Blog Posts Of Interest From Mike Lynch; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…and Yesterday’s); Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Blog Posts Of Interest From Mike Lynch

   Cartoonist Mike Lynch has posted two back-to-back New Yorker items of interest on his blog. Today’s is a look at some of Steinberg’s drawings from All In Line (the 1947 paperback edition), and yesterday a piece on a film about New Yorker cover artist Andre Francois. See them here.

Steinberg’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Saul Steinberg Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

Andre Francois’s entry on the A-Z:

Andre Francois (photo: 1978) Birth/death information from his New York Times obit of April 15, 2005: Born Andre Farkas, 1915, Timisoara. Died, April, 2005, Grisy-les-Platres, France.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…and Yesterday’s)

Emily Bernstein, who began contributing to The New Yorker in July of last year, on shopping now. Yesterday’s Daily was by Emily Flake, who began contributing to the magazine in 2007.

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Yesterday’s Daily Shouts

A trio effort by cartoonist Jeremy Nguyen, along with writers Irving Raun, and Julia Edelman. Mr. Nguyen began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of March 23, 2020: No GOAT

The Cover: This week’s cover, by Christoph Niemann is right on the money. The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, has a Q&A with the artist here.

Historical Note:  this is the first issue of The New Yorker  not to include a Goings On About Town section. A notice appears on this week’s Table of Contents.

A potted history of GOAT (as it’s sometimes affectionately called)

The very first issue of The New Yorker  included a “conscientious calendar of events worth while” called Goings On.  The very first Goings On was just one page, near the back of the book. Below is the heading of that first Goings On.

The Goings On heading survived up through the issue of October 31, 1925. Goings On About Town was used for the very first time in the next issue (November 7, 1925). Goings On About Town was moved to the very front of the magazine in the issue of January 23, 1926.

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And now back to the present…and this week’s issue.

The Cartoonists:

Once again, I’ve posted the entire listing of artists as this week’s Spots are by the fab cover artist, Marcellus Hall.

There is a newbie this week: Matilda Borgstrom, who is the third new cartoonist to enter The New Yorker‘s stable of cartoonists this year, and the fifty-sixth new cartoonist brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

The Cartoons:

There are, as you would expect, a number of cartoons (“Drawings”) this week reflecting directly or indirectly the times we’re in: Roz Chast’s store front sign referencing hand sanitizer and face masks, Frank Cotham’s castle cleaning crew, Liza Donnelly’s kitchen full of fermented food, Emily Flake’s monster coming out of a closet.

The remaining cartoons take us away for awhile– as we’d want them to; the variety includes a mermaid, a couple of cowboys, a typing kitty, stargazers…and more.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Virus, or no virus, the watch continues. Read about Mr. Irvin’s moth-balled iconic Talk masthead here.

Here’s what we’re no longer seeing:

 

 

The Wall Street Journal Rewrites A Pat Byrnes Cartoon Caption; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The Wall Street Journal Rewrites A Pat Byrnes Cartoon Caption

Long time New Yorker cartoonist Pat Byrnes (he began contributing in 1998) posted the following on Facebook this afternoon:

Last Friday, the Wall Street Journal ran the cartoon below on the right. On the left is the original caption. They bought it in November, 2017. I wrote it months before that. And I acknowledge that times have changed since then.
I can understand if they had political discomfort with it.
But people will read this caption and think I was responsible for it. I wrote to WSJ early yesterday registering my objection and requesting a response. They have not responded.
The edited caption is insipid and utterly lacking in wit. Mine was no “instant classic,” but neither was it amateurish hack work. In my letter, I requested that WSJ contact me before future edits. I promised to rewrite, swap out a new cartoon, or refund payment. Anything not to have my work devalued so publicly.
My purpose with this post is simply to leave a public record that I was not responsible for that dreadfully lame caption.
In a follow-up Facebook post, Mr. Byrnes wrote:
Moments ago, I heard back from the cartoon editor:
“I want to assure you that, henceforth, your captions for our WSJournal feature will NEVER be altered without your approval.
“Very sorry about the mishap.”
This is from their longtime cartoon editor, who has frequently bought cartoons that challenge the standard image of the Journal. I respect him entirely. He works independently, from Florida. And I suspect—that is, I do not know, but merely suspect—that he is taking the fall for this, even though the change was made in New York, without his foreknowledge.
In any case, out of respect for him, I accept the matter as resolved. Thank you all for letting me vent.
And following-up the follow-up,  Mr. Byrnes tells The Spill that he accepted the WSJ apology, emailing his editor there:
“I’ve always had great respect for how you frequently choose the material that challenges the paper’s more predictable paradigms. And I will always try to give you my very best.”
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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

 

Good school yard advice by Pat Achilles. Ms. Achilles began contributing to The New Yorker in October of 2018. Visit her blog here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 16, 2020

The Cover: Talk about yer timely cover: you might think that the cover on the left, by I. G. Haupt, is this week’s New Yorker cover, but it’s not. It appeared August 31, 1929*, not too long before “Black Monday”; the cover on the right appears this week on the magazine — “The Spring & Style” Issue. I’m reminded of The Rolling Stones song, Dandelion, and its catchy “Blow away dandelion, blow away dandelion.”

