The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 29, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon; A Julia Wertz Daily Shouts; Fave Photo Of The Day

The Cover:  I see destructive tourists at the core of this cover, yet destruction doesn’t come up in Joost Swarte’s interview with The New Yorker‘s art director, Francoise Mouly.  Odd?

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Almost a theme issue, of sorts:  Amy Hwang (cats), Roz Chast (dogs), Farley Katz (flamingos), Joe Duffy (pigs), Kendra Allenby (deer), Frank Cotham (a snake), Shannon Wheeler (snails), Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell (a rat).

Steering briefly away from the Spill‘s focus, I have to note that Salman Rushdie’s piece in the issue  is titled “The Little King” and the accompanying illustration (by Nico Schweitzer) is a play on Otto Soglow‘s famous character. The illustration seems even closer to the toy Little King than the drawing of the King :

 

 

Applause for Bob Eckstein‘s shuttlecock drawing on page 48, and Ellis Rosen‘s heralded fellow drawing on page 42.

 

From the Department of fun coincidences. Liana Finck’s lifeguard drawing (p. 33) immediately reminded me of an obscure original Lee Lorenz drawing hanging here at Spill headquarters. The Lorenz drawing (its barely legible caption: “Help!”) was not in The New Yorker.  I’ve yet to figure out where it was published, or how old it is.  Mr. Lorenz, visiting here and seeing the drawing, could not recall where it had appeared or its vintage. It appears to be in an earlier Lorenz style (but not the earliest), so we can at least place in an early-to-mid 1960s time frame.

Ms. Finck’s drawing and Mr. Lorenz’s are in some ways opposites of each other. Mr. Lorenz’s beach is overcrowded, while Ms. Finck’s beach is empty.  Ms. Finck’s life guard offers help (if helped); Mr. Lorenz’s life guard is crying out for help. What ties them together, at least for me, is the graphic core of each drawing: the exceptionally tall life guard stand. Fine fun work by both. 

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead (below) left us in the Spring of 2017 after 92 years of service — it was replaced by a redraw.  Let’s hope the real thing returns before long.  Read about it here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon

Brendan Loper makes good use of oven mitts. Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

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A Julia Wertz Daily Shouts

“Conversations With Ma: Paint The Toenails And Board-Game Gripes” 

— A series? by Julia Wertz who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

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Fave Photo Of The Day

A crowd of folks who draw got together yesterday in Rhinebeck, New York.  Left to right: myself, Peter Steiner, John Cuneo, R.O. Blechman, Liza Donnelly, Bill Plympton, Danny Shanahan and Elwood Smith.

 

 

 

From The Archive: A Ross Perot New Yorker Cartoon; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoon & Cartoonist; The Village Voice & MAD

I haven’t done a whole lot of (obviously) political cartoons over the years. A Supreme Court drawing in the very early 1980s and a Bill Clinton drawing in the early 1990s come readily to mind.  Ross Perot, the two-time Presidential candidate who died today at age 89, was a humor magnet. Like so many other of the magazine’s cartoonists ( including Lee Lorenz, Liza Donnelly, James Stevenson, Peter Steiner, Arnie Levin, Mick Stevens, Dana Fradon, J.B. Handelsman, and Jack Ziegler) I couldn’t resist having a graphic go at him. The below appeared in The New Yorker issue of May 27, 1996.

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Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Beach reading by Ellis Rosen, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.  Visit his

website here.

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The Village Voice & Mad

 

From The Village Voice, July 9, 2019, “MAD Magazine: Eclipsed By Madness? Looking Back On The Publication That Endowed America With a B. S. Detector”  — this piece by Jeoffrey O’Brien on MAD in The Voice over the years.

Personal History: Mother’s Day

 

My mother once told me that Mother’s Day was more important to her than her own birthday.  Thinking of her today, I can’t help but think of the world she grew up in, especially during her formative years from the 1920s through 1950s. Hers was not the world of the arts, but of a factory job right after high school, and later, jobs taken to put food on the table for her three kids (my father was basically a no-show). She worked a luncheonette counter, and at a doughnut shop.  She worked in an ancient dark red brick factory near our home, where she assembled electrical parts whizzing by on an assembly line.  She joined the local police force as a crossing guard, wearing a dark blue uniform and a badge.

At home, at the end of her work day, she’d return to her three young boys and her husband-less home. I spent those after-school early evening hours laying on our living room floor drawing; she left me alone in my little paper and pencil world, never commenting on what I was working on.  But one day, when I was about seven years old, she broke her silence. It’s very possible she was worried;  perhaps she wondered where all this drawing was going — how would I make a living drawing soldiers and cowboys and angry dragons; and why wasn’t I down at the park playing with all the other kids, or doing homework?

And so, on that late afternoon, she spoke up.  “If someone asked you to draw a guy about to slip on a banana peel, you could do that, right?”  I answered, “Yes” (thankfully I didn’t tell her that I hated the thought of someone telling me what to draw).  All these many many years (and many many drawings) later, I continue to appreciate and value her beautiful parental mix of support and real world concern: “…you could do that, right?” 

 

Auction Of Interest: Press Forward Auction Includes Cartoonists Galore!

News of an auction of cartoon art (both original work and prints) to support Press Forward. According to their website PF is an independent initiative whose mission is to change culture in newsrooms.

Also to be auctioned are a number of fun experiences including this:

 Behind the Scenes Experience with New Yorker Editor David Remnick and Cartoon Editor, Emma Allen

Some of the work up for auction is already online, and can be seen here. More art will be available online prior to the live auction/party in Washington, D.C., May 8th.  The Spill will update as art is added online.

Here’s the invite to the event. Link here to RSVP.

Below:  a list of the artists whose work is up for grabs:

 

New Yorker cartoonists:

Kim Warp

Amy Hwang

Liza Donnelly

Michael Maslin

Emily Flake

Peter Kuper

Christopher Weyant  

 

New Yorker cover artists:

Barry Blitt  

John Cuneo  

 

Pulitzer Prize winner Editorial Cartoonists:

Signe Wilkinson  (the first woman to win Pulitzer) (Philadelphia Daily News)

Ann Telnaes  (The Washington Post)

Jim Morin (independent)

Matt Wuerker (Politico)

Joel Pett (The Lexington Herald-Leader)

 

Editorial Cartoonists:

Ed Hall (independent)

Rob Rogers (independent)

Jen Sorenson  (Daily Kos)

Chip Bok (Akron Beacon Journal)

Keith Knight (syndicated)

Tom Toles  (The Washington Post)

Pat Bagley (The Salt Lake Tribune)

Jake Tapper (CNN / State of the Cartoonian)

Jeff Danziger (independent)

Sage Stossel (The Atlantic)

Lisa Benson  (independent)