Two Book Events Of Interest: David Borchart, Bob Eckstein, Nick Downes At Word; Mort Gerberg, Sofia Warren, Garry Trudeau At The New York Historical Society; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: P.C. Vey; Yesterday’s Daily Shouts… By Liana Finck; Joe Dator’s New Website!; Today’s Daily Shouts By A Trio Of Cartoonists

Next week, two events of great interest to New Yorker cartoon aficionados.

On Tuesday, April 23rd, Bob Eckstein’s promotional tour for The Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons makes a stop at Word Bookstore. Mr. Eckstein will be joined by fellow New Yorker cartoonists Nick Downes and David Borchart.  Mr. Downes began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.  Both Mr. Borchart and Mr. Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

On April 24th,  Mort Gerberg continues his promotional campaign for the recently released Mort Gerberg: On the Scene.  He’ll be joined at The New York Historical Society by Garry Trudeau, and New Yorker contributor, Sofia Warren. Mr. Gerberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 1965, Ms. Warren in 2017.   (Mr. Eckstein’s event is free; Mr. Gerberg’s costs $20.00)

_______________

Today’s Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

A smidgen of National Lampoon cartoon dna from Peter Vey.  Mr. Vey began contributing to The New Yorker in 1993.  Visit his website here

_____________

Yesterday’s Daily Shouts

The Spill is a day late again: yesterday’s Daily Shouts is part of a series by Liana Finck. Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013.

_________________

Joe Dator’s New Website!

Mr. Dator, a Spill favorite since he began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006 has a brand new website. Go see!

__________________

Today’s Daily Shouts By a Trio of Cartoonists

Amy Kurzweil, J.A.K. and Ellis Rosen teamed up for today’s Daily Shouts (this trio cartoonist effort is possibly a first for Shouts). 

Ms. Kurzweil began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016; Mr. Katzenstein in 2014; Mr. Rosen in 2016.

More MoCCA Today (With Photos) & “My First MoCCA”; David Sipress On A 1969 Harvard Protest

More MoCCA Today

At least three New Yorker cartoonist events scheduled today: Liana Finck in conversation with Gabrielle Bell; a “spotlight” on Mark Alan Stamaty; Emily Flake as part of a panel, “Narratives On Motherhood”; cover artist Ivan Brunetti in a panel on “Comics and the Teaching Artist” (right: Ms. Bell and Ms. Finck today. Courtesy of Stephen Nadler).

And more photos from today (all courtesy of Liza Donnelly, with the exception of the Mark Alan Stamaty photo.  That’s another courtesy of Stephen Nadler):

Top row, l-r: Peter Kuper, Felipe Galindo, Mark Parisi, Ellis Rosen.

Middle row: Arnold Roth & Caroline Roth, Liza Donnelly, Keith Knight.

Bottom: Mark Alan Stamaty (l), and Bill Kartalopoulos, who, among other things, is MoCCA’s Programming Director, and Series Editor for The Best American Comics series. 

My First MoCCA:  A Personal Take

Judging by the scene I dove into at yesterday’s MoCCA Fest, the appetite for, and practice of comics and cartoons is booming. The place (the Metropolitan West on West 46th Street) was at capacity, loud and energized. I took in the must-see Cartooning For Peace exhibit on the second floor (curated by The New Yorker cartoonist, Liza Donnelly) then immediately ran into Dick Buchanan (who for quite some time has been sharing his voluminous cartoon file via Mike Lynch’s site). Mr. Buchanan had told me earlier in the week  that he’d be at the fest, and would bring along a copy of a book I’d never seen before:  Bernard Wiseman’s Cartoon Countdown (published in 1959). Mr. Wiseman contributed 197 cartoons to The New Yorker, from April 19, 1947 – June 11. 1960.

In the pr copy on the first page:

This is the first book of cartoons devoted exclusively  to he Conquest of Space. Let the Russians Match That! 

(to the right: The Cartooning For Peace Exhibit)

With  thanks to Mr. Buchanan for Cartoon Countdown, it was on to a tour of the fest.

 

  The illustrator Tom Bloom was seen engaged in conversation with an exhibitor, the illustrator/educator, Steve Guernaccia blew by (he’s hard to miss, sartorially). The multitude of people, of tables laden with products bearing graphic images, posters, cards, etc., etc., was astounding. Along with me on the tour was one of my co-panelists, Danny Shanahan.  We were moving along at a good pace with the flow of the crowd when a familiar book cover on the New York Review Comics table got our attention: Saul Steinberg’s recently reissued Labyrinth (also on the table were a number of Maira Kalaman titles).  I bet Steinberg would’ve enjoyed the scene passing by his book.

Closing in on the slotted time for our panel with Mort Gerberg, we headed over to Ink48 on 11th Avenue, where the panels took place. Ran into Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery  who reminded us that Mark Alan Stamaty was signing his anniversary edition of MacDoodle Street.

Co-panelist Bob Eckstein awaited us in the Garamond Room, where we were soon joined by Marisa Acocella, and the man of the hour, Mort Gerberg. Spotted in our audience were New Yorker contributors,  R. Sikoryak, and Sophia Warren, as well as friend to all comics creators, Karen Greene of Columbia University. Below photos of the panel courtesy of Mr. Nadler (l-r, Danny Shanahan, Bob Eckstein, myself, Marisa Acocella, and Mr. Gerberg).

