New York Times Dana Fradon Obit; New Books!; New Yorker Cover Artist Roxie Munro Remembers Dana Fradon; Edward Koren On Dana Fradon; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts…By Jenny Kroik

The New York Times Dana Fradon Obit

Here’s Richard Sandomir’s New York Times obit for Dana Fradon, who passed away last week at the age of 97.

Shown above, left to right: New Yorker artist Charles Saxon, New Yorker art editor (from 1939 – 1973) James Geraghty, New Yorker artist Dana Fradon, and New Yorker artist,Whitney Darrow, Jr.

–photo: Sarah Geraghty Herndon

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Here are three books of note out soon (one’s out today).

 

 

Emily Flake’s That Was Awkward: The Art and Etiquette of the Awkward Hug (Viking) is out this very day. Ms. Flake has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2008.  Link here to her website.

 

 

Next week (Tuesday, October 25th)  Everyone’s A Critic  (Princeton Architectural Press) a cartoon anthology that includes contributions by 35 New Yorker cartoonists.  The book is the second in a series edited by Bob Eckstein who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007.

 

 

On November 5th , Peter Kuper’s Heart Of Darkness is out from W.W. Norton & Co.. Link here to Mr. Kuper’s website. He has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2011.

 

 

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New Yorker Cover Artist Roxie Munro Remembers Dana Fradon

Roxie Munro, who began contributing covers to The New Yorker with the issue of November 9, 1981  has posted the following piece on Facebook about her late colleague and friend, The New Yorker artist Dana Fradon.

My comments on dear friend Dana Fradon’s passing:

Very very sad about Dana. He was a great friend. A wonderfully talented artist and cartoonist. Satirical, ironic, and very quick – at Tuesday lunches after New Yorker submissions, anything in the service of a witty line, even if it meant sharp jabs at friends. All of which were forgiven in awe of the smart retort. Probably the first very very politically liberal person I met. Super original cartoons on many subjects, including political Washington. We shared house rentals a couple times w/fellow New Yorker artists on Cape Cod; spent weeks traveling in the UK, Paris, and the Dordogne (with some great adventures); hung out on weekends in his classic farmhouse in Newtown, CT (he made a great stew with all sorts of meats, and a really good scallop fettuccine); and part of a summer in Lake Como, Italy, at an artist’s workshop. He did two VERY cool children’s books on medieval knights with my publisher. Dana was an original. He was from a rough and tumble area of Chicago, and served in WW II. His like will not be seen again.

Lots of the guys had quirky “issues” with each other. But they all were brothers, in the difficult business of selling cartoons. And, interestingly, they were NOT male chauvinist pigs, at least not to me. They were respectful of women artists, and supportive, and treated us as equals, though we weren’t; that generation of cartoonists were unique artists and very well-read, smart (mostly) men – Ed Fisher, Donald Reilly, Lee Lorenz, Booth, Addams, Hamilton, Chuck Saxon, Modell, Weber, Richter, Meyer, Ross, Tobey, Henry Martin, Dedini, Drucker, Miller, Farris, Mirachi, Frascino (and later, Levin, Gross, Ziegler, Stevens, Cline, Steiner, Koren, and others). What a group of wonderful talented characters!

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Edward Koren On Dana Fradon

From newyorker.com, The Timeless Cartoons Of Dana Fradon, by long-time contributor, Edward Koren.

 

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Peter Kuper does the honors. (See above for more on Mr. Kuper).

 

Today’s Daily Shouts

“The N.Y.C. Bridal Struggle” but cover artist, Jenny Kroik.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of October 21, 2019; Head-Scratching Quote Of The Year; Addams’s Wednesday

The Cover: a somewhat menacing image by Mark Ulriksen that could’ve easily been used for Halloween (all it needs is a witch riding through the sky on a broom). But its title “Towering Wealth” heavily suggests a tie-in to this special Money Issue. Read a Q&A with Mr. Ulriksen about his cover here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Random thoughts after a few tours through the the issue…

Was much fun immediately running into Robert Leighton’s observatory cartoon (page 25). We don’t see too many observatory cartoons anymore.  One that will forever stick in my mind is John O’Brien’s fabulous Coca-Cola bottle telescope from October 9, 2000.

Any issue of The New Yorker with a George Booth cartoon (p.38) is an issue off to an excellent start. It is simply a delight seeing his work in the magazine.

As enjoyable as seeing a Booth cartoon is seeing a Koren cartoon. He is this issue’s most veteran artist, having begun contributing to The New Yorker in 1962 (Mr. Booth began contributing in 1969).  To my eye, Both Mr. Booth’s drawing and Mr. Koren’s sit perfectly on the page, the better for us to enjoy them.

