The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 20, 2020

A Note To Readers: Due to the times we’re in the digital edition of the magazine appears later in the day than usual. Thus, instead of the usual look through the magazine, I’m working off of the slide show of cartoons on newyorker.com, as well as the cover Q&A found there. If any mistakes are made on my part I’ll correct them once the digital issue is posted.

Update: 1:00pm.  Digital issue posted about an hour ago.

The Cover: Owen Smith gives us a tired worker (the piece is titled — and again, why do we need cover titles? —  “After The Shift”)…four out of the last five covers have been corona virus themed. Read about the cover here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

I don’t know how others respond to an issue’s cartoons. For me, it’s always at least a two-level response:

1. How each drawing hits me — did a drawing stand out (for better or worse).

2. The feeling from all the drawings combined: was it a strong issue of work, or not.

This new issue feels strong, covering a wide range of territory in cartoonland, from aliens (courtesy of Charlie Hankin) to a PC Satyr (from Edward Koren), from dolphins in a swimming pool (McPhail), to what might be found on the other side of the mountaintop (Colin Tom)… and so much more.

 

The Rea Irvin Masthead Watch:

Rea Irvin, the fellow shown here, did so much to shape the look of The New Yorker (okay, I’ll say it — he was instrumental). One of his greatest lasting contributions was adapting Allen Lewis’s typeface; it eventually became known as the Irvin typeface, although these days I hear it   referred to as the New Yorker typeface.  Among Irvin’s many contributions other than art supervisor to Harold Ross (in itself a huge contribution!) was contributing covers, including, of course, the very first one, featuring Eustace Tilley. He also contributed cartoons, and headings for various departments. His design for Talk Of The Town stood in place (with a few adjustments in the magazine’s earliest days) for 92 years, until May of 2017 when his iconic design was mothballed and replaced by a redraw.

Am I wrong to think of Irvin’s typeface, his Tilley, his Talk masthead, and his “catholic” taste in cartoon selection as representing the graphic soul of the magazine?  So many modern changes (or “tweaks” as they were referred to) were test ballooned in recent years and then withdrawn (layout, typography, headings, etc., etc.) —  why not bring back this not insignificant bit of soul.

 

The New Yorker Date & Price Switcheroo; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s); Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Blitt’s Kvetchbook; New Yorker Cartoonist Newbies 2019

New Yorker Date & Price Switcheroo.

It’s only taken me twenty-two years to notice that the New Yorker switched its cover placement of the issue date and issue price.

Since the very first issue, published February 21, 1925, the issue date appeared top left, and the price upper right. Seventy-three years after that first issue, in the summer of 1998, while Tina Brown was exiting her editorship of the magazine (she announced her departure on July 8th) and the double issue of June 22 & 29th gave way to the next issue, dated July 6, 1998, the date and price placements were switched.  I know, I know: small potatoes compared to the more dramatic changes Ms. Brown instituted.

Below, left: The issue of June 22 & 29, 1998. Owen Smith‘s the cover artist.  On the right, the issue of July 6, 1998. Edward Sorel, cover artist.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s)

Ellie Black on future folks.  Ms. Black has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2019.

Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Escaping the cold by Caitlin Cass, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.

Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

“The Times Square New Year’s Ball Tells All”

by Ellis Rosen and The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes.

 

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 Blitt’s Kvetchbook

“Out With The Auld” — from Mr. Blitt, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1992.

Visit his website here.

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Twenty-six cartoonists joined The New Yorker stable of cartoonists this year — a record-breaking number. The issue debut date appears next to each name. 

 

 

Hartley Lin (1.21.19)

Karl Stevens (1.21.19)

Ellie Black (2.11.19)

Liz Montague (3.11.19)

Suerynn Lee ((3.25.19)

Adam Douglas Thompson (4.8.19)

Brooke Bourgeois (4.15.19)

Becky Barnicoat (4.22.19)

Miriam Katin (4.29.19)

Evan Lian (5.6.19)

Kasia Babis (5.20.19)

John Cuneo (5.27.19)…Mr. Cuneo, a New Yorker cover artist, crossed-over to the Cartoon Dept.

Johnny DiNapoli (6.3.19)

Eugenia Viti (6.10 & 17.19)

Lydia Conklin (6.10 & 17.19)

Emily Bernstein (7.1.19)

Seth Roberts & Brian Hawes (7.1.19)…a duo.

Victor Varnado (7.8.19)

Akeem Roberts (7.8.19)

Madeleine Horwath (7.15.19)

Lisa Rothstein (8. 5 & 12. 19)

Yael Green (10.14.19)

Luke Kruger-Howard (11.4.19)

Jared Nangle (12.9.19)

Mo Welch (12.9.19)

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Yorker Artists Converse in San Fran; Partying with Mick Stevens

LitQuake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From LitQuake, notice of an event in San Francisco, October 15th: “Every Picture Tells A Story: New Yorker Artists in Conversation” — the artists are Tom Toro, Mark Ulriksen, Eric Drooker, and Owen Smith

 

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Mick

 

And the guest blogs continue over at newyorker.com. This week it’s Party Time With Mick Stevens”

Link here to Mick Stevens’ website

Link to Mick’s work on The New Yorker’s Cartoon Bank  site.