From The Archive: A Ross Perot New Yorker Cartoon; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoon & Cartoonist; The Village Voice & MAD

I haven’t done a whole lot of (obviously) political cartoons over the years. A Supreme Court drawing in the very early 1980s and a Bill Clinton drawing in the early 1990s come readily to mind.  Ross Perot, the two-time Presidential candidate who died today at age 89, was a humor magnet. Like so many other of the magazine’s cartoonists ( including Lee Lorenz, Liza Donnelly, James Stevenson, Peter Steiner, Arnie Levin, Mick Stevens, Dana Fradon, J.B. Handelsman, and Jack Ziegler) I couldn’t resist having a graphic go at him. The below appeared in The New Yorker issue of May 27, 1996.

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Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Beach reading by Ellis Rosen, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.  Visit his

website here.

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The Village Voice & Mad

 

From The Village Voice, July 9, 2019, “MAD Magazine: Eclipsed By Madness? Looking Back On The Publication That Endowed America With a B. S. Detector”  — this piece by Jeoffrey O’Brien on MAD in The Voice over the years.

Two Peacocks Walk Into A Room; Rare Book Of Interest: A John M. Price Cartoon Anthology: Sara Lautman’s Daily Shouts; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Avi Steinberg

In one of those million-to-one cartoon moments, both my colleague Harry Bliss (with his collaborator Steve Martin) and I have similar drawings out this week (his in his syndicated daily spot, and mine in The New Yorker). What’s unusual, besides the timing of publication, and the peacock standing in a doorway in both drawings, is the use of the peacock itself. A quick visit to the New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site turned up peacock drawings by a dozen artists. I have to think there were a number more in the magazine’s ninety-four years (the Cartoon Bank site does not provide every cartoon in the magazine’s archive). The listed peacock drawings are by: Mick Stevens, Sam Gross, Will McPhail, John O’Brien, George Booth, Bernard Schoenbaum, George Price, Edward Koren, Saul Steinberg (he has three), Robert Day, Mort Gerberg, and Victoria Roberts. There were also three peacock covers shown. The artists:  Joseph Low (the peacock is a minor character in his cover), Steinberg, and the one-and-only Rea Irvin. 

I asked Mr. Bliss if he’d like to comment on our dual peacock drawings, and here’s what he had to say:

That’s crazy! I didn’t get my new issue of The New Yorker yet, so I didn’t even know that was in there.  When I initially did my drawing, from an idea given to me by Steve Martin, I think I mentioned to Emma [Emma Allen, The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor] that I wanted it to be in color. Seeing yours now, makes me wonder if they bought yours before they had seen mine and the reason they didn’t buy mine and Steve’s is because they had already bought yours… Similars? Anyway, I think the reason there aren’t that many peacock cartoons out there is because the damn thing is so hard to draw!

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Rare Book Of Interest: A John M. Price Anthology

Warren Bernard (of SPX fame) has alerted the Spill to another rarity: a cartoon collection of work by John M. Price who contributed four drawings to the magazine (Mr. Bernard tells me that three of Mr. Price’s four New Yorker drawings appear in the collection). Here’s Price’s rather skimpy bio on the A-Z (if anyone out there has more info please send this way):

John M. Price Born  (Pennsylvania?) February 5, 1918, died January 19, 2009, Radnor, Pennsylvania. New Yorker work: February 17, 1940, March 9, 1940, June 8, 1941, and August 30, 1941. His work appeared in many publications, including The Saturday Evening Post, Esquire, The Country Gentleman, and Colliers. Key collection (self published) Don’t Get Polite with Me.

*Chris Wheeler’s fabulous site also has a scan of Price’s book (including the back cover), but I have to admit the cover never registered in my brain’s cartoon catalog. Now, having registered it, the book becomes a must-have for the Spill‘s library.  

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A Daily Shouts By…

Sara Lautman, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016, contributed yesterday’s Daily Shouts.

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

 

An Avi Steinberg summer vacation/global warming cartoon. Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.  More about him here on Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils.

 

 

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 4, 2019

The Cover: Vegetation abounds. Here’s what the artist,Tom Gauld had to say about it.

