The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 3, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Cover: a snowy bridge. Read the Q&A with the cover artist here, and see the pretty digital snowflakes fall.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

In a throw back to earlier Monday Tilley Watches, I’ll take a quick tour through all the cartoons in the issue; a mostly text-driven drive-by of the work.

The first drawing, by David Sipress, references the recent demise of Mr. Peanut (is he really gone, or was it just a dream?). The topic of the late legume was recently covered here.

…Julia Suits’s pirate in cargo shorts on a gangplank is next (cannot see cargo shorts/pants on a New Yorker cartoon character without thinking of the below cargo pants drawing by the late great Leo Cullum — it appeared in The New Yorker,  August 17, 1998:

…The third cartoon (oh, alright: drawing) in the issue belongs to Barbara Smaller, who’s been contributing to the magazine since 1996.  A bedroom, a married couple, and a reasonable question.

…next is a Zach Kanin poker game (assuming it’s poker — I see chips on the table). I really like the three card players Mr. Kanin has drawn. The fellow to the left looks a little like Ernest Borgnine (with a pinch of Broderick Crawford tossed in?):

To me, the guy on the far right resembles Mandy Patinkin.

…next up: Liana Finck on an age-old flooring concern. Nice floating ghost.

…Harry Bliss and one of his collaborators (Steve Martin) address a potential problem for passengers on one of those floating mini-cities sailing the seven seas.

…five pages later: an Emily Flake drawing far far removed from her usual style and cartoon concerns. Think Hindenburg disaster mashed with social media done in a sort of Stuart Leeds style.

…on page 45, a Tersa Burns Parkhurst retirement party. Dunno why but the cartoon reminds me of MAD magazine’s Dave Berg’s “Lighter Side Of…” drawings (that’s a good thing!).

…on page 43 is a drawing by Mick Stevens, one of the most veteran artists in this issue.  He began contributing in December of 1979 (Roz Chast in this issue with a full page color Sketchbook, beats him out by more than a year– her first drawing appeared in June of 1978).  I wonder if the male dancing bird in Mr. Stevens’s drawing was originally in color. Either way (color, or b&w), a fab cartoon.

…David Borchart’s auto rental drawing (page 43) gets a Spill gold star for the use of the word “rassle.” Zeke, the fellow that’s prepared to rassle, is also mighty terrific.

…On page 54 is an Ed Steed drawing that at first glance reminds me of Zach Kanin’s in this same issue, but only because, in both drawings, the viewer is seeing a table front and center and from near precisely the same angle. Instead of card players (as seen in Mr. Kanin’s drawing) we have animated garden utensils and tools. They’re plotting something.

…next up is a Robert Leighton drawing of mountain climbers.  I love how Mr. Leighton has immediately tossed us into a situation that would normally demand the best possible equipment available. You gotta feel for the climber who came unprepared.

…Thoroughly enjoyed  — as usual with Lars Kenseth’s work — his drawing of campers situated down on the ground, and in much nicer weather than Mr. Leighton’s. Look at the care he took in adding the reflection of the moon on the lake.

…next up is a three panel hat x-ray drawing by Liza Donnelly ( who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982). This drawing answers the oft-asked question of what could possibly occupy all that beanie air space. Love the kitty!

Lastly, Adam Douglas Thompson (the most junior artist in this issue — his first drawing appeared in The New Yorker in the issue of April 8, 2019) gives us a sort of contemporary Chon Day drawing (it’s on page 68). “Sort of” because Mr. Thompson’s line and Mr. Day’s line have different flows.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

This man (Rea Irvin) is wondering what happened to his beautiful Talk masthead design (shown below). You know — the one that appeared in The New Yorker for 92 years, not the re-draw that’s been around since May of 2017.  Who took the iconic masthead away, and why, and where oh where can it be? Actually, the answer to the first question is easy. Perhaps the last question is easy as well.  It likely resides in a file on a desktop, easily accessed. The question of why is the puzzler. Read more about its disappearance here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Daily Cartoon: by Brendan Loper, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

…and a Daily Shouts by J. A. K., who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

 

Mr. Peanut Shelled 20 Years Ago; Article Of Interest: Rich Sparks; The Surreal McCoy’s “Wolf of Baghdad” Out Next Week; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Mr. Peanut Shelled 20 Years Ago

Apparently, I was, unusually, way ahead of a developing story.  Here’s a drawing of mine published by The New Yorker in 2000 (it was within a double issue: Dec. 25, 2000/January 1, 2001).

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Article Of Interest: Rich Sparks

From Chicago Magazine, January 22, 2020, “The Weird, Whimsical World Of Rich Sparks”

— this article on Mr. Sparks who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here. 

His new book, Love And Other Weird Things, published by Yoe Books, will be out January 28.

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The Surreal McCoy’s “Wolf Of Baghdad” Out Next Week

Out next week from Carol Isaacs (aka The Surreal McCoy) is The Wolf Of Baghdad (Myriad). Visit the publisher’s website here for an excerpt and a lot of info.

Ms. Isaacs tells the Spill: “The motion comic (animated) version of the book will be premiered at the Sephardi Jewish Film Festival in New York next month and I’ll be over to do a talk and Q&A.”

Details will be posted here when they become available.

Ms. Isaacs began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014. Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Jon Adams on the passing of a legume. Mr. Adams began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017. Visit his website here.

The Wednesday Spill: New Yorker Folks At SXSW 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Fave Photo Of The Day

New Yorker Folks At SXSW 2020

From SXSW’s schedule, here are several events featuring various New Yorker folks.

On March 14th, 2020, a talk by veteran New Yorker cartoonist, Liza Donnelly: ‘Humor Connects Us”  

On March 15, 2020, “New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality” with the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, cartoonist Liana Finck, and others.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper on moving the impeachment hearings.

Mr. Loper has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.

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Fave Photo Of The Day

Here’s a photo from the Spill archives of a family cat settled down in front of a Jack Ziegler original. The drawing, titled The Jungle Never Sleeps, appeared in The New Yorker,  July 28, 1980.

 

Today’s Daily Cartoon, The Weekend Daily Shouts Cartoonist, And The Fave Photo Of The Day

A snowsuit via Carolita Johnson, and a weekend Shouts piece by Navied Mahdavian

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Fave Photo Of The Day

    Here’s Patricia Marx & Roz Chast last week at the great Strand bookstore celebrating the publication of their latest collaboration, You Can Yell At Me For One Thing At A Time: Rules For Couples

Their previous book:

Photo courtesy of Marcie Jacobs-Cole

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of January 27, 2020; David Salle Incorporates Peter Arno Drawings

The Cover: A NYC subway situation, by Luci Gutierrez.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Every first run through the cartoons in the latest issue of The New Yorker  I feel as if I’m browsing the goods behind glass in a pastry shop’s display case, appreciating the variety, before beginning to narrow down which one to select, if in the buying mood. In this new issue, a number of pastries caught my eye. In no particular order here are some favorites.

…Sofia Warren’s four part color piece (it’s on page 36) fits nicely in the New Yorker school of cartoons that go beyond eliciting a laugh, capturing a lovely moment.  An earlier example of one of those moments is Arnie Levin’s classic multi-panel New Yorker drawing, “It’s only the wind”  from September 18, 1978 (it originally ran across the top of two facing pages, four panels to a page):

…Christopher Weyant’s  drawing on page 40, of a fellow leaving his blimp at a parking garage, is a text book example of the classic New Yorker one-two punch cartoon (as defined by Peter Arno).

…On page 22 you’ll find Danny Shanahan’s terrific drawing of cats with a tech problem.

…A perfect look on the guy’s face who’s tasting olive oil in Lars Kenseth’s cartoon (p. 42).  As mentioned on the Spill not long ago, veteran New Yorker cartoonist Henry Martin once said to me that certain cartoonists “draw funny” — it was meant as a compliment. Mr. Kenseth draws funny.

…The woman standing beside Liana Finck’s former dog walker (p.55) ever-so-slightly echoes Edward Gorey’s elongated figures. Ms. Finck’s drawings remind me, in a way, of Michael Shaw’s — the lines delivered as if direct from the muse.

…also in the issue: Insecure(?) Gods (by Hartley Lin), an update on Dolly,  the cloned sheep (Navied Mahdavian), criminals in an alleyway (Frank Cotham), a comet denier dinosaur (Jessica Olien), trash in space (Roz Chast), a couple in basement counting babysitter money (Amy Hwang), a doctor’s brainy children (Paul Noth), and a possible game changer (Liam Walsh).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:  A–gasp!– redraw of Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead design has been in place since the Spring of 2017.

If granted three cartoon wishes, one of them would be the return of Mr. Irvin’s work to its home of 92 years.  Read about the switcheroo here.

The missing masthead appears below.

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David Salle Incorporates Arno Drawings

From Creative Boom, January 20, 2020, “Vibrant paintings inspired by advertising and cartoons from The New Yorker in the 1950s” — this piece on David Salle (fabulously!) incorporating  Peter Arno drawings within his paintings.

Shown above: Mr. Salle’s “A Night In The Sky With Friends”