One of the fun things to come out of paneling with colleagues is the unexpected nugget or two of New Yorker history. As he discussed selling his first cartoon to The New Yorker back in 1965 , Mr. Gerberg told us — and this is something I had never heard, and didn’t realize was even possible — that he had talked the then art editor, James Geraghty into allowing what was supposed to be a bought idea of Mr. Gerberg’s to become a bought drawing. New Yorker history buffs know that it was routine at the magazine back then to buy ideas and give them to established cartoonists. It’s quite a thing that Mr. Gerberg, with his first sale to the magazine, was not only able to buck that well-entrenched system, but to deliver the full page below (published in October 20,1965).

  After our panel concluded we panelists stayed in the same room to attend the next panel,  “Professional Development 101: Art Directors Roundtable.” How could we not –it included our very own cartoon editor, Emma Allen. As we moved into the audience we spotted fellow colleagues, Kendra Allenby, Tracey Berglund, and cartoonist, Marc Bilgrey. Ms. Allen was joined by Matt Lubchansky (of The Nib), Alexandra Zsigmond (formerly The New York Times), Will Varner (formerly Buzzfeed), and artist/educator, Viktor Koen, who moderated.  The “101” in the panel title was accurate — we heard what the scene was like for today’s beginning illustrator/artists trying to break in. One piece of advice from Ms. Allen that stood out for me:  something that would make her laugh while looking at [written and drawn] humor for four hours in a day, had an excellent shot.

By the way, the place was packed.

_____________________

David Sipress On A Harvard Protest In 1969

Mr. Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998, has a Personal History piece on newyorker.com: “Fake News, 1969: My Slightly Infamous Role In The Harvard Antiwar Protests”

 

 

Mort Gerberg At MoCCA With Bob Eckstein, Marisa Acocella, and Danny Shanahan: Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Pat Byrnes

A friendly reminder that this Saturday at 3:00  Mort Gerberg will join New Yorker colleagues, Bob Eckstein, Marisa Acocella, and Danny Shanahan at MoCCA to celebrate the publication of Mr. Gerberg’s On The Scene: A 50 Year Cartoon Chronicle (I’ll moderate).

 All the info here!

For a complete list of all the New Yorker folks at MoCCA this weekend go here to this earlier Spill post.

(Mort Gerberg’s cartoon at the top of this post appeared in The New Yorker, June 21, 1993).

Photos above, l-r: Bob Eckstein, Marisa Acocella, Danny Shanahan, and Mort Gerberg

___________________

Today’s Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Today’s Daily cartoon, the breakfast table 2019, is by Pat Byrnes, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.  Visit his website here.

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online,The New Yorker, March 24-29, 2019: Book Of Interest: Seth’s “Clyde Fans”; Mort Gerberg’s New York Historical Society Exhibit Reviewed

    The Daily cartoons this week weren’t exclusively Trumplandish, but close! The contributing New Yorker cartoonists were: Peter Kuper, Lucas Adams, Emily Flake, J.A.K., Barry Blitt, and Christopher Weyant.

        The Daily Shouts contributing New Yorker cartoonists: Tom Chitty, Ali Fitzgerald, and Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell.

To see all of the above and more link here.

______________________________

Book of Interest: Seth’s “Clyde Fans”

Out on bookstore shelves on April 30th from Drawn & Quarterly, Seth’s latest, Clyde Fans.  In the meantime, here’s a Publisher’s Weekly piece about it. Seth (Gregory Gallant) began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002.  Below, right, one of his covers.

Further recommended reading: Seth’s 1996 It’s A Good Life If You Don’t Weaken.

The PW article says about it: “Seth’s first graphic novel…seemed to be a memoir of the author’s attempts to track down a New Yorker cartoonist who had a brief flash of success in the ’40s—but the whole thing was fiction.” 

_________________________

Gerberg’s  New York Historical Society Exhibit Reviewed

From Women Write About Comics, March 29, 2019, ‘Main Thing Is, I Kept Drawing’: Mort Gerberg’s Cartoons On Display at The NYHS”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Peter Kuper; A Chapter Of Interest: Always On Wednesday

Today’s Daily cartoon, AG Barr-ish, is by Peter Kuper. Mr. Kuper began contributing to The New Yorker in June of 2011.  Visit his website here.

And check out his latest book!

__________________________

Chapter Of Interest: Always On Wednesday

In preparation for the upcoming MoCCA Fest panel, Mort Gerberg and Friends, celebrating Mr. Gerberg’s essential  On the Scene: A 50-Year Cartoon Chronicle  (Fantagraphics), I’ve been looking at a lot of Mr. Gerberg’s drawings, as well as his 1983 Cartooning: The Art and The Business.  Admittedly not one for process books (i.e., “how-to”) I was quite surprised to discover in the very first chapter of The Art and The Business  a wonderful first hand account by Mr. Gerberg of what it was like for cartoonists making the rounds of magazines in New York City back in the early 1960s. I’ve shown just the first page of Chapter One’s twenty-three pages (want to continue reading?  You can easily find the book online). This is probably the most extensive account I’ve read about the “look day” of long long ago (so long ago that it is no longer Always Wednesdays, at least at The New Yorker, where it’s been Always Tuesdays for several decades). Even though Mr. Gerberg references The Saturday Evening Post on the first page, any cartoonist who went in to the New Yorker for “look day” will recognize the sign-in sheet tradition.