Book Tour Of Interest: Liana Finck; Dick Buchanan On The Roth Brothers: Al Ross, Irving Roir, Ben Roth, And Salo; Daily Cartoonists: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Avi Steinberg; A Daily Shouts By…Ward Sutton

Book Tour Of Interest: Liana Finck

Liana Finck’s latest book, Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, And Notes To Self  is out September 24th (Random House). Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013.  Link here to her website.

________________________________________________________

Dick Buchanan On The Roth Brothers: Al Ross, Irving Roir, Ben Roth, and Salo

Here’s a terrif post by Dick Buchanan on the Roth brothers (via Mike Lynch’s blog).

__________________________________________________________________

Daily Cartoonists: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Avi Steinberg  

The Daily News Cycle  by Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

A back to school Daily by Avi Steinberg, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

________________________________________________________

A Daily Shouts By…Ward Sutton

“The World’s Greatest Dealmaker” by Ward Sutton, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. Visit his website here.

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Early George Price Via Mike Lynch; Warp’s Daily Shouts

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A comment on the President, from Tim Hamilton, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

Note: As last week’s New Yorker was a double issue, there’s no Monday Tilley Watch today. The Watch will return next Monday for the August 19th issue.

_______________________________________________________________________

Early George Price Via Mike Lynch

The cartoonist Mike Lynch gives us a nice selection of George Price’s work from the 1940 Price collection, Good Humor Man.  Here’s Price’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Price  Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991. Lee Lorenz, the New Yorker’s former Art/Cartoon editor, called Price one of the magazine’s great stylists (along with Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, James Thurber, and William Steig. Of the many Price collections here are two favorites:  Browse At Your Own Risk (1977), and The World of George Price: A 55-Year Retrospective (1988)

_________________________________________________________________

Warp’s Daily Shouts

Today’s Daily Shouts, courtesy of Kim Warp: “Possible Explanations For Exhuming John Dillinger”

Ms. Warp has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1999. Visit her website here.

 

A Virgil Partch Bonanza Via Dick Buchanan; The New Yorker:”A World Without MAD Magazine”; A Daily Bonus And Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Virgil Partch Bonanza

Dick Buchanan has dug into his voluminous files for a whole lot of Virgil Partch. Mr. Partch’s cartoons  (he signed his work “VIP”) appeared in The New Yorker just a half dozen times, but could be found in many of the major (and some of the minor) magazines of his day . Mr. Buchanan gives us a wonderful four-part survey via Mike Lynch’s blog.

Above: From Liberty March 4, 1944, courtesy of Mr. Buchanan’s files

Below, his Spill A-Z entry

Virgil Partch (VIP)  Born, St. Paul Island, Alaska, 1917; died in a car crash on Interstate 5, north of Los Angeles. California, August 1984. New Yorker work: six drawings, beginning in November 21, 1942. His last appeared May 3, 1976.

 

_________________________________________________________

The New Yorker: “A World Without MAD Magazine”

 

The New Yorker has weighed in on the demise of MAD.  Read Jordan Orlando’s Culture Desk piece, “A World Without MAD Magazine” here.

Pictured: The Spill‘s all-too-slim collection of MADs, running from 1960 – 1981.

 

 

_________________________________________________________________________________

A Bonus Daily from Barry Blitt…And Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Mr. Mueller at home. Barry Blitt began contributing to The New Yorker in 1993. Visit his website here.

And today’s Daily: More Mueller from David Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Elisabeth McNair; Surreal McCoy’s “Wolf Of Baghdad”At Shrewsbury Int’l Cartoon Festival; Today’s Daily Shouts By…Julia Wertz; Cooper Hewitt’s Steinberg’s Spot The Difference; Dick Buchanan’s Perry Barlow File

Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Kids, parents, computers…by Elisabeth McNair.  Ms. McNair began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.  Visit her website here.

____________________________

Surreal McCoy’s “Wolf Of Baghdad” At Shrewsbury Int’l Cartoon Festival

All the info here on the film and the festival.

Ms. McCoy (Carol Isaacs) began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.  Visit her website here.

_____________________

Today’s Daily Shouts by…Julia Wertz

“Conversations with Ma: Making Wreaths and Having Kids” by Julia Wertz. Ms. Wertz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.   Visit her website here.

__________________________

Cooper Hewitt’s Steinberg Spot the Difference

Something fun.  From Cooper Hewitt, April 24, 2019, “Spot the Difference: Steinberg Edition”

Here’s Steinberg’s Spill A-Z entry:

Saul Steinberg Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

____________________

Dick Buchanan’s Perry Barlow File

Another great post from Dick Buchanan via Mike Lynch’s blog.  This time it’s “Perry Barlow 1932- 1961”

(Above: a Barlow from Collier’s, January 21, 1955).

From Mr. Barlow’s Spill A-Z entry:

Perry Barlow ( photo above from barlowgeneology.com) Born 1892, McKinney, Texas. Died, Westport, Connecticut, December 26,1977. New Yorker work: 1926 -1974, with 1,574 drawings and 135 covers. According to Barlow’s obit in The New York Times (Dec. 27, 1977) William Shawn called him “one of the gentlest and most humane of all comic artists…he was also one of our three or four most prolific people.” In the same piece, James Geraghty (The New Yorker’s Art editor from 1939 thru 1973) said “he often tried to interest Mr. Barlow in publishing a book of his drawings ‘but he was halfhearted about it.’” Mr. Barlow’s wife, Dorothy Hope Smith, played a role in his work: she colored-in his covers because her husband was partly color blind.