The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of June 22, 2020

The CoverHere’s the magazine’s feature exploring this exceptionally powerful cover by Kadir Nelson.

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

First, a little paperwork: sorry the screen grab above is fuzzy. I’ll attempt to fix before the day is done.

Thirteen cartoons this week, plus a full page Sketchbook by Barry Blitt. Two of the cartoons caught my eye this week. The first is by Ellis Rosen (it’s on page 78). It’s an idea that beautifully blends a past time situation oft seen in the magazine  — the writer in the coffee shop — with our present time. A rock-solid idea, well executed. And, not least, funny. And that also describes Maggie Larson’s ice cream truck and gelato truck drawing (p.84): it’s an evergreen cartoon — it will be understood and enjoyed for years to come.  Applause, applause!

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

I’d love to report that the above Rea Irvin iconic design has returned as the magazine’s Talk heading, but nooooo. Read about its removal here.

 

The Wednesday Watch: Al Frueh’s Stage Folk; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Al Frueh’s Stage Folk

Here’s a true oddity, and an expensive one at that: Al Frueh’s Stage Folk: A Book of Caricatures, published in 1922. A copy  went for a little over a thousand bucks when sold by Hakes Auction in 2010.

I know what some of you might think: The New Yorker didn’t begin publishing until 1925, so why is a book published in 1922 of interest. Some Frueh context:

The very first cartoon in the very first issue of The New Yorker was by Al Frueh.* He was also responsible for the magazine’s second cover.** He never had another, but in his case perhaps once was enough as he was to carve out a space and a place in the magazine for nearly four decades (1925-1962) as its theatrical caricaturist (according to this Illustration Age piece, Frueh “contributed four hundred and seventy theatre caricatures and some four hundred other illustrations and cartoons for the magazine”).

His four hundred and seventy theatre caricatures brings us back to Stage Folk, published three years before Frueh began his long run at The New Yorker.  As explained by Frueh himself in the Hakes copy, he hand printed all but one of the 37 prints in the book, which was limited to 500 copies. Frueh’s work in Stage Folk  (which I assume appeared in the New York World, his home before The New Yorker) is the same wonderful minimalist flowing style The New Yorker readership enjoyed for so many years. Two examples from Stage Folk: below, left, Ethel Barrymore, and right, George M. Cohan.

* and **: Below left, Mr. Frueh’s drawing in the first issue of The New Yorker, February 21, 1925; below right, Frueh’s cover for the magazine’s second issue, February 28, 1925.

More Frueh

For those wanting more about Frueh, there’s Frueh On The Theatre: Theatrical Caricatures 1906-1962, a catalog from The New York Public Library, published in 1972  (preface by Brendan Gill).

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Tim Hamilton on secret tactics.

Mr. Hamilton has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016. Visit his website here.

 

Gil Roth Interview Of Interest: Liza Donnelly; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Gil Roth continues his daily covid conversations on his Virtual Memories Show.  Yesterday’s guest was long-time New Yorker contributor, Liza Donnelly. Listen here.

Ms. Donnelly’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Liza Donnelly (pictured above) Born, Washington, D.C. New Yorker work: June 21, 1982 – Key book: Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Edited:  Sex & Sensibility: Ten Women Examine the Lunacy of Modern Love…in 200 Cartoons ( Twelve, 2008). Co-authored with Michael Maslin: Husbands & Wives ( Ballantine 1995), Call Me When You Reach Nirvana ( Andrew & McMeel, 1995), Cartoon Marriage ( with Michael Maslin) (Random House, 2009), When Do They Serve the Wine?( Chronicle, 2010). Women On Men (Narrative Library, 2013). Donnelly also wrote and illustrated a popular series of dinosaur books for children ( Dinosaur Day, Dinosaur Beach, Dinosaur Halloween, etc.) all published by Scholastic.  She is the CBS News Resident Cartoonist. Website: http://www.lizadonnelly.com

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Elisabeth McNair on the end not near. Ms. McNair began contributing to The New Yorker July of 2018. Visit her website here.

