The Weekend Spill: Donnelly & Thurber’s Influence; A Thurber Event At The Society Of Illustrators; The Tilley Watch Online; Interview Of Interest: Seth; Chris Ware In Conversation With Chip Kidd

Donnelly & Thurber’s Influence

From The Cleveland Plain Dealer (cleveland.com), September 1, 2019, “James Thurber continues to influence today’s cartoonists”  — this piece by Marilyn Greenwald

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A Thurber Anniversary Event At The Society Of Illustrators

From The Society Of Illustrators, this notice of a Thurber event this coming October. Coinciding with the 125th birthday celebration publication of Collected Fables and A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber and the extensive exhibit of Thurber art in his hometown of Columbus, Ohio.

The evening, hosted by Michael Rosen (author, editor, illustrator, and  founding director of The Thurber House) will include long-time New Yorker contributors, Danny Shanahan, Liza Donnelly, and yours truly.

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A week end round up of New Yorker artists who’ve contributed to the Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Trevor Spaulding, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Emily Flake, David Sipress, and Tim Hamilton.

Daily Shouts: Liana Finck (another in her “Dear Pepper” series), Ali Fitzgerald, Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman),

…And: Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook returned; cover artist Jenny Kroik contributed a piece, “New York: En Espanol” to The Culture Desk.

You can see all of the above and more here.

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Interview Of Interest: Seth

From The Comics Beat, August 30, 2019, Alex Dueben interviews New Yorker cover artist, Seth.  Read it here.

Seth (real name: Gregory Gallant) began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002.

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Chris Ware In Conversation With Chip Kidd, Sept. 25th

Designer Chip Kidd sits down with Chis Ware on September 25th in Oak Park, Illinois to discuss Mr. Ware’s soon-to-be-released graphic novel, Rusty Brown (Pantheon) . All the details here.

Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

 

Audio Of Interest: About Thurber’s 125th Anniversary Exhibit, Books; A Bonus Daily Cartoon; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Audio Of Interest: About Thurber’s 125th Anniversary Exhibit, Books

Michael Rosen (shown above), the fellow key to the festivities surrounding the 125th anniversary of Thurber’s birth, talks to Thurber’s hometown newspaper’s “Newsroom” about the events tied-in to the anniversary. Hear it here.

And here’s a calendar of Thurber events

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A Bonus Daily Cartoon & Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

See Barry Blitt’s Bonus Daily here. Mr. Blitt has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1992.  A link to his website

Today’s Daily cartoon, politicians and food at the Iowa State Fair, is by Tim Hamilton, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

Rewind Wednesday: Thurber On The Cover Of Newsweek

           Newsweek’s Thurber Cover Story

In July of 1951, TIME  put Thurber on its cover — it’s the cover most Thurber biographies mention.  Newsweek’s Thurber cover, out six years later, is rarely mentioned. Thinking about it this morning,  I dug out the sole bound volume of Newsweek in the Spill‘s library (acquired, obviously, because it contains the Thurber issue) and took another look at this lost feature.

The piece was an old-fashioned tie-in with his new book The Wonderful ‘O’ . Like all profiles it’s a mini-biography. If you’re familiar with the broad strokes of Thurber’s story, there isn’t much new here —  it’s simply a fun refresher course. There is however this Thurber gem tossed in: 

“I have never understood how Americans got the reputation for having a sense of humor. Actually we are a nation of slapstick people. We invented  the gag, the belly-laugh, and the hotfoot. We are not a nation who chuckles…”

Along with the now familiar late-in-life photo of Thurber drawing while wearing a Zeiss loupe (he was close to completely blind — the magnifying device allowed him to continue drawing) and a photo of him with his second wife, Helen, and their dog, there are plenty of Thurber drawings, many of them playfully bordering the text.  It’s a lovely intro to a New Yorker  giant.  

If this puts you in the mood for more Thurber, be sure to check out Michael Rosen’s A Mile and a Half of Lines: The Art of James Thurber (Trillium/Ohio State University Press, 2019), a wonderful addition to your library. It’s out August 23rd.  [Full disclosure: my wife, Liza Donnelly, and I contributed to the book]

 

 

Book On The Horizon…”A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber”; Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly; Audio Of Interest: Roz Chast; Audio Of Interest: Bob Eckstein: Chris Ware In School; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Farley Katz

Coming this July from Ohio State University Press,  A Mile And A Half of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber.

Edited by Michael Rosen, with contributions from Rosemary Thurber, Liza Donnelly, Seymour Chwast, Ian Frazier, and yours truly.

From the publisher:

Humorist, cartoonist, writer, playwright. James Thurber was to the twentieth century what Mark Twain was to the nineteenth. At one point, his books were the most read of any American in the world. His work could be found anywhere—from the pages of the New Yorker to the pages of children’s books, from illustrated advertisements to tea towels and dresses. Now, in celebration of the 125th anniversary of Thurber’s birth, A Mile and a Half of Lines: The Art of James Thurber is a long overdue introduction and reintroduction to James Thurber and the artwork that fundamentally changed American cartoons. Including some 260 drawings, this collection is the first comprehensive focus on his work as an artist, a cartoonist, and an illustrator.

Coinciding with the first major retrospective of Thurber’s art presented by the Columbus Museum of Art in 2019, A Mile and a Half of Lines showcases both classic Thurber as well as visual material never before seen in print.

 

Here’s James Thurber’s entry on Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

James Thurber Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

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Video of Interest: Liza Donnelly

Liza Donnelly was just out in Silicon Valley live-drawing at the Global Women In Data Science Conference. A short video here about her work

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.  Here’s her website.

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Radio Interview of Interest: Bob Eckstein

A lot of fun snowman talk in this half -hour radio interview with Mr. Eckstein, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007. (scroll down to February 13, 2019).

Mr. Eckstein is also the editor of this upcoming cartoon anthology:

Link here to Bob Eckstein’s website.

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Radio Interview of Interest: Roz Chast

From WBAI (NYC), March 6, 2019, this hour-long interview with Roz Chast.

Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978.  Here’s her website.

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Chris Ware In School

From Skidmore College, March 6, 2019, “Cartoonist Chris Ware Talks Art careers”  — Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.  

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

 Facebook is the subject of today’s Daily, courtesy of cartoonist Farley Katz.  Mr. Katz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.  Here’s his website.