Who Wrote What In The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons

Scattered through the forthcoming New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons (out October 2nd) are a number of what are called commentaries (an example: “Banana Peels”). These are unsigned, but a blanket credit for assisting in the writing is given in the introduction to cartoonists Emily Flake, Pat Byrnes, Tom Toro, Paul Karasik, and the New Yorker’s Assistant Cartoon Editor, Colin Stokes [full disclosure: I was asked to audition for the opportunity to write a number of these commentaries. I declined to audition after learning my efforts, if used, would appear uncredited].

The Spill loves giving credit where credit is due, and in that spirit I”m listing the work contributed by three of the above unsigned contributors.  Paul Karasik posted some of his contributions on Facebook (I’m attempting to track down the rest). Tom Toro and Pat Byrnes responded to my request for theirs. Should Emily Flake and Colin Stokes respond, I’ll list their contributions as well.

One quibble with these commentaries: they are not indexed; the reader must hunt for them. 

Tom Toro contributed the following:

Automation, Hollywood. Internet, Inventions, Judges, Knitting, Modern Art, Noah’s Ark, Nudism, Real Estate, Valentines

 
Pat Byrnes contributed these:
 
Heaven & Hell, Boxing, Job Interviews, Lawyers, Lighthouses, Meet the Author, Operations, Report Cards, Royalty, Sex, The Thinker
 
Paul Karasik’s contributions:
 
Advertising, Censorship, Evolution, Snowmen, Superheroes, Trojan Horse, Wall Street, Zombies.
 
Emily Flake [list in progress]:
 
Cavemen & -Women…
 
Uncredited as of yet: Banana Peels, Desert Island, Dentistry, Easter Island, Fortune Teller, Famous Painters & Painting, Grim Reaper, Google, King Kong, Life Rafts, Maternity Ward, Owls, Psychiatrists, Pirates, Quicksand,, UFOs, Wise Man On Mountain, X-Rays, Yoga.
 
[Updated: 8:00 pm, Sunday]

The Tilley Watch Online: The Week of July 16-20, 2018; Cartoon Companion Rates Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Eisner Congrats; Steinberg, Natty Dresser

Another very Trumpian week (but of course!) for the Daily Cartoon, with contributions by Brendan Loper (twice), Mary Lawton, Ellis Rosen, and Lars Kenseth

And on the Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists were David Sipress, and a group effort from Sharon Levy, Olivia de Recat, and the aforementioned  Mr. Kenseth

You can see all of the above, and more on newyorker.com.

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Cartoon Companion Rates Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC’s “Max” and “Simon” return with their trademark cartoon ratings. The boys focus on the work in the issue of July 23, 2018. Seth Fleishman is awarded the CC‘s coveted Top Toon blue ribbon. Read it all here.

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Eisner Congrats

The Eisner Award winners were announced last night. Congrats to all the nominated folks, with an extra woo-hoo to New Yorker cartoonists, Shannon Wheeler and Paul Karasik

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Mouly & Spiegelman on Steinberg

From newyorker.com‘s Culture Desk, “Saul Steinberg: On The Hyphen Between High And Low”

— this brief piece in conjunction with a Steinberg exhibit at The Drawing Room.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The (double) New Yorker Issue of July 9 & 16, 2018

A dog in a flotation device on a very watery cover for a double issue in early-to-mid July. The artist Mark Ulriksen talks about his creation here.  My eye wants me to believe that Mr. Ulriksen’s doggie is floating in the air above the surface of marbeilized water.

A delayed Monday Tilley Watch as the digital issue has not yet turned over to July 9th & 16th (it’s still stuck on the issue of July 2nd). The Monday Watch came about because I thought it might be fun taking a look at the cartoons in situ. Without the digital issue today, that’s not possible (my print version won’t arrive for a few more days).

I can see all the cartoons on the newyorker.com slideshow, but for me, that’s less appealing than seeing how they reside on the magazine’s pages. I also love seeing what else is going on in the issue, graphically (such as: has Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead returned yet…you know, things like that).

— So long then, until I have access to the magazine, in one version or another. 

…the latest issue appeared online late Monday afternoon. 

Twelve cartoons in the issue.  Here’re the cartoonists:

Bruce Kaplan’s caption caught my eye this week, as well as his somewhat complex drawing.  Also catching my eye: the number of illustrations (drawings and photographs). There are eighteen with four of them full page (and one of those actually a page-and-a-half).

Usually I don’t mention the cartoon caption page, but I do like Joe Dator’s kites offered up this week. It has a Jack Ziegler feel to it. Perhaps Mr. Dator will reveal his caption (if there was one) once the contest is settled.

Of special note: a nice Charles Addams piece by the cartoonist, Paul Karasik (it appears under the “Sketchbook” heading).

For more on the issue’s cartoons check out the Cartoon Companion at week’s end.

Extra special note: Rea Irvin’s classic masthead is still missing. Here’s what it looks like:

— See you when the next new issue is out, July 16th…seems like a long way off!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Museum of Comic & Cartoon Art Fest 2018: Liniers! Chast! Karasik! & More!; New York Times Robert Grossman Obit; Tilley Trivia

If it’s Spring, it’s time for the Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art’s annual fest, otherwise known as MoCCa Fest (it’s produced by The Society of Illustrators).

The two day event begins April 6th. Scheduled events include Roz Chast being interviewed by the Virtual Memories host, Gil Roth, a conversation with Liniers (and an exhibition of his work), and a Nancy panel discussion with Paul Karasik and friends.  Link here to all the info

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New York Times Robert Grossman Obit

Here’s the Times obit of Mr. Grossman written by Neil Genzlinger — it’s in today’s paper.  Glad to see Mr. Genzlinger mentioned Mr. Grossman’s stint at the New Yorker as well as including The Yew Norker.

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Back in 2013 the Spill posted a map of Manhattan (“The New Yorker’s New York”) showing where various New Yorker  folk once lived. Here’s another address I’ll eventually add to the map:  75 1/2 Bedford Street, otherwise known as  the narrowest house in New York City. It was once the home of William Steig. 

— My thanks to Gretchen Maslin for the info. 

 

Podcast of Interest: How To Read Nancy’s Karasik & Newgarden; Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind

How To Read Nancy authors, Karasik & Newgarden join Gil Roth on his Virtual Memories ShowListen here.

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Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker Magazine

A look at the issue of December 8, 1928 —  wherein appears one of the most famous of all New Yorker cartoons:

  Read it here

*Here’s a revamped Spill post from Dec. 21, 2013 on the evolution of the caption for the drawing:

E.B. White is remembered as author of one of the most popular cartoon captions of the magazine’s earlier days, but perhaps it might be more accurate to say he was co-author, having adapted the caption from the artist’s original submission. The published caption, as it appeared beneath Carl Rose’s drawing in the December 8, 1928 New Yorker:spinach

“It’s broccoli, dear.”

“I say it’s spinach, and I say the hell with it.”

 

The original caption, below, as submitted by Rose himself provided the framework for White’s sterling re-working. Rose’s original caption:

“Mother, if I eat my spinach, may I have some chocolate pudding?”

“No, dear, there isn’t any chocolate pudding today.”

“Well, the, the hell with the spinach.”