 

Fave Photo Of The Day: Zoomin’ New Yorker Cartoonists; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…and Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; The Holiday Daily Cartoonists

One of the things cartoonists like to do, besides work on cartoons, is gather with other cartoonists. Here’s a crew of Zoomin’ New Yorker cartoonists that gathered yesterday: from top left, going clockwise: Robert Leighton, Bob Eckstein, Ken Krimstein, and Pat Byrnes.

Mr. Leighton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002; Bob Eckstein in 2007;

Ken Krimstein in 2000; Pat Byrnes in 1998.

— My thanks to Bob Eckstein for the screen grab.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist…and The Holiday Daily Cartoonists:

Today’s: Eugenia Vita (with Ginny Hogan): “Initial Interpretations Of Quarantine Terms Before I Knew What They Meant”Eugenia Viti has contributed cartoons to The New Yorker since June of last year.

The Holiday Daily Shouts Cartoonist: Sofia Warren with “How My Misdirected Feelings Have Come Out Lately”…Ms. Warren has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017.

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist:

Today’s: Amy Hwang on the calendar these days.

Ms. Hwang has contributed to The New Yorker since 2010.

The Holiday Daily Cartoonist: Johnny DiNapoli, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2019.

Alan Dunn’s New Yorker Honor Roll; The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of June 1, 2020

Above: The New Yorker War Cartoons  1945 Special Edition For The Armed Forces.  For more on The New Yorker‘s special war editions go here.

The  above War Cartoons cover by Alan Dunn originally appeared on The New Yorker issue of August 11, 1945. Nearly a year later Mr. Dunn revisited the Honor Roll with this cover of July 27, 1946:

Mr. Dunn’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Alan Dunn (self portrait above from Meet the Artist) Born in Belmar, New Jersey, August 11, 1900, died in New York City, 1975. NYer work: 1926 – 1974 Key collections: Rejections (Knopf, 1931), Who’s Paying For This Cab? (Simon & Schuster, 1945), A Portfolio of Social Cartoons ( Simon & Schuster, 1968). One of the most published New Yorker cartoonists (1,906 cartoons) , Mr. Dunn was married to Mary Petty — together they lived and worked at 12 East 88th Street, where, according to the NYTs, Alan worked “seated in a small chair at a card table, drawing in charcoal and grease pencil.”

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The Cover:

And on into June with another cover (we are told) reflecting this strange time. You might not know this cover was presented to us as timely without knowing the title (“Lockdown Sampler”). Without the title, in a different time, we would likely see this cover, as William Steig once defined (pre-Tina Brown) New Yorker covers, as a “special moment — fleetingly observed.”

Read a short Q&A with Roz Chast here about her cover.

 

The Cartoonists:

Two duo efforts in this issue, with one duo, Sophie Lucido Johnson (and, I’m taking a guess here on this link:) Sammi Skolmoski new to the cartoonist stable. The Spill custom is to count a duo as one new entry on the A-Z, which means the Johnson/Skolmoski duo are the 9th newbies so far this year, and the 62nd newbies brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship (begun in May of 2017).

The Cartoons: a number jump out for me — five to be exact. Curiously (or not) they appear in a row, beginning with Emily Flake’s clowns about to pie throw (perhaps my favorite Flake drawing ever), followed by Lars Kenseth’s airport baggage moment, then Danny Shanahan’s fab accessorized dinosaurs, Joe Dator’s E.T. bicycle rental scenario, and finally Farley Katz’s Sunset Boulevard-ish” Instagram drawing.

See the slideshow of this week’s drawings here (if you scroll down a bit).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Regular Spill visitors will recognize that every Monday Tilley Watch ends with the Irvin Talk Masthead Watch.  Mr. Irvin’s classic design is still missing (it went away in the Spring of 2017, replaced by a…gasp!…redraw…read about it here). Here’s Mr. Irvin’s mothballed classic design: