The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 6, 2020; A Spill Cartoonist List: Fun At First Sight

The Cover Artist: Kadir Nelson returns just two weeks after his stunning cover of June 22nd.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A double issue with eighteen cartoons by eighteen cartoonists (with two duo efforts: Bliss & Martin, Guerra & Boothby). There’s also a Sketchpad drawing from J.A.K., and a newbie in the midst: Patrick McKelvie. Mr. McKelvie is the tenth new cartoonist to join The New Yorker’s stable this year and the sixty-third brought in by cartoon editor Emma Allen since she was appointed in the Spring of 2017.

Here are some of the cartoons in this week’s issue that caught my eye: a classic  lighthouse light bulb drawing by great Sam Gross, and then perhaps my favorite Ellis Rosen drawing ever (so far!) — his cave people drawing (much like Mr. Gross’s lighthouse drawing) proves that there is plenty of humor to unearth in these favorite cartoon scenarios. Liana Finck’s tent basement is terrif, as is Amy Hwang’s great ice cream on the beach scene. Enjoyed Roz Chast’s six-squares (the way she uses language here reminds me of Bizarro Superman).  Lars Kenseth’s superhero is so much fun. Repeating myself here, but Mr. Kenseth’s drawings never fail to amuse me upon first sighting — I’m sold before I get to the caption.

Fun At First Sight:

Thinking of that kind of reaction has caused me to think about (and mention) some other New Yorker cartoonists whose styles alone have won me over at first glance. I’m going to list only those who’ve passed into the great beyond so as not to offend anyone still around who I might inadvertently forget to mention.

Each of the following had a “theirs alone” style unlike any other being published in the magazine. That’s a wonderful thing, and difficult to do in a crowded cartoonist universe; each brought something else to the drawing paper as well — sometimes easily defined (see Dean Vietor’s work, for example: I’ve mentioned his thrilling wild energetic drawings before on the Spill), and sometimes not.

So here, in alphabetical order are some (not all!) of those fun at first sight New Yorker artists …Addams, Arno (Peter & Ed), Charles Barsotti, Whitney Darrow, Chon Day, Alan Dunn, Dana Fradon, Helen Hokinson, Nurit Karlin, Anatol Kovarsky, Robert Kraus, Frank Modell, Mary Petty, Price (George & Garrett), Gardner Rea, Donald Reilly, Carl Rose, Al Ross, Charles Saxon, Bernie Schoenbaum, Barbara Shermund, Otto Soglow, Steig, Steinberg, James Stevenson, Richard Taylor, Thurber, Dean Vietor, Robert Weber, Gluyas Williams, Gahan Wilson, and Jack Ziegler.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Would love to report that Rea Irvin’s iconic design had returned (it’s been collecting dust since it was replaced by a redraw(!) in the Spring of 2017). But such is not the case. Bah, humbug.

Read about it here.

Here’s what we’re missing:

 

 

 

Thurber Thursday: A Thurber Dog Cap; Sutton’s Daily; Chast In Florida; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

There aren’t a lot of wearables in the Spill’s archives — a Sam Cobean scarf, and just a few hats: one worn by Mischa Richter for the Arnold Newman New Yorker cartoonists group photo shoot in 1997, and this Thurber cap, bought ages ago in Columbus, Ohio at The Thurber House. I’ve always loved the simplicity of it — no need to fill the hat with running dogs. As befits Thurber’s art, less is so much more.

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Yesterday’s Daily Shouts, courtesy of the fab Ward Sutton: “Where All That Bloomberg Campaign Money Went”

Mr. Sutton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. Visit his website here.

 

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Chast In Florida

From Boca, March 4, 2020, “Roz Chast Delights, Moves Audience at Festival of the Arts”***

***A correction regarding this passage in the above piece:

She [Roz Chast] explored a bit of her glass-ceiling backstory as the only female cartoonist at the New Yorker circa 1978, when, at 23, she made a sale from her very first batch of submissions.

Nurit Karlin’s cartoons were being published at the time Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker. Ms. Karlin’s cartoons appeared in The New Yorker from 1974 through 1988.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Being right all the time, courtesy of David Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998. See more of his work here.

The Forever Fun Work By Nurit Karlin, Dana Fradon, and Gahan Wilson

2019 was an unusually rough year in the loss column for New Yorker cartoonists. We lost Nurit Karlin in April, Dana Fradon in October, and then Gahan Wilson in November.  Although we miss them, and mourn them, we have thousands of their cartoons at hand in anthologies, collections, and online.  A wonderful thing happened this morning when I began looking once again at Nurit’s, Dana’s and Gahan’s drawings in New Yorker anthologies: their work gave me a cartoonist jump-start into the new year — a fun boost as 2020 begins.

Ms. Karlin, the lone female cartoonist at the magazine during her first four years at the magazine, reinvigorated the school of Thurber:  simple clean lines delighting as much as a Reginald Marsh double-page extravaganza. Ms. Karlin found humor without captions — in my book a most difficult way to define one’s cartoon world.  She moved the captionless tradition into modern times; a  corner of the cartoonist’s universe notably practiced  by Sam Cobean and Otto Soglow in the magazine’s earlier years.

Dana Fradon, 97 at the time of his passing, was our last cartoonist link to the Harold Ross era. Mr. Fradon had excellent recall of the generations of New Yorker contributors he encountered during his more than half a century contributing his organically funny drawings. Good humor and high-bar artistry stayed with him throughout. Mr. Fradon, along with a number of his contemporaries, excelled at inverted tip-of-the-iceberg drawings: the point he wanted to make was just below the surface.

Gahan Wilson, affectionately and accurately dubbed the Wizard Of Weird, was the child who loved to draw monsters who grew up to be the adult who drew monsters. It was Mr. Wilson’s genuine love of that frightening world, and his gifted exploration of it throughout his life that caused us to cherish him and his work.

 

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Nurit Karlin Archive To Columbia University; Meet The Artist (1943): Otto Soglow

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Compared to Baby Yoda, by Lila Ash. Ms. Ash has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2018. Visit her website here.

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Nurit Karlin’s Archive To Columbia University

A Facebook announcement from Columbia University’s Karen Green:

Here’s Nurit Karlin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Nurit Karlin (above. Photo taken at a Playboy holiday party, NYC, early 1990s). Born in Jerusalem, 1940.  Died, Tel Aviv, April, 2019.  New Yorker work: 1974 – 1988. Collection: No Comment (Scribner, 1978). For more on Karlin see pp 124 -130 of Liza Donnelly’s Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus Books, 2005).

 

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Meet The Artist (1943): Otto Soglow

Another in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943.

Mr. Soglow’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Otto Soglow Born, Yorkville, NY, December 23, 1900. Died in NYC, April 1975. New Yorker work: 1925 -1974. Key collections: Pretty Pictures (Farrar & Rinehart, 1931) and for fans of Soglow’s Little King: The Little King (Farrar & Rinehart, 1933) and The Little King ( John Martin’s House, Inc., 1945). The latter Little King is an illustrated storybook. Cartoon Monarch / Otto Soglow & The Little King (IDW, 2012) is an excellent compendium.

 

 

 

 

The New York Times Nurit Karlin Obit; Cover Revealed For Liana Finck’s “Excuse Me”; Article Of Interest: Rowland B. Wilson; A Sempe Illustrated Story To Be Animated; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Avi Steinberg

The New York Times Nurit Karlin Obit

From The New York Times, May 7, 2019, “Nurit Karlin, Who Found Her Voice In Wordless Cartoons, Dies At 80”

Above: Liza Donnelly, on the left, with Ms. Karlin in Tel Aviv in 2017.  Far right: A Nurit Karlin self-portrait

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Cover Revealed For Liana Finck’s “Excuse Me”

Due September 24th from Random House Trade Paperbacks, Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, and Notes to Self promises to be a fun 416 page collection by Ms. Finck, who began contributing cartoons to The New Yorker in 2013. 

 

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Article of Interest: Rowland B. Wilson

From the Art Contrarian, May 6, 2019, “The Carefully Observant Rowland B. Wilson” — this piece on Mr. Wilson who contributed 47 cartoons to The New Yorker from 1961 – 1981.

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Sempe Illustrated Story To Be Animated

From Cartoon Brew, May 6, 2019, “Goscinny and Sempe’s ‘Le Petit Nicholas’ to be Adapted as 2D Animated Film by On Entertainment” 

Mr. Sempe began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978. 

(a tip of the hat to Mike Lynch, whose social media post brought this piece to my attention).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

A Game Of Thrones coffee cup inspires today’s Daily cartoon (…by Avi Steinberg, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012. 

 

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