The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 13, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

To my readers: This being the time we’re in, the online issue has not yet been posted (as of 11:00am), so what follows is a shortened version of The Monday Tilley Watch. Long-time visitors might recall I prefer first sightings of new cartoons in situ, but in order to provide at least some basic info, I’ve gone to the slideshow (it’s posted here — scroll way down).

The Cover: The last time we saw a Pascal Campion cover (Jan.6, 2020) the Spill pointed out its uncanny resemblance to an Arthur Getz cover from 1965. This week Mr. Campion speaks with The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, about Mr. Getz’s (and Sempe’s) influence on his work.

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Just as The New Yorker ran a good number of war cartoons during World War II (enough to fill an Album of war cartoons), we are beginning to see a number of corona virus-related cartoons during this particular war. In the latest issue, five of the eleven cartoons are tied-in to the virus, with another few possibly so.

Update after the digital edition was posted: a color strip by Ed Steed is also virus-related.

The Rea Irvin Masthead Talk Masthead Watch:

Without access to the digital edition, I can’t say for sure that Christoph Niemann’s Talk masthead redraw(!) still appears instead of Mr. Irvin’s iconic masthead.  If I had to guess, I’d say the real deal (just below) is still on a shelf, waiting to be dusted off.

Update after the digital edition was posted: the redraw remains…for now.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Jeremy Nguyen on what everyone’s doing again.

Mr. Nguyen began contributing to The New Yorker in

2017. Visit his website here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 10, 2020

The Cover: a photographer. Go here to read a short Q&A with the cover artist, Malika Favre. 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:  Random thoughts on just a few of the dozen drawings in the issue

Two New Yorker Cartoon Gods in this issue: Sam Gross and Edward Koren. Mr. Gross, who has the lead cartoon in the issue — and what a great drawing it is! — has been contributing since 1969.  Mr. Koren has been contributing his fab work, covers and drawings, since 1962.

…the issue’s second drawing — it’s by Emily Bernstein — features a fiery ball heading for Earth (a meteor? Guess it doesn’t matter exactly what it is. What it is for certain is trouble). It’s the second fiery ball about to crash into Earth drawing in the magazine within the past three issues (Jessica Olien had one in the issue of January 27th). Is the fiery ball about to hit Earth the new crash test dummy scenario?  These aren’t the first published by the magazine — my hope is they won’t be the last. Can’t wait to see what colleagues do with it (haven’t tried one yet myself, but the day is young).

…I really like Mike Twohy’s personal info drawing (p. 36). He employs a little used (anymore)  folksinger scenario. I’m always reminded, seeing a folksinger drawing, of the one below by the late, exceptionally great, Charles Saxon. I first saw it in The New Yorker Album Of Drawings 1925-1975  (I started my collection with that Album). The drawing originally appeared as a full page in The New Yorker issue of January 24, 1970.

…Jeremy Nguyen’s drawing (p. 38) deals with an issue  — table wobble — most of us have dealt with at one time or another. A fun intricate well-executed drawing…

…J.A.K.’s octopus on page 42 brought to mind an on-the-spot cartoon fact-checking moment I experienced in front of an auditorium filled with school children about a decade ago. I’d just drawn an octopus on a large pad of paper. The school principal, standing onstage with me, came over and, counting aloud — a teaching moment — made sure I’d drawn all eight arms (I had). Mr. Katzenstein has drawn all eight arms as well (yes, I counted).

The Rea Irvin Missing Talk Masthead Watch

Rea Irvin, The New Yorker‘s art supervisor who gave us the magazine’s inaugural cover featuring Eustace Tilley, designed the above masthead. It sat in place for 92 years before being replaced in 2017 by a re-draw (heavens!). Read about it here. The magazine’s 95th anniversary issue, out next week, would be the perfect occasion to return Mr. Irvin’s iconic design.

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of December 16, 2019; The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest, Now On Instagram Stories; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Look At Some Of The Cartoonists & Cartoons In The Latest Issue Of The New Yorker

The Cover: What looks suspiciously like a UPS deliveryman is carrying a fully decorated Christmas tree up the steps of a city brownstone. The deliveryman seems to have something in his mouth. A peach? A corn muffin? Or, possibly an ornament that fell off the tree? I was hoping the answer would be found here, in this short Q&A with Peter De Seves — the cover artist, but alas…

[Update on what’s in the deliveryman’s mouth: A friend of the Spill‘s has pointed out that there’s nothing in the deliveryman’s mouth. The way it appears on my laptop screen it appears there is, but upon very close inspection I can see that the thin line of the mouth forms what appears to be the top of a circle. The circular lines of the shaved-chin fill out a circle suggesting a ball-shape. The beard surrounding the ball-shape framed a circle.  Once I saw it, I couldn”t un-see it (even now).  I think too that the ball shape I’m seeing is nearly identical to the Christmas tree balls hanging close-by. The power of suggestion then, perhaps? Anywho, I stand corrected. My thanks to Attempted Bloggery]

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

…A healthy number of cartoons in The New Yorker’s almost last issue of the year.

