue, including a great cupid cartoon by Paul Noth and a fab love & justice drawing by Peter Vey.  A Spill round of applause for those as well as Bruce Eric Kaplan’s splendid dinner party drawing.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: this being a big birthday issue, I had low high hopes for a return of Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead (shown below).  Alas, the spring of 2017 re-draw is still in place. Read about the original and its replacement here.