Chris Weyant Answers Three Questions; Steig’s Divorce Illustrations; Three Cartoonists at Pennsylvania Fest; Cartoon Companion’s Latest Ratings

 Chris Weyant Answers Three Questions

From The Children’s Book Council, September 5, 2018, “Three Questions With Chris Weyant”

Mr. Weyant began contributing his cartoons to The New Yorker in 1998. Link here to his website.

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Steig’s Divorce Illustrations

Thanks to a fave Spill blog, Attempted Bloggery, we’re able to see some great William Steig illustrations that appeared in American Magazine in the early 1940s.

Mr. Steig’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. NYer work: 1930 -2003.

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Three Cartoonists at Pennsylvania Festival

Bob Eckstein, Chris Weyant, and David Borchart (above, left to right) will appear at the Milford (Pa.) Festival on September 30th.  Read all about it here.

Their work appears in the upcoming anthology, “The Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons by the World’s Greatest Cartoonists” a collection edited by Mr. Eckstein. Due out, March, 2019.

Mr. Eckstein’s latest book is The Illustrated History of the Snowman (Globe Pequot Press). Out now!

Also out is Eraser (Two Lions),by Anna Kang, illustrated by Mr. Weyant.

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Cartoon Companion’s Latest Ratings

Everybody’s got an opinion, but only two folks (“Max” & “Simon”) devote blog space on a regular basis to sizing up every cartoon in each issue of The New Yorker. Read here.

A Price Playbill; Ziegler’s Letterman Appearance; A Couple of Hokinson Dachshunds

A Price Playbill

Without generous donors, the Spill‘s archives would be so much poorer.  Here’s the latest addition: a Playbill with cover art by the great George Price. Stalag 17 premiered at the 48th St. Theatre in May of 1951.  Mr. Price’s work, as a spot artist, premiered in The New Yorker in 1929. In his book, The Art of The New Yorker: 1925-1995, Lee Lorenz, the magazine’s former Art/Cartoon editor (who called Price one of the magazine’s great stylists, along with Helen Hokinson, Peter Arno, William Steig, and James Thurber) described Price’s transition from spot artist to cartoonist:

 After purchasing a few spot drawings from Price, Katharine White invited him in for an interview. She encouraged him to try his hand at cartooning. George was reluctant at first.  He was not an idea person. Mrs. White promised to supply him with gag writers, and on this condition George was persuaded  to begin submitting to the magazine.

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Ziegler’s Letterman Appearance

I’ve linked to this video before, but just happened to see it again last night.  Broadcast June 20, 1983, here’s the late very great Jack Ziegler’s Late Night with David Letterman appearance.  See it here.

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A Couple of Hokinson Dachshunds

I didn’t know that dachshunds were at one time called “liberty hounds” — did you?  Read more  here on Attempted Bloggery about a 1947 Helen Hokinson drawing featuring two of them.

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of November 27, 2017

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

I’ve spent a little time this morning looking through New Yorker Thanksgiving covers over the years. My all-time favorite — it’s the only cover I ever detached from the magazine (for shame!) so I could hang it on the wall — was Steinberg’s from 1976 (the same year he produced the now iconic so-called view from New York cover). His Thanksgiving cover, to my way of thinking, was and is the New Yorker cover at its best (not including Rea Irvin’s very first cover) — and I believe it was Steinberg at his best.  Disagree with me if you’d like, but you’ll never change my mind.

There have been many other great New Yorker  Thanksgiving covers, so very many.  I saw some beauties this morning  by George Booth, one by Anatol Kovarsky, Arnie Levin, Peter Arno, Frank Modell(!), James Stevenson, CEM (Charles E. Martin), William Steig…and on and on.  Gems all. Someone should do a book of them.

This Monday Tilley Watch will be a little different than the ones that have come before. For most, this is a busy week, with a lot of rushing around.  I actually saw people rushing around while I was in a grocery store yesterday.  In that spirit (of rushing) I’m going to mention just five drawings in this new issue (there are 19, with a full page “Comic Strip” by Edward Steed making the total 20). For more on the others I suggest visiting the Cartoon Companion at week’s end [to those who have asked if the Spill is affiliated with the Companion, the answer is nay.  We’re in touch, but their numbered opinions are strictly their own]

And now on to the five:  the first is BEK’s (Bruce Eric Kaplan) drawing (it’s on page 39).  Wonderful caption, perfectly capturing the mood (for many) of the times.  Four pages later, on page 42, a terrific commuter drawing by David Sipress.  Mr. Sipress delivers a drawing that lives up to Peter Arno’s high-bar one-two punch test.  On the opposite page another winner by Liana Finck. She has a knack for taking us away in fairy tale situations. Moving on to page 76, a cartoon by the ever-reliable Paul Noth.  I love that Mr. Noth has put so much into his Thanksgiving football drawing.  Opposite the Noth cartoon, a feast for the eyes: an Edward Koren drawing. Mr. Koren is our longest active contributing artist, having first published in the New Yorker in 1962. 

The “mix” of these drawings is what has always been one of my favorite parts of that first look through every issue of the magazine. Great writing, combined with interesting, oft-times exceptional drawing.

Final notes: Regular Monday Tilley Watch readers perhaps have grown weary of my unrelenting campaign to bring back the Rea Irvin Talk of The Town masthead to the magazine.  Sorry to disappoint, but here it is again:

 To me, removing Mr. Irvin’s creation from the magazine is akin to removing the top of the Chrysler building and replacing it with the top of Philadelphia’s One Liberty Place :

Further note:  debut appearances in this week’s issue by Emma Hunsinger and Sofia Warren, bring the number of new cartoonists introduced under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship to seven — an average of one new cartoonist a month (Ms. Allen began editing the cartoons this past May).  

 

Ink Spill’s New Yorker Cartoonists Library

Library:Ink Spill

 

When I began Ink Spill back in 2008 one of the major sections planned for its future was a library of collections by New Yorker cartoonists. I’m more than pleased to announce that work has been underway for the past few months to build the library and it is now stocked with titles.  Not fully stocked, but well on its way.  Certain cartoonists are yet to be represented (no John Held, Jr. or Bruce Eric Kaplan yet) while others who are represented (like Ludwig Bemelmans, for example) need lots of fleshing out. This is an on-going endeavor with scans of book covers and publishing information continually added.

The library is an attempt to build a comprehensive collection of books (titles and covers)  by the magazine’s artists, including some of the books they illustrated.  In the case where a cartoonist did not publish a collection of their work, we’ve included a book or books they illustrated or wrote/edited (Roberta Macdonald is one example, Julia Suits is another) We’ve also added a number of illustrated books by cartoonists who do have collections (Steinberg, for instance), but the library is by no means trying to be inclusive of all illustrated books.

The  Library draws heavily on our personal collection but is not a catalog of the collection.   Chris Wheeler and Warren Bernard  contributed some of the rarer cover scans. Other images were pulled from various online sources.  I am particularly indebted to Gretchen Maslin, who is archiving the materials and has built the library.  She comes to Ink Spill having worked in Special Collections at the Vassar College Library as well as The New Yorker‘s library.

To enter the Library just click on the new icon to the left (“The New Yorker Cartoonists Library”) or click here.