Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Nurit Karlin Archive To Columbia University; Meet The Artist (1943): Otto Soglow

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Compared to Baby Yoda, by Lila Ash. Ms. Ash has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2018. Visit her website here.

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Nurit Karlin’s Archive To Columbia University

A Facebook announcement from Columbia University’s Karen Green:

Here’s Nurit Karlin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Nurit Karlin (above. Photo taken at a Playboy holiday party, NYC, early 1990s). Born in Jerusalem, 1940.  Died, Tel Aviv, April, 2019.  New Yorker work: 1974 – 1988. Collection: No Comment (Scribner, 1978). For more on Karlin see pp 124 -130 of Liza Donnelly’s Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus Books, 2005).

 

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Meet The Artist (1943): Otto Soglow

Another in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943.

Mr. Soglow’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Otto Soglow Born, Yorkville, NY, December 23, 1900. Died in NYC, April 1975. New Yorker work: 1925 -1974. Key collections: Pretty Pictures (Farrar & Rinehart, 1931) and for fans of Soglow’s Little King: The Little King (Farrar & Rinehart, 1933) and The Little King ( John Martin’s House, Inc., 1945). The latter Little King is an illustrated storybook. Cartoon Monarch / Otto Soglow & The Little King (IDW, 2012) is an excellent compendium.

 

 

 

 

The New York Times Nurit Karlin Obit; Cover Revealed For Liana Finck’s “Excuse Me”; Article Of Interest: Rowland B. Wilson; A Sempe Illustrated Story To Be Animated; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Avi Steinberg

The New York Times Nurit Karlin Obit

From The New York Times, May 7, 2019, “Nurit Karlin, Who Found Her Voice In Wordless Cartoons, Dies At 80”

Above: Liza Donnelly, on the left, with Ms. Karlin in Tel Aviv in 2017.  Far right: A Nurit Karlin self-portrait

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Cover Revealed For Liana Finck’s “Excuse Me”

Due September 24th from Random House Trade Paperbacks, Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, and Notes to Self promises to be a fun 416 page collection by Ms. Finck, who began contributing cartoons to The New Yorker in 2013. 

 

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Article of Interest: Rowland B. Wilson

From the Art Contrarian, May 6, 2019, “The Carefully Observant Rowland B. Wilson” — this piece on Mr. Wilson who contributed 47 cartoons to The New Yorker from 1961 – 1981.

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Sempe Illustrated Story To Be Animated

From Cartoon Brew, May 6, 2019, “Goscinny and Sempe’s ‘Le Petit Nicholas’ to be Adapted as 2D Animated Film by On Entertainment” 

Mr. Sempe began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978. 

(a tip of the hat to Mike Lynch, whose social media post brought this piece to my attention).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

A Game Of Thrones coffee cup inspires today’s Daily cartoon (…by Avi Steinberg, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012. 

 

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Exhibit Of Interest: Peter Steiner’s Recent Paintings; The Tilley Watch Online, April 29 – May 4, 2019; Seth Fleishman’s Tribute To Nurit Karlin

Exhibit Of Interest: Peter Steiner’s Recent Paintings

Peter Steiner, a person who wears many hats (cartoonist, novelist, teacher, painter) will show recent paintings at the Hotchkiss Library of Sharon in June.  All the info here (including an expanded bio). 

Mr. Steiner began contributing his cartoons to The New Yorker in 1979. His 1993 drawing“On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog” is one of the magazine’s most reprinted cartoons in its history. 

Mr. Steiner’s next book, The Good Cop, will be out this November.

Visit his website here.

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The Tilley Watch Online, April 29 – May 4, 2019

A weekly round-up of work by New Yorker cartoonists appearing on newyorker.com’s Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Avi Steinberg, John Cuneo, Lila Ash, David Sipress, and Adam Douglas Thompson.

Daily Shouts: Ellie Black, Jeremy Nguyen (with Irving Ruan), Caitlin Cass, Ali Fitzgerald, and Roz Chast.

To see all the above, and more, link here.

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Seth Fleishman’s Tribute To Nurit Karlin

The cartoonist Seth Fleishman, is, along with John O’Brien, one of The New Yorker‘s few steady practitioners of the captionless cartoon (a far more difficult form, I’ve always believed, than the captioned cartoon).  Mr. Fleishman and Mr. O’Brien have done wonders with captionless cartoons in recent times.  

When Mr. Fleishman learned of the passing of Nurit Karlin, an earlier master whose entire New Yorker run of cartoons was, by far, captionless, he sent along this photo of himself,  sans text.

 

 

Nurit Karlin 1938-2019: “I Used To Doodle, Then Something Would Be There.”

Word has reached us that the New Yorker cartoonist Nurit Karlin has passed away in Israel. Ms. Karlin’s first New Yorker cartoon ran in the issue of March 18, 1974.  At the time she was the only female cartoonist whose work was appearing in the magazine (the last before her was Mary Petty, who passed away in 1976, but whose final contribution to the magazine was in the issue of March 19, 1966). Ms. Karlin was the only female cartoonist in the pages of The New Yorker from April of 1966 through July of 1978 when Roz Chast’s first cartoon was published. Ms. Karlin went on to draw 77 cartoons for the magazine.  Her last was published October 24, 1988.

Above: Nurit Karlin’s first New Yorker drawing.

According to Liza Donnellys Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons, Ms. Karlin, born in Jerusalem…always drew as a child…after a few years of art school (The Bezalel School of Art) she came to the United States in 1964 to study animation [at The School of Visual Arts]tg. She began working for The New York Times in the Book Review and Op-ed sections.

In 2005 she told Ms. Donnelly: “I don’t think I thought of being a cartoonist. I did these things, and The New Yorker never crossed my mind.” She called the magazine, expecting to get an appointment with [Lee] Lorenz [The New Yorker‘s art editor], but was told to drop off her work. “With me, you know, if they hadn’t taken one from the first batch, I wouldn’t have gone back.”  With that first submission, Lorenz asked to see her.  Donnelly asked Karlin how she got her ideas: “If I knew where they came from, I would be the first in line! I used to doodle, then something would be there.”

 Nurit Karlin (on the right) in Tel Aviv, June, 2017 with Liza Donnelly.  Photo by Daniel Kenet

It is quite understandable, as Ms. Donnelly wrote in Funny Ladies, that Karlin’s work was in the “same realm” as Steinberg’s. Both shared the love of the possibilities of the pen line itself. With Ms. Karlin the results were often more resolved with the one-two punch delivery of the single panel cartoon. Showing her roots in animation, she sometimes used a series of drawings to deliver the punch (I’ve always thought of Ms. Karlin on the outskirts of the school of Thurber although I have no idea if she saw her work that way. The one occasion I had to speak with her, many years ago at a Playboy cartoonist function, the subject didn’t come up).

What is certain about her work is that it was firmly in the school of visual art. If you look through her 1978 collection, No Comment, you’ll be hard pressed to find a captioned drawing  — there isn’t one.  She used words in her cartoons, but sparingly, as in the drawing below from the issue of September 4, 1978.