Bruce Kaplan’s dishtowel drawing (p.55) wins the award for most unexpected cartoon of the issue. There is nothing more fun in The New Yorker cartoon universe than the unexpected; it’s a cartoon moment.

Liana Finck’s drawing (p.46) is another solid cartoon moment.  Drawing + perfect caption = job well done.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Mr. Irvin’s wonderful design (below) was removed in the Spring of 2017 and replaced by a redrawn version. Further reading here. It remains puzzling (to me anyway) how something so perfect can be mothballed.

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Head-Scratching Quote Of The Year

This from Francoise Mouly, The New Yorker’s art editor in an October 11th Washington Post piece on Charles Addams.

“Addams is one of the few New Yorker cartoonists who was consistently laugh-out funny,” says Francoise Mouly, the magazine’s art editor since 1993.”

 

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Addams’s Wednesday

From The New York Times, October 14, 2019, “The Many Shades Of Wednesday Addams”

Miss Addams is shown above sitting on her father’s shoulder. According to Linda Davis’s wonderful biography of Charles Addams, Addams wrote in his production notes for the television series that “he found [Wednesday] ‘secretive and imaginative, and  poetic.'”

 

 

 

 

Video Of Interest: New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor Emma Allen On NYC’s NY1; More Addams Family; A Friday Fave Photo; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor Emma Allen appeared on the New York’s NY1 this morning, along with cartoonist J.A.K.  See it here!

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Addams Family Reviews

The L.A. Times Review

The New York Times Review

For way way more more on Addams and The Addams Family, check out Linda Davis’s 2006 Charles Addams: A Cartoonist’s Life (Random House).

And here’s a link to the official Addams website.

 

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A Friday Fave Photo

New Yorker cartoonists Amy Hwang and Jeremy Nguyen, co-curators of the recently opened Asian Babies exhibit.  The show features work by Ms. Hwang and Mr. Nguyen along with New Yorker cartoonist colleagues Maddie Dai, Alice Cheng, Hartley Lin, Colin Tom, Christine Mi, Suerynn Lee, Evan Lian, and Monroe Leung.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The terrif artist Peter Kuper on Trump, impeachment and the Nobel Peace Prize

Article Of Interest: Liza Donnelly’s “How I Became A New Yorker Cartoonist”

From newyorker.com‘s Culture Desk, October 10, 2019, “How I Became A New Yorker Cartoonist” — Liza Donnelly talks about the path that led to her forty years (and counting) at The New Yorker.

Here’s Ms. Donnelly’s entry on The Spill‘s A-Z:

Liza Donnelly  Born, Washington, D.C. New Yorker work: June 21, 1982 –. Key book: Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Edited:  Sex & Sensibility: Ten Women Examine the Lunacy of Modern Love…in 200 Cartoons ( Twelve, 2008). Co-authored with Michael Maslin: Husbands & Wives ( Ballantine 1995), Call Me When You Reach Nirvana ( Andrew & McMeel, 1995), Cartoon Marriage ( with Michael Maslin) (Random House, 2009), When Do They Serve the Wine?( Chronicle, 2010). Women On Men (Narrative Library, 2013). Donnelly also wrote and illustrated a popular series of dinosaur books for children ( Dinosaur Day, Dinosaur Beach, Dinosaur Halloween, etc.) all published by Scholastic.  She is the CBS News Resident Cartoonist. Website: http://www.lizadonnelly.com

“Live” New Yorker Cartoons On Late Night With Seth Meyers And David Remnick; A Saxon In Stockbridge; Mon., Tues. Wed.’s Daily Cartoonists & Cartoons

“Live” New Yorker Cartoons On Late Night With Seth Meyers & David Remnick

The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick joins Seth Meyers for the 8th installment of “Live New Yorker Cartoons.” Cartoons by: Ben Schwartz, John McNamee, Maddie Dai, Ed Steed, and Drew Panckeri.  Watch here.

 

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A Saxon In Stockbridge

If you happen into The Red Lion Inn in Stockbridge, Massachusetts as I did this afternoon, you’ll find an original Charles Saxon drawing hanging on a hallway wall just off the Inn’s pub. According to The New Yorker database it doesn’t appear to have been in the magazine. No matter — it’s a lovely drawing (what Saxon drawing isn’t?).  –photo by Bruce Crocker

Mr. Saxon’s entry on The Spill‘s A-Z:

Charles Saxon (self portrait above left from Best Cartoons of the Year 1947) Born in Brooklyn, Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. New Yorker work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

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Catching Up With The Daily Cartoon Cartoonists & Daily Shouts Cartoonists

Today’s Daily is by Teresa Burns Parkhurst, yesterday’s Daily was by David Sipress, and Monday’s was by J.A.K..

Today’s Daily Shouts...“What Your Followers Were Really Saying When They Liked Your Post” by Tom Chitty and Irving Ruan. Monday’s was by Emily Flake.