The Weekend Spill: The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of January 13-17, 2020; A Note About Next Week’s New Yorker

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An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Brendan Loper (twice), Mort Gerberg, David Sipress, J.A.K.

Daily Shouts: Olivia de Recat & Julia Edelman, Emily Flake

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

To see all of the above and more go here.

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A Note About Next Week’s New Yorker

Oddly, the digital edition of next week’s issue (January 27, 2020) has appeared two days early. Although it’s out today, I’m going to stick to the usual Monday posting of commentary on the cartoons.

In the meantime here’s the cover, by Luci Gutierrez, and the line-up of cartoonists in the issue:

 

 

 

David Preston’s Three New Yorker Covers; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

David Preston’s Three New Yorker Covers

This grey day seemed like a good time to recall David Preston’s three New Yorker covers — all of them from the pre-buzz era when “quiet” New Yorker covers were plentiful. Below is Mr. Preston’s bio as it appeared at the 2015 Westport Historical Society exhibit, Cover Story: The New Yorker In Westport.

And here, courtesy of Sarah Geraghty Herndon, is a photo from late 1965 taken at James Geraghty’s home in Westport, Connecticut.  Mr. Preston is seated far right. Standing next to Mr. Preston is Charles Saxon. Partially obscured behind the young fellow in the white shirt is Whitney Darrow, Jr..

Further info from the Spill‘s A-Z:

Whitney Darrow, Jr. Born August 22, 1909, Princeton, NJ. Died August, 1999, Burlington, Vermont. New Yorker work: 1933 -1982. Quote (Darrow writing of himself in the third person): …in 1931 he moved to New York City, undecided between law school and doing cartoons as a profession. The fact that the [New Yorker’s] magazine offices were only a few blocks away decided him…” (Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943)

Charles Saxon (Born in Brooklyn, NY,  Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. New Yorker work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

 

James Geraghty * (photo: Geraghty in his office at The New Yorker, 25 West 43rd St., 1948. Used with permission of Sarah Geraghty Herndon). Born Spokane, Washington, 1904. died Venice, Florida, January, 1983. While not a cartoonist, Geraghty’s contribution to the art of the New Yorker was substantial. He contributed material to cartoonists before and during his association with The New Yorker, where he served as art editor from 1939 until 1973, when the title passed to Lee Lorenz. In Geraghty’s NYTs obit (Jan 20, 1983), William Shawn said: “Along with Harold Ross, who was the first editor of the magazine, Geraghty set the magazine’s comic art on its course and he helped determine the direction in which the comic art would go and is still going.”

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Mort Gerberg on politics and news. Mr. Gerberg has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1965.

Visit his website here.

Fave Photo Of The Day: A Dozen New Yorker Cartoonists At Lunch; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s); Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Roz Chast & Patricia Marx’s 2020 Book Tour Schedule

Fave Photo Of The Day: New Yorker Cartoonists At Lunch

New Yorker cartoonists get together all the time, usually in groups of two or three. Every so often there’s a larger crowd, like today’s gathering of a dozen on Manhattan’s upper east side. They’re pictured above (the year each cartoonist began contributing to the magazine appears beside their name).

Seated, left to right: Warren Miller (1961), Nick Downes (1998), and Bob Eckstein (2007). Standing, left to right: John O’Brien (1987), Mort Gerberg (1965), Sam Gross (1969), Robert Leighton (2002), David Borchart (2007), Danny Shanahan (1988), Roz Chast (1978), Liza Donnelly (1982), and yours truly (1977).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

David Sipress on tonight’s Democratic Presidential debate. Mr. Sipress has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998. __________________________________

Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

J.A.K. on Best Picture nominees. Mr. K. has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2014. His latest book is Everything Is An Emergency: An OCD Story in Words & Pictures (HarperCollins).

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Today’s Daily Shouts:

“Introducing Meghan And Harry’s Etsy Shop” by Emily Flake, who began contributing her cartoons to The New Yorker in 2008.

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Roz Chast & Patricia Marx’s 2020 Book Tour Schedule

Roz Chast’s Book Tour Began yesterday. Tonight she’s at The Strand. Her latest book is You Can Only Yell At Me For One Thing At A Time: Rules For Couples, co-authored with Patricia Marx.

(This image found on Stephen Nadler’s Facebook page (he of Attempted Bloggery). Thanks, Mr. N.)

 

Fave Photo Of The Day: Cartoonists At Lunch

Fave Photo Of The Day: Cartoonists At Lunch

Courtesy of cartoonist (and author) Ken Krimstein, here’s a photo taken yesterday in Manhattan of seven New Yorker artists.  Beginning lower left and going clockwise: Robert Leighton, Mort Gerberg, Sam Gross, Warren Miller, Tracey Berglund, Sid Harris, and the aforementioned Mr. Krimstein.

Robert Leighton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002, Mort Gerberg in 1965, Sam Gross in 1969, Warren Miller in 1959, Tracey Burgland contributes to newyorker.com, Sid Harris began contributing to The New Yorker in 1961, and Ken Krimstein in 2000.

James Stevenson Documentary Film “Lost And Found” Draws New Yorker Cartoonists; The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (Yesterday’s &Today’s); Meet The Artist (1943): James Thurber; New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality

James Stevenson Documentary Film,”Lost And Found” Draws New Yorker Cartoonists

A special screening of “Stevenson Lost And Found,” a wonderful documentary film about the late great New Yorker artist and writer, attracted  a number of cartoonists last week to the Made In New York Media Center.

Here’s the crowd, post-screening, along with the late Mr. Stevenson’s wife, Josie Merck, (who is also one of the film’s executive producers), along with the film’s director and producer, Sally Williams.

Front row, left to right: Mort Gerberg, Sofia Warren, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Jeremy Nguyen, Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Sam Gross, Cerise Zelenetz, unidentified, Josie Merck, Sally Williams, Liza Donnelly.

Back row, left to right:  Jason Chatfield, Heather Loase, Ellis Rosen, Johnny DiNapoli, Kendra Allenby, Bishakh Som, Tim Hamilton, Nick Downes, Andy Dubbin, Robert Leighton, Michael Maslin

And here’s James Stevenson’e entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time idea man, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson has long been a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He is a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s recent book, published in 2013, The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, is essential.

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The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (Yesterday’s & Today’s)

To bag or not to bag, by Lila Ash. Ms. Ash began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.

Teresa Burns Parkhurst on the work days before Thanksgiving. Ms. Parkhurst began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

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Meet The Cartoonist (1943): James Thurber

Another in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943

Thurber’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Thurber  Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

And for a lot more Thurber, go here.

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New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality

Read all about it here, and see the video! (that’s The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes — who wrote the script for the video — being Heimliched in the background by actress, Madeline Wise.