Personal History: Mother’s Day

 

My mother once told me that Mother’s Day was more important to her than her own birthday.  Thinking of her today, I can’t help but think of the world she grew up in, especially during her formative years from the 1920s through 1950s. Hers was not the world of the arts, but of a factory job right after high school, and later, jobs taken to put food on the table for her three kids (my father was basically a no-show). She worked a luncheonette counter, and at a doughnut shop.  She worked in an ancient dark red brick factory near our home, where she assembled electrical parts whizzing by on an assembly line.  She joined the local police force as a crossing guard, wearing a dark blue uniform and a badge.

At home, at the end of her work day, she’d return to her three young boys and her husband-less home. I spent those after-school early evening hours laying on our living room floor drawing; she left me alone in my little paper and pencil world, never commenting on what I was working on.  But one day, when I was about seven years old, she broke her silence. It’s very possible she was worried;  perhaps she wondered where all this drawing was going — how would I make a living drawing soldiers and cowboys and angry dragons; and why wasn’t I down at the park playing with all the other kids, or doing homework?

And so, on that late afternoon, she spoke up.  “If someone asked you to draw a guy about to slip on a banana peel, you could do that, right?”  I answered, “Yes” (thankfully I didn’t tell her that I hated the thought of someone telling me what to draw).  All these many many years (and many many drawings) later, I continue to appreciate and value her beautiful parental mix of support and real world concern: “…you could do that, right?” 

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist: John Cuneo; Cover Revealed For Marisa Acocella’s “The Big She-Bang”; A Graphic Novel By Robert Grossman; Christopher Weyant’s New Book; Article Of Interest: Liam Walsh; Today’s Daily Shouts… By Ellie Black; More Spills…Ken Krimstein, Edward Koren

Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

John Cuneo, who has this week’s New Yorker cover, gets toady.  Visit Mr. Cuneo’s website here.

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Cover Revealed For Marisa Acocella’s “Big She Bang”

And now we have a cover for The Big She-Bang: The Herstory of the Universe According to God the Mother as Told to Marisa Acocella.  Out November 19, 2019, from Harper Wave.  Ms. Acocella began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998. She is the author of the New York Times best seller, Ann Tenna, and Cancer Vixen (named one of The Times top ten graphic memoirs).  Visit her website here.

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A Graphic Novel By Robert Grossman

Out May 21 from the late great Robert Grossman (he died in 2018), Life On The Moon (Yoe Books). Read all about it here.

Mr. Grossman began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962.  Not only a cartoonist at the magazine, he was also for a short time, assistant to James Geraghty, the New Yorker’s art editor. Visit Mr. Grossman’s website here.

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Another Form  Christopher Weyant and Anna Kang Weyant

We Are (Not) Friends is the fourth in the series from Chris Weyant and Anna Kang.  Published May 1, 2019 (Two Lions).  Mr. Weyant began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.  Visit his website here.

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Article of Interest: Liam Walsh

From weheartwriting, April 30, 2109, “It Started at the Library — Liam Francis Walsh”

A brief article by Mr. Walsh, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011.  His new book,  Make A Wish, Henry Bear, is out this week. Visit his website here.

(my thanks to Bob Eckstein for sending this piece to the Spill)

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Today’s Daily Shouts…

...ridesharing by Ellie Black. Ms. Black began contributing to The New Yorker this year.

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…Edward Koren’s latest book, In The Wild wins gold at the 2019 IBPA Benjamin Franklin Awards (“celebrating excellence in book editorial and design, the IBPA Benjamin Franklin Awards are sponsored by the Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA).” Read about it here

Mr. Koren began contributing to The New Yorker in 1964.  Visit his website here.

 

 

…Ken Krimstein’s Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt has been named a finalist for the 2019 Chautauqua Prize (the first graphic novel to be named a finalist for this award). Read all about it here.

Mr. Krimstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2000.  Visit his website here.

Easter In The City; Today’s Daily Shouts By…Ellis Rosen With Irving Ruan

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Here’s a rejected cover idea (submitted to The New Yorker way way back in time) that I’ve brought out on this day a number of times. I remember being happy with the way the checkered floor turned out (heavily inspired by Charles Addams’ handling of tiled floors).

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Today’s Daily Shouts

Today’s Daily Shouts is a joint effort by Ellis Rosen and Irving Ruan.  Mr. Ellis began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit Mr. Ellis’s website here.