*Oddly, the Aug.29, 1929 issue is not included in the magazine’s digital archive available to subscribers. If you go to the archive, and look through the 1929 issues you’ll see there’s a gap between the issue of August 24, 1929 (Helen Hokinson cover) and September 7, 1929 (Sue Williams cover). Luckily, I have a copy, but what if you don’t.

The Cartoonists:

As with the other week, I’m showing the entire list of Artists as the Spots artist is Benoit van Innis who has provided a number of splendid covers over the years.

The Cartoons:

A truly wonderful drawing in this issue by Ed Steed (it’s on page 46), and a very clever idea by Will McPhail on page 38. Other drawings that caught my eye: P.C. Vey’s what’s under the bed cartoon (page 36), Drew Panckeri’s lion in a barber shop (p. 69), and Liana Finck’s fitbit drawing (p.66).

 

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

The above has not been seen in The New Yorker since May of 2017.  Read about it here.

 

All New Yorker Cartoons Are New Yorker Drawings But Not All New Yorker Drawings Are New Yorker Cartoons; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s)

In a fun February 22nd 2020 post on The Daily Cartoonist celebrating the first appearance of James Thurber’s drawings in The New Yorker (shown above), the post’s author D.D. Degg wrote this:

There seems to be some disagreement over whether the above drawings constitute cartoons. A New Yorker State of Mind, where the above screenshot comes from, calls them cartoons; whereas others disagree, calling them spot art. Cartoonist and New Yorker cartoon historian Michael Maslin claims the first real Thurber cartoon appeared in the January 3, 1931 issue (below).

To use language we’ve been hearing a lot of in Democratic debates: my name was invoked, so I would like to respond.

There really shouldn’t be “some disagreement over whether the above drawings constitute cartoons.”  Using the New Yorker‘s language for referring to cartoons, in usage for 95 years, there are two ways one can go when referring to the magazine’s cartoons: you can call them cartoons, or you can call them drawings (and well yes, there’s a third descriptive:  some call them “art”). The magazine “officially” refers to them as drawings (you can see the designation on every Table Of Contents). There are three kinds of New Yorker cartoon formats: with a title (and that could mean a series of cartoons linked by a theme — all appearing in a spread. Booth, Ziegler, Levin, and Saxon, to name a few, were responsible for some terrific spreads over the years); with a caption; without a caption. I’ll show you three of mine as examples:

With a caption:

Without a caption:

With a title:

All of the above are cartoons, and they are also drawings. They all appeared in the magazine, surrounded in some part by text, but not linked to the text in any way other than graphic proximity. In Thurber’s Pet Department piece at the top of this post, the drawings are accompanying the text — the piece as a whole set off by a horizontal and vertical line. The seal, and the dog exist in Thurber’s piece to illustrate the text surrounding them. New Yorker cartoons, historically, do not reflect, or refer to, or illustrate the text surrounding them.  In Thurber’s Pet Department drawings there is no “one-two punch” with either drawing (according to Peter Arno, that one-two punch is an essential element of a New Yorker cartoon). The wonderful Thurber dog and seal, if removed from the accompanying text, and left on their own, would still be fun drawings (hey, they’re Thurber drawings after all). They might make us laugh; we may find it amusing that a seal is in a room with a table and lamp (I know I do). But if the drawings had been submitted as cartoons, sans accompanying text, I doubt the editors would’ve bought and run them as a stand alone drawing/cartoons (Spots maybe). There’s not enough cartoon there.

Another sliver from Mr. Degg’s post, referring specifically to Thurber’s dog and seal:

“…whereas others disagree, calling them spot art.”

New Yorker spot drawings are free range graphic pieces, not illustrating the text surrounding them (in modern times they sometimes do refer to an issue’s theme, if the issue is thematic), thus Thurber’s dog and seal are not New Yorker spot drawings.

Finally, Mr. Degg’s says:

“…Michael Maslin claims the first real Thurber cartoon appeared in the January 3, 1931 issue…”

My information concerning Thurber’s first New Yorker cartoon comes from Edwin T. Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography, published by Ohio State University Press in 1968. In all the years (close to 40 now) I’ve used this as a reference, I’ve yet to find an error.  While I heavily rely on Mr. Bowden’s good work, I also comb through back issues of The New Yorker.  In all of my combing, I’ve never found an earlier Thurber New Yorker cartoon than the one Mr. Bowden designated as the first ( that cartoon appeared in the issue of January 31, 1931).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper on getting directions.

Mr. Loper has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.

Yesterday’s Daily: Avi Steinberg on a warm February.

Mr. Steinberg has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2012.