Photo of Interest: Peter Arno Singing & Playing Piano; More From the Buchanan Files via Mike Lynch

Peter Arno Singing & Playing Piano

Was very pleased  to see one of Stanley Kubrick’s Arno photos make it into The New York Times review of the Kubrick photo exhibit. The reviewer, Arthur Lubow, had this to say about the photo:

A striking shot at the piano of Peter Arno, the New Yorker cartoonist and bon vivant, with eyes shut and mouth open, an ashtray holding down the sheet music, is composed with masterly precision.

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More From the Buchanan Files via Lynch

Dick Buchanan has reached into his extensive clip file for a fun bunch of cartoons from the 1930s. Most of these folks were published in The New Yorker, including Dorothy McKay whose drawing  below appeared in Life magazine.  See the rest here on Mike Lynch’s blog, posted May 3, 2018.

The other New Yorker cartoonists in the post: Gardner Rea, Gluyas Williams, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Charles Addams, Chon Day, Richard Decker, Ned Hilton, George Shellhase, Leonard Dove, Syd Hoff, Otto Soglow, and William Steig.

Below is Ms. McKay’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:


Dorothy McKay ( Self portrait above from Meet the Artist, 1943; Photo from Cartoon Humor, 1938) Born c.1904, died June, 1974 New York City. New Yorker work: 1934 -1936.

 

Cartoonist Mike Lynch on Dwindling Cartoon Markets; Mischa Richter on Attempted Bloggery; A New Yorker State of Mind Looks At The April 20, 1929 New Yorker

From Mike Lynch, May 2, 2018, “Another Market For Gag Cartoons is Going Going Gone”

Reader’s Digest is in the headlights here.

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 Attempted Bloggery on Mischa Richter

Following up his E. Simms Campbell fest, Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery moves on to Mischa Richter. Looking forward to what he has come up with. See today’s Richter post here.

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A New Yorker State of Mind Looks At The April 20, 1929 New Yorker

A New Yorker State of Mind forges ahead with another in-depth look at an issue from ages ago.  Above: The issue, with an Arthur Kronengold cover — one of 22 of his published by the magazine. Here’s the post! 

 

 

Kickstarter of Interest: Maine Cartoonists; Cartoon Companion Rates the New New Yorker Cartoons

Kickstarter of Interest: Maine Cartoonists

Here’s a short Kickstarter video for Lobster Therapy & Moose Pickup Lines by Maine cartoonists Bill Woodman, John Klossner, and David Jacobson (and one very-close-to-the Maine-border-cartoonist, Mike Lynch).

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Cartoon Companion Rates the New New Yorker Cartoons

“Max” & “Simon” focus on all the cartoons in the latest issue of The New Yorker — the issue with the Hockney on the cover. Read it all here.

Dick Buchanan’s 40s Faves: Barbara Shermund, Chon Day, Addams, C.E.M, Barlow, Richard Taylor, and More; Publishers Weekly on the Growing Popularity of MoCCA’s Fest

Dick Buchanan’s 40s Faves

Mike Lynch has been posting selected materials from the Dick Buchanan Files for quite some time.  In today’s post Mr. Buchanan offers up favorites from the 1940s. All of the cartoonists in this post would’ve been familiar to New Yorker readers (and some still are). See them here.

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Publishers Weekly on MoCCA’s Popularity

From PW, April 11, 2018, “Exhibitors, Fans Keep Growing at MoCCA Fest 2018”

 

Interview of Interest: Chon Day

Courtesy of Mike Lynch’s blog, we are able to read what is surely an obscure interview with Chon Day that appeared in a publication from the early 1960s, Pro Cartoonist & Gagwriter

Here’s Mr. Day’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Chon Day (self portrait above from Collier’s Collects Its Wits) Born April 6, 1907, Chatham , NJ. Died January 1, 2000, Rhode Island. New Yorker work: 1931 – 1998. Collection: I Could Be Dreaming (Robert M. McBride & Co., 1945). Brother Sebastian (Hanover House, 1957). 

Go here to Mr. Lynch’s blog to see the interview & more.  Mr. Day’s interview appears in two parts.