The Cartoonists in the new issue:


The Magazine: Whenever February comes around, I begin thinking about the upcoming anniversary issue of The New Yorker, a favorite child here on this site (Spill visitors might remember this Tilley-centric piece I wrote for newyorker.com a few years back). Seeing Rea Irvin’s classic dandy this year would be such a welcome surprise. Even more of a surprise than, say, coming upon the now-famous Mandy the Mandarin duck in Central Park. It’s been awhile since we’ve seen Irvin’s iconic cover. In fact, the last time was in 2011. So what will next week’s cover be: the dandy or a duck?



Beginning To Take It Personally: The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975- 1985

The other day I wrote about the New Yorker Anniversary album: 1925-1975.  Following up on that, here’s a little something about the Album that immediately followed it, The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975- 1985.  In the entire run of Albums, this one would have to rank #1 in understated covers. A bit of trivia (or maybe it’s not so trivial): this is just the second time an Album title referred to the magazine’s drawings as “cartoons” —  (the first was 1958’s New Yorker Album of Sports & Games: Cartoons of Three Decades. Non-purists might argue that the special issue Armed Services New Yorker War Cartoons with The Talk of the Town, published in 1945 was the first instance, but it was not an Album, nor was it, as you see in the title, purely cartoons).

Of note: 1975-1985 is the first Album since the early 1930s not designed by Carmine Peppe.  The design and layout is credited to a trio of New Yorker staffers: John Murphy, Bernard McAteer, and Joseph Carroll (who succeeded Mr. Peppe as head of the make-up department. Mr. Carroll was also a published New Yorker cartoonist, with one drawing, in the issue of January 16, 1984. That one and only appearance qualified him as a member of the Spill‘s One Club).

Of further note: this was the last Album published during William Shawn’s long tenure as editor of the New Yorker. It was published the year The New Yorker‘s ownership changed hands from the original owners, the Fleischmann family, to the Newhouse family. Mr. Shawn, who was appointed editor in 1952, was replaced in 1987 by Robert Gottlieb.

 

Admittedly, I have affection for this Album out of some self-interest: it was the first that included my work.  But it also included, for the first time in an Album, work by the wave I came in with — that included, among others, cartoonists such as Mick Stevens, Thomas Cheney, Peter Steiner, Richard Cline, Leo Cullum, Roz Chast, and Liza Donnelly. 

Truly exciting were the number of established cartoonists we kids found ourselves in the company of. To be included in this volume (and later Albums) with them was, and still is somewhat unbelievable. 

As with previous Albums, the cartoon choices are excellent.  The Album begins with an exquisite Robert Weber full page drawing (full page in the Album, and run as a full page in the magazine in the issue of July 2, 1984)…

…and ends with a classic Charles Addams drawing (a fellow is installing yet another of many locks — and bolts — on his door. At his feet is a semi-circle made by an active saw blade coming up through the floor). In between these two cartoon gems is an accurate reflection of the state of the magazine’s cartoon world in that decade.  As with previous Albums, the balance of work placement and selection is superior. There’s enough work by Booth, Steinberg, Koren, Saxon, Steig, George Price, Addams, Stevenson, Levin, Modell, Lorenz, both Martins (Henry, and Charles) to please anybody, but also well-represented are the large number of artists who flourished just out of range of the spotlight. 

Along with the publication of the Album was a touring exhibit of work.  I wrote about this Album and that exhibit a year ago, but in a slightly different context. You can see that earlier post here

 There was no official album a decade later (instead we were gifted Lee Lorenz’s Art of The New Yorker), and ten years after that was the The New Yorker 75th Cartoon Collection, which bears a cover opposite the understated cover of the 1975-1985 album.   

The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of November 26-30, 2018; More Spills!

New Yorker cartoonists that contributed to the Daily Cartoon this week: Brendan Loper, Sophia Warren, and Pat Byrnes. (No worries, you’re sure to see some Trump-related cartoons in the bunch). 

And the New Yorker cartoonists contributing to Daily Shouts: Liana Finck, Mick Stevens, and Olivia de Recat.

To see all the work above, and more, link here.

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…The Amazon price is plummeting for the recently published New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons (originally offered at $100.00). The big red trope box can now be yours for a mere $40.38.  Just four days ago it was $45.83. I smell a bargain.

…Even more Edward Koren.  This short piece on Mr. Koren  has been picked up by the AP and is showing up all over the place today. Below: Mr. Koren’s latest collection.