The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of November 12-16, 2018; Of Interest: Mort Gerberg Anthology and Exhibit In 2019; More Spills: Vinciguerra On “The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons”… Edward Koren’s “In The Wild”

The Daily Cartoon contributing New Yorker cartoonists for the past week: David Sipress, Peter Kuper, Jason Chatfield (with Scott Dooley), and Jason Adam Katzenstein. Not so much a Trumpian week this week.

The New Yorker cartoonist contributing to Daily Shouts: Emily Flake (with Abby Sher). 

To see all the work, link here.

________________________________________________

Out mid-January 2019 from Fantagraphics, Mort Gerberg On The Scene.  The publisher tells us that the book is a “career retrospective of Gerberg’s magazine cartoons, sketchbook drawings, and on-the-scene reportage sketches.”

According to the current issue of the National Cartoonists Society publication The National Cartoon!st [sic] Mr. Gerberg’s art will be on exhibit at The New York Historical Society in 2019. 

I’m trying to find a way to link to the excellent Gerberg interview in the issue. 

Trivia: within the interview a full page Gerberg cartoon from the October 20, 1965 New Yorker is identified as Mr. Gerberg’s first New Yorker cartoon (Mr. Gerberg  talks about the history of the cartoon in question).  In fact, Mr. Gerberg’s first New Yorker cartoon ran in April of that year (the issue of April 10th, ’65). This is it:

Link here to Mr. Gerberg’s website.

___________________________________________

…Thomas Vinciguerra, author of the wonderful Cast of Characters: Wolcott Gibbs, E.B. White, James Thurber, And The Golden Age Of The New Yorker (Norton, 2016) has reviewed the big red trope box, The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons  for The Wall Street Journal. Unfortunately, the WSJ‘s paywall gets in the way of fully reading it.  Here’s a link anyway (in case you subscribe, or wish to).

…And from Seven Days, November 14, 2018, an article on Edward Koren’s just published In The Wild

 

 

Book Of Interest: I Think, Therefore I Draw

Published a couple of weeks ago, I Think, Therefore I Draw: Understanding Philosophy Through Cartoons (Penguin) includes enough New Yorker cartoons (among a number of non-New Yorker cartoons) to mention here. The New Yorker cartoonists represented (in order of their appearance): Paul Noth, John McNamee, Tom Cheney, Danny Shanahan, P.C. Vey, David Sipress, George Booth, Avi Steinberg, Amy Hwang, Leo Cullum, Mort Gerberg, P.S. Mueller, John Klossner, Aaron Bacall, Sam Gross, “Bud” Handelsman, Lee Lorenz, Michael Maslin, Jack Ziegler, Edward Koren, Matt Diffee, Eric Lewis, Edward Frascino, and Charles Barsotti.

The authors have this (in part) to say in their introduction: “Here, then, is a collection of our favorite philosophical cartoons and our annotations about what they teach us about the Big Questions in philosophy.”

You can sample the text by going to the Amazon listing and clicking on the “Look inside” feature.

 

The Tilley Watch Online, November 5-9, 2018; Site Of Interest: A New Yorker State Of Mind; Short Interview Of Interest: Art Spiegelman

The emphasis was, of course(!), on the political this week, with at least half of the Daily Cartoons specifically Trump-centered (Farley Katz‘s Amazon drawing referencing hometown baseball and  “Midnight Cowboy” (?) was an exception).  The other contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Ellis Rosen, Kim Warp, Lars Kenseth, Brendan Loper, and Mort Gerberg.

Over on Daily Shouts, Olivia de Recat and Tom Chitty were the contributing New Yorker cartoonists (Ms. de Recat twice).

_____________________________________________________

Site Of Interest: A New Yorker State Of Mind

The always entertaining and enlightening A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker looks at the issue of October 26, 1929 (with Theodore Haupt’s beautiful cover). Key quote from this post:

Although two months remained in the decade, the New Yorker of the Roaring Twenties effectively ended with this issue, just days before a massive market crash sent the nation spiraling into the Great Depression.

Read here

__________________________________________________

Short Interview Of Interest: Art Spiegelman

From the University of Southern California’s Daily Trojan, November 9, 2018, “Art Spiegelman on comic-book stardom and the responsibility of today’s artists”

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 30: Helen Hokinson for Flit

On this always somewhat hard-to-define week between Christmas Day and New Years Day, these are the New Yorker cartoonists who figured into either the Daily cartoon or Daily Shouts:

*A Daily cartoon by Mort Gerberg:  a skier sees a warning sign(post).

*Another installment of Liana Finck’s “Dear Pepper” series on Daily Shouts.

*An animated Daily cartoon by Sharon Levy .

*Lars Kenseth’s illustrations for Rejected Versions of “The Gift of the Maji”  — a  Zack Wortman Daily Shouts piece.

All of these can be seen on newyorker.com, either here (Daily Cartoon) or here (Daily Shouts)

________________________________________________________________________________

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 30: Helen Hokinson for Flit

  Ms. Hokinson, one of the New Yorker‘s earliest stars (Peter Arno was the other) makes her second solo appearance in this series of ads with these two drawings for Flit, both from 1935.  My thanks again to SPX’s Warren Bernard for sharing these ads with us.

Helen Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)

*For more reading on Ms. Hokinson there’s no better place to go but Liza Donnelly’s  Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Foreword by Jules Feiffer.  Preface by Lee Lorenz.