A Valentine’s Day Cartoon; A Case For Pencils Spotlights Nick Downes; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

 

 

— from The New Yorker,  Feb. 22, 2016

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A Case For Pencils Spotlights Nick Downes

Jane Mattimoe’s terrif blog, A Case For Pencils features Nick Downes this week. Take a look.

Mr. Downes, shown here in a sort of Eustace Tilley-ish pose, began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

Visit Mr. Downes’s website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Amy Hwang on love of chocolate. Ms. Hwang began contributing to The New Yorker in 2010.

Visit her website here.

Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From cartoonist, Olivia de Recat, & writer, Julia Edelman: “Dating Material: A Pop Quiz To Determine If You’re In A Relationship”

Olivia de Recat has been contributing her cartoons to The New Yorker since 2013. Visit her website here.

Fave Photo Of The Day: A Dozen New Yorker Cartoonists At Lunch; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s); Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Roz Chast & Patricia Marx’s 2020 Book Tour Schedule

Fave Photo Of The Day: New Yorker Cartoonists At Lunch

New Yorker cartoonists get together all the time, usually in groups of two or three. Every so often there’s a larger crowd, like today’s gathering of a dozen on Manhattan’s upper east side. They’re pictured above (the year each cartoonist began contributing to the magazine appears beside their name).

Seated, left to right: Warren Miller (1961), Nick Downes (1998), and Bob Eckstein (2007). Standing, left to right: John O’Brien (1987), Mort Gerberg (1965), Sam Gross (1969), Robert Leighton (2002), David Borchart (2007), Danny Shanahan (1988), Roz Chast (1978), Liza Donnelly (1982), and yours truly (1977).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

David Sipress on tonight’s Democratic Presidential debate. Mr. Sipress has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998. __________________________________

Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

J.A.K. on Best Picture nominees. Mr. K. has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2014. His latest book is Everything Is An Emergency: An OCD Story in Words & Pictures (HarperCollins).

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Today’s Daily Shouts:

“Introducing Meghan And Harry’s Etsy Shop” by Emily Flake, who began contributing her cartoons to The New Yorker in 2008.

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Roz Chast & Patricia Marx’s 2020 Book Tour Schedule

Roz Chast’s Book Tour Began yesterday. Tonight she’s at The Strand. Her latest book is You Can Only Yell At Me For One Thing At A Time: Rules For Couples, co-authored with Patricia Marx.

(This image found on Stephen Nadler’s Facebook page (he of Attempted Bloggery). Thanks, Mr. N.)

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of December 23, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Emma Allen’s Year In Review Not-To-Be-Missed Daily Shouts; Blitt’s Mao & Nixon

The Cover:  Ed Steed’s third New Yorker cover in five months. This makes my day: it’s always great to see a New Yorker cartoonist cross-over from the cartoon department to the art department (shades of the pre-Tina Brown days when the cartoonists provided the majority of covers). Here’s a Q&A with Mr. Steed about his latest cover.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Zipping through this new issue I see it’s loaded with cartoons (yay!).  I also see that the freshman class of the 1970s is well represented: Roz Chast, Mick Stevens, the late Jack Ziegler, and myself; there are also four freshman from the class of the 1990s: P.C. Vey, Nick Downes, Kim Warp, and Barbara Smaller. And at opposite ends of the time line are George Booth, a freshman in the class of the 1960s (1969 to be a little more precise), and Keith Knight, who makes his New Yorker debut in this issue (so a freshman in the class of the 2010s). Mr. Knight is the 27th newbie of the year, and the 53rd to join The New Yorker‘s stable since Emma Allen took the cartoon department reins in the Spring of 2017.

Seeing the Booth cartoon (it’s on p.32) takes me right back to my fledgling days at The New Yorker and my belief that Mr. Booth’s work is what the magazine’s cartoons are all about: superb drawing, and a precisely defined world of personalized humor. Some forty plus years after I discovered Mr. Booth’s world I still get revved up and inspired from seeing one of his drawings.

A couple of thoughts on a couple of drawings: both Sofia Warren’s fine drawing (p.51) and Nick Downes’ wonderful Rockefeller Center skating rink drawing would’ve benefited us (the readers) had they been allowed more space. These are drawings full of great detail.

On the other hand, Roz Chast’s funny Abominable Snow-Woman (p.73) seems just the right size. Such a good drawing. It would be great if she marketed her snow-woman as a stuffed toy (I’d want one).

Really enjoyed Paul Noth’s Bat-signal/Robin-signal drawing (p.42).  I especially like the work he put into Batman and Robin’s outfits.

Speaking of cartoon worlds, as I was earlier in regards to Mr. Booth’s work, I cannot leave this ramble on the cartoons without mentioning how missed Jack Ziegler’s cartoon world is. Seeing his drawing in this issue is a tip of the iceberg reminder of what a spectacularly funny cartoonist he was. If you don’t already have his masterpiece collection, Hamburger Madness, get it.

 

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Bah, humbug…nothing has changed.  The redrawn masthead, installed in the Spring of 2017 still sits where Mr. Irvin’s beauty once sat. Below is Mr. Irvin’s classic design; here’s where you can read more about it.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Ellie Black on a critic’s crisis.

Ms. Black has been contributing to The New Yorker since February of this year.

 

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Shouts In Review

Emma Allen, The New Yorker’s cartoon editor, and editor of  Daily Shouts, lists Shouts highlights.

A whole bunch of New Yorker cartoonists are therein.

 

 

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Blitt’s Mao & Nixon

From “Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook,” a flashback to February of 1972, when Nixon met Mao. Above: the real deal.

 

 

 

New Yorker Cartoonists (And Cakes) At The Magazine’s Holiday Party

Here are a few scenes from last night’s merry New Yorker Holiday Party. A happy throng filled a giant room on the 33rd floor of 1 World Trade Center.

All photos courtesy of Liza Donnelly, unless otherwise attributed. My thanks to cartoonists Liza  Donnelly, Joe Dator, Felipe Galindo, and Jason Chatfield for their photos.

Left: New Yorker editor, David Remnick (holding microphone) addresses the crowd. Singers in Santa hats are just behind him.

Party-goers brought food and drink (it was pot-luck), a nice throw-back to what I recall of department holiday parties many decades ago at the magazine’s 2nd address, 25 West 43rd Street.

 

Of the many cakes and cookies present (and presented), here’s one that sported a familiar face ( photo courtesy Joe Dator).

Below: The New Yorker carolers (photo courtesy Jason Chatfield).

Below: l-r, cartoonist Maggie Larson and cover artist, Jenny Kroik.

Below: cartoonist & caroler, Mort Gerberg  (photo courtesy Jason Chatfield).

Below: l-r, cartoonists Joe Dator, Ali Solomon, and Johnny DiNapoli (photo courtesy Joe Dator).

Below: l-r, cartoonists Drew Dernavich, Ellis Rosen, and by the window, Kendra Allenby.

Below: l-r, the aforementioned Ms. Allenby, Jeremy Nguyen, and The New Yorker‘s fabled Stanley Ledbetter.

Below: l-r,  New Yorker editor, David Remnick, and Pam McCarthy, the magazine’s deputy editor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: l-r, cartoonists Felipe Galindo, and Tim Hamilton.

Below: l-r, Joe Dator, Kendra Allenby, and Ben Schwartz (photo courtesy Joe Dator).

Below: cartoonists Marisa Acocella, and Bob Eckstein.

Below: The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen.

Below: cartoonist Pat Byrnes (holding red cup) surveys the food.

Below: cartoonists Robert Sikoryak, and Gabrielle Bell. (photo courtesy Felipe Galindo).

Below: l-r, cartoonist Nick Downes, and the aforementioned Mr. Ledbetter.

Below: l-r, cartoonists Jason Adam Katzenstein, Karen Sneider, Emily Flake, and The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes. (photo courtesy Felipe Galindo).

Below: cartoonists Christopher Weyant, Ms. Acocella, and coming up behind Ms. Acocella, Sam Gross.

Below: cartoonists Ellie Black, and Maggie Larson.

Below: cartoonists Joe Dator and Emily Flake,  Jason Adam Katzenstein in profile behind Ms. Flake, and Drew Dernavich, far right. .

Below: l-r, cover artist & cartoonist, John Cuneo, The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, and cover artist, Peter de Seve (this photo taken in Ms. Mouly’s “planning room” in the art department)

Below: l-r, cartoonists Jeremy Nguyen, Jason Chatfield, and Liza Donnelly

Below: cartoonists David Borchart and Felipe Galindo.

Below: cartoonists Peter Kuper and P.C. Vey

A cake with a message (photo courtesy of Joe Dator).

 

James Stevenson Documentary Film “Lost And Found” Draws New Yorker Cartoonists; The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (Yesterday’s &Today’s); Meet The Artist (1943): James Thurber; New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality

James Stevenson Documentary Film,”Lost And Found” Draws New Yorker Cartoonists

A special screening of “Stevenson Lost And Found,” a wonderful documentary film about the late great New Yorker artist and writer, attracted  a number of cartoonists last week to the Made In New York Media Center.

Here’s the crowd, post-screening, along with the late Mr. Stevenson’s wife, Josie Merck, (who is also one of the film’s executive producers), along with the film’s director and producer, Sally Williams.

Front row, left to right: Mort Gerberg, Sofia Warren, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Jeremy Nguyen, Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Sam Gross, Cerise Zelenetz, Eugenia Viti, Josie Merck, Sally Williams, Liza Donnelly.

Back row, left to right:  Jason Chatfield, Heather Loase, Ellis Rosen, Johnny DiNapoli, Kendra Allenby, Bishakh Som, Tim Hamilton, Nick Downes, Andy Dubbin, Robert Leighton, Michael Maslin

And here’s James Stevenson’e entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time idea man, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson has long been a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He is a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s recent book, published in 2013, The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, is essential.

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The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (Yesterday’s & Today’s)

To bag or not to bag, by Lila Ash. Ms. Ash began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.

Teresa Burns Parkhurst on the work days before Thanksgiving. Ms. Parkhurst began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

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Meet The Cartoonist (1943): James Thurber

Another in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943

Thurber’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Thurber  Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

And for a lot more Thurber, go here.

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New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality

Read all about it here, and see the video! (that’s The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes — who wrote the script for the video — being Heimliched in the background by actress, Madeline Wise.