“Live” New Yorker Cartoons On Late Night With Seth Meyers And David Remnick; A Saxon In Stockbridge; Mon., Tues. Wed.’s Daily Cartoonists & Cartoons

“Live” New Yorker Cartoons On Late Night With Seth Meyers & David Remnick

The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick joins Seth Meyers for the 8th installment of “Live New Yorker Cartoons.” Cartoons by: Ben Schwartz, John McNamee, Maddie Dai, Ed Steed, and Drew Panckeri.  Watch here.

 

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A Saxon In Stockbridge

If you happen into The Red Lion Inn in Stockbridge, Massachusetts as I did this afternoon, you’ll find an original Charles Saxon drawing hanging on a hallway wall just off the Inn’s pub. According to The New Yorker database it doesn’t appear to have been in the magazine. No matter — it’s a lovely drawing (what Saxon drawing isn’t?).  –photo by Bruce Crocker

Mr. Saxon’s entry on The Spill‘s A-Z:

Charles Saxon (self portrait above left from Best Cartoons of the Year 1947) Born in Brooklyn, Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. New Yorker work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

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Catching Up With The Daily Cartoon Cartoonists & Daily Shouts Cartoonists

Today’s Daily is by Teresa Burns Parkhurst, yesterday’s Daily was by David Sipress, and Monday’s was by J.A.K..

Today’s Daily Shouts...“What Your Followers Were Really Saying When They Liked Your Post” by Tom Chitty and Irving Ruan. Monday’s was by Emily Flake.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker, October 14, 2019

The Cover: Ed Steed returns with his second New Yorker cover, and like his first (August 26th of this year) it’s a winner.  Read the magazine’s Q&A with Mr. Steed about his cover here.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

A number of drawings of special note in this issue:

A fab mouse drawing (it’s on page 30) by the great Sam Gross.  As noted here recently, Mr. Gross is now in his 50th year of contributing to The New Yorker.

Sara Lautman’s “…accompanied” drawing (p. 43) is a fine fun drawing — delivered in a style unlike any other in the magazine’s stable.

Lars Kenseth’s astronauts drawing (p. 58). I’ll just say it:  Mr. Kenseth’s drawing made me laugh out loud.

Sofia Warren’s Charles Addamsy drawing (p. 63).  A good deal of information to absorb, well-handled.

Glen Baxter’s lion in a museum (p. 48). I’m a sucker for (what seem like) bolt-of-lightning drawings. By that I mean drawings that seem instantaneously transferred to us from the artist without labor (Jack Ziegler was a master of the form). I could be completely wrong: perhaps Mr. Baxter spent hours and days developing this particular cartoon. It’s become a favorite Baxter drawing.

David Borchart’s drawing (p.44) is a fine addition to the magazine’s desert island canon. May desert island drawings never end.

From one who loves castles (and drawing them), nice to see Jeremy Nguyen’s different take (p.25).

A newbie in this issue: Yael Green makes her debut appearance (p.74). Ms. Green is the 23rd new cartoonist brought into the fold this year, and the 49th since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Here’s Mr. Irvin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Rea Irvin  Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

The classic Talk masthead by Mr Irvin that ran for 92 consecutive years  is shown above. It was replaced by a redraw (!) in the Spring of 2017. It’s never too late to bring it back.

 

 

Many Many Coffees Ago At The New Yorker; The Tilley Watch Online, Sept. 30 – October 4, 2019

Many Many Coffees Ago At The New Yorker

Here’s a fun photo I came across in the Spill’s archives. Taken in 1987 at The New Yorker‘s long-time offices at 25 West 43rd Street.*

Left to right: Roz Chast, yours truly, Liza Donnelly, Sam Gross, and Mick Stevens. The occasion may have been the art department’s annual holiday party.

*Below:  a Spill map showing The New Yorker‘s various locations in its 94 years.

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The Tilley Watch Online, September 30 – October 4, 2019

An end of the week listing of New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to the Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Brooke Bourgeois, Brendan Loper (two appearances), David Sipress, and Pat Byrnes.

Daily Shouts: Ellis Rosen (with Annelise Capossela), Jeremy Nguyen (with Thatcher Jensen), Julia Wertz, and Amy Hwang.

 

Tonight’s Events Of Interest: Liana Finck & Emily Flake in Conversation, Drew Friedman & Robert Klein In Conversation; More Thurber; Fave Photo Of The Day; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Liana Finck will be in conversation with Emily Flake this evening at Books Are Magic. All the info here.

Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013.  Her latest book is Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, And Notes To Self (Random House).  Ms. Flake has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2008. Her book That Was Awkward: The Art And Etiquette of the Awkward Hug is out from Viking, October 15th.

And…

Over at The Strand tonight, Drew Friedman will be in conversation with comedian Robert Klein. All the info here.

New Yorker readers will no doubt remember Mr. Friedman’s New Yorker  cover of January 26, 2009.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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More Thurber

From WOSU Public Radio, this conversation with Michael Rosen and Sara Thurber Sauers on the occasion of the Columbus, Ohio Thurber exhibit and publication of A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber (Ohio State University Press).

James Thurber’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Thurber Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Link here to JamesThurber.org

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Fave Photo Of The Day

Roz Chast and Neil Goldberg on stage at last night’s Museum of the City of New York event.  Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978.

Photo courtesy of Marcie Jacobs-Cole

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Attention-getting, by Brendan Loper.