…The duo of Pia Guerra and Ian Boothbay have contributed a very Charles Addams(y) drawing. It reminded me, structurally, of this Addams drawing from The New Yorker issue of April 28, 1980:

…The Mike Twohy drawing (on page 27) incorporates a semi-popular cartoonist go-to scenario: the large snake that’s swallowed something. A fairly recent example is this Jason Adam Katzenstein drawing for the issue of May 1, 2017. A sampling of others who’ve visited the big snake that’s swallowed something include Sam Gross, Farley Katz, and Ariel Molvig.

…Two other drawings that caught my eye: Peter Kuper’s couple in bed on page 47, and Joseph Dottini’s party scene on page 74.  As mentioned numerous times on the Monday Tilley Watch, it’s the unexpected drawing (ideally both caption and drawing) that keeps me hovering over a cartoon longer than usual.  Both these caused me to hover. A Spill round of applause for Mr. Kuper’s and Mr. Dottini’s work in this issue.

…A drawing by Ed Steed (it’s on on page 67) has caused me to resurrect a listing I started in 2008 on newyorker.com “Some Favorite Things.”   I wrote by way of introducing the list:

Everyone has favorites: flavors of ice cream, baseball teams, nieces and nephews. I have favorite cartoon elements. Like fingerprints, these elements are unique to a cartoonist’s work.

And then I went on to list a bunch of favorite elements. Here’s a sampling:

Bruce Eric Kaplan’s slanted rooms

P. C. Vey’s stiff-legged people

Jack Ziegler’s kids and dogs, and his men’s clothing

Sam Gross’ cats and mice

Well after seeing this latest drawing by Mr. Steed, I’d like to add:

 Ed Steed’s horses

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:  No news isn’t good news. Mr. Irvin’s beautiful masthead, (removed in the Spring of 2017 and replaced by a re-draw) is still gathering dust. For those who miss it, here it is:

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The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest, Now On Instagram Stories

The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen has announced a new cartoon caption contest feature. Read about it here. The feature begins with this week’s contest cartoon.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Avi Steinberg on the risk of making friends during the holidays. Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Stevenson Lost And Found Info; Future Addams Family; New Yorker Cartoonists Children’s Books Of Note: Paul Noth, Mike Twohy; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

More Stevenson Lost And Found Info

Here’s further information on the upcoming documentary, Stevenson Lost And Found. “Stevenson” is James Stevenson, one of The New Yorker‘s most prolific cartoonists.

From the Producers of Stevenson Lost And Found:

We are excited to announce the world premiere of Stevenson Lost And Found as part of the DOC NYC Film Festival 2019.

Tickets can be purchased here.

Screening Times:

Sun Nov 10, 2019, 5:25 PM / Cinepolis Chelsea

Mon Nov 11, 2019, 10:40 AM / IFC Center

Link here to the Stevenson Lost And Found website.

Link here to Stevenson Lost And Found on Instagram.

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Future Addams Family

The brand new Addams Family film is doing very very well at the box office …..which means there will be another.

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New Yorker Cartoonists Children’s Books of Note: Paul Noth, Mike Twohy

Out now is Paul Noth’s latest, How To Win The Science Fair When You’re Dead (Bloomsbury Children’s Books). Mr. Noth has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2004.

From the publisher: New Yorker cartoonist Paul Noth continues his laugh-out-loud, illustrated middle grade series about a boy, his wacky family, and an out-of-this-world adventure.

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Coming out in May of 2020 from Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books is Mike Twohy’s Spacebot. Mr. Twohy has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1980.

Here’s some text from Simon & Schuster:

Mike Twohy is a Geisel Honor Award–winning author and illustrator of several books for children, including Poindexter Makes a FriendOutfoxed about which The Horn Book said, “story time audiences will howl with laughter,” Wake Up, Rupert!, and Mouse and Hippo, which the School Library Journal called “a story time hit.”  He has been a longtime contributor of cartoons to The New Yorker. He lives with his wife, cats, and yellow Lab in Berkeley, California.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The “perfect” Dear Santa letter…by Joe Dator, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2006.  Visit his website here.

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill; A Smaller Daily Shouts; A Playboy Cartoon; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of July 29 – August 3, 2019

 

A Smaller Daily Shouts: “Course Of Empire: Part 5” — Ms. Smaller has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1996. Further reading from The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank blog and from Jane Mattimoe’s A Case For Pencils.

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A Playboy Cartoon

Not too very long ago — fifteen years? — if you asked a cartoonist to name the top two places to take one’s work, the answer would be The New Yorker, and then Playboy. In recent times, what with the roller-coastering of cartoon-usage at Playboy, the idea of a second best place is anyone’s call. “Will the Millenials Save Playboy?”  from today’s New York Times mentions there is a cartoon in the Summer issue of Playboy. Is there more than one?

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An end of week gathering of New Yorker cartoonist contributors to the Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Barry Blitt (two Bonus Daily cartoons), Mike Twohy, Ali Solomon, Ward Sutton, Lila Ash, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, and Brendan Loper.

Daily Shouts: Evan Lian, and Ali Fitzgerald.