The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 6, 2020; A Spill Cartoonist List: Fun At First Sight

The Cover Artist: Kadir Nelson returns just two weeks after his stunning cover of June 22nd.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A double issue with eighteen cartoons by eighteen cartoonists (with two duo efforts: Bliss & Martin, Guerra & Boothby). There’s also a Sketchpad drawing from J.A.K., and a newbie in the midst: Patrick McKelvie. Mr. McKelvie is the tenth new cartoonist to join The New Yorker’s stable this year and the sixty-third brought in by cartoon editor Emma Allen since she was appointed in the Spring of 2017.

Here are some of the cartoons in this week’s issue that caught my eye: a classic  lighthouse light bulb drawing by great Sam Gross, and then perhaps my favorite Ellis Rosen drawing ever (so far!) — his cave people drawing (much like Mr. Gross’s lighthouse drawing) proves that there is plenty of humor to unearth in these favorite cartoon scenarios. Liana Finck’s tent basement is terrif, as is Amy Hwang’s great ice cream on the beach scene. Enjoyed Roz Chast’s six-squares (the way she uses language here reminds me of Bizarro Superman).  Lars Kenseth’s superhero is so much fun. Repeating myself here, but Mr. Kenseth’s drawings never fail to amuse me upon first sighting — I’m sold before I get to the caption.

Fun At First Sight:

Thinking of that kind of reaction has caused me to think about (and mention) some other New Yorker cartoonists whose styles alone have won me over at first glance. I’m going to list only those who’ve passed into the great beyond so as not to offend anyone still around who I might inadvertently forget to mention.

Each of the following had a “theirs alone” style unlike any other being published in the magazine. That’s a wonderful thing, and difficult to do in a crowded cartoonist universe; each brought something else to the drawing paper as well — sometimes easily defined (see Dean Vietor’s work, for example: I’ve mentioned his thrilling wild energetic drawings before on the Spill), and sometimes not.

So here, in alphabetical order are some (not all!) of those fun at first sight New Yorker artists …Addams, Arno (Peter & Ed), Charles Barsotti, Whitney Darrow, Chon Day, Alan Dunn, Dana Fradon, Helen Hokinson, Nurit Karlin, Anatol Kovarsky, Robert Kraus, Frank Modell, Mary Petty, Price (George & Garrett), Gardner Rea, Donald Reilly, Carl Rose, Al Ross, Charles Saxon, Bernie Schoenbaum, Barbara Shermund, Otto Soglow, Steig, Steinberg, James Stevenson, Richard Taylor, Thurber, Dean Vietor, Robert Weber, Gluyas Williams, Gahan Wilson, and Jack Ziegler.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Would love to report that Rea Irvin’s iconic design had returned (it’s been collecting dust since it was replaced by a redraw(!) in the Spring of 2017). But such is not the case. Bah, humbug.

Read about it here.

Here’s what we’re missing:

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Time Capsule: The New Yorker Issue Of March 21, 1931 Via A New Yorker State Of Mind

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Mort Gerberg  on Zoom(ing) this day.  In just two days Mr. Gerberg will celebrate the 55th anniversary of his first published New Yorker cartoon, shown below.

Visit his website here.

Mort Gerberg’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Mort Gerberg  Born, March 11, 1931, New York, NY. New Yorker work: April 10, 1965 – . Co-edited, with Ron Wolin & Ed Fisher, The Art in Cartooning: Seventy-five Years of American Magazine Cartoons ( Charles Scribner & Son, 1975). Essential reading… Mort Gerberg On The Scene: A 50-Year Cartoon Chronicle (Fantagraphics, 2019).

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Time Capsule: The New Yorker Issue Of March 21, 1931 Via A New Yorker State Of Mind

A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker Magazine   dives deep into the issue of March 21, 1931. Some of the names you’ll run across: Dorothy Parker, E.B. White, FDR, Charles Lindbergh. And cartoons by, among others, Otto Soglow, Mary Petty (and her husband, Alan Dunn), Barbara Shermund, and Helen Hokinson (the cover artist for the issue as well).

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Peter Kuper’s NYT’s Book Review Back Page; The Tilley Watch Online, October 28 – November 1, 2019; Karasik Speaks; A Mary Petty Exhibit In Maryland

Peter Kuper’s New York Times Book Review  “Graphic Review”

Be sure to check out Peter Kuper’s “Graphic Review” (featured in tomorrow’s New York Times Book Review). His new book, Heart Of Darkness is out November 5th. He’ll be appearing to sign and speak about the book twice in New York next week (see yesterday’s Spill for links to venues).

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The Tilley Watch Online, October 28 – November 1, 2019: an end of the week listing of New Yorker artists that contributed online to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Ali Solomon, Karen Sneider, Johnny DiNapoli, Barbara Smaller, Kim Warp, Ellis Rosen.

Daily Shouts: Sara Lautman, Ellis Rosen & Colin Stokes, Ali Fitzgerald.

and…the stand alone feature,  Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

Go here to see all of the above and more (including Lynda Barry’s Daily Shouts piece, “Making Comics: The Face-Jam Excercise”), 

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Karasik Speaks

See the poster for all the info, and/or go here. Mr. Karasik began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

His most recent book, co-authored with Mark Newgarden, was How to Read Nancy: The Elements Of Comics In Three Easy Panels, published by Fantagraphics  in 2017.

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A Mary Petty Exhibit In Maryland

A Mary Petty exhibit is about to open at St. John’s Mitchell Gallery.  All the info here.

Ms. Petty’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Mary Petty Born, Hampton, New Jersey, April 29, 1899. Died, Paramus, New Jersey, March, 1976. New Yorker work: October 22, 1927 – March 19, 1966. Collection: This Petty Place ( Knopf, 1945) with a Preface by James Thurber.

 

 

Some Favorite Summertime New Yorker Covers

This hot and humid long 4th of July weekend makes me think of specific favorite summertime New Yorker covers. The choices are good and plenty when one decides to select a few favorites from the magazine’s 94 years; for every one shown here, there are at least five more that fall into the fave category — these half dozen are but a fraction of the magazine’s superb summertime covers.

It’s perhaps worth noting that each of the artists below contributed both cartoons and covers to The New Yorker. They all hail from the pre-Tina Brown days when more than 60% of the magazine’s covers were contributed by its cartoonists (a reasonable guess would be that the % now of the magazine’s cartoonists contributing covers is somewhere in the low single digits).

This August 4th 1945 Mary Petty cover has always been a first thought when summer arrives.  The simple quiet moment Ms. Petty gives us during a particularly horrendous moment in history has always fascinated me. This scan doesn’t do justice to Ms. Petty’s watercolors.

Whenever I think of summertime and beaches I think of this Ludwig Bemelmans July 13, 1946  cover. Most will think of Mr. Bemelmans and immediately recall his Madeline books, but his contribution of 32 New Yorker covers was substantial

Here’s a beauty by Anatol Kovarsky from August 2, 1969. If you look through Mr. Kovarsky’s New Yorker covers you’ll see he often returned to aerial views. I’ve always found it amusing that he focused here on the parking lot, with the beach and ocean as supporting players.

Charles Addams’s cover shown below was published the very next week after Mr. Kovarsky’s. It reminds me of the summers during the years I lived in Manhattan, especially the days I headed up to The New Yorker‘s office to drop off my weekly batch of cartoons. The city never seemed hotter, the sidewalks never stickier, the non-air conditioned subway cars never sootier, than on those trips between my apartment in Greenwich Village and 25 West 43rd Street.

 

There are so many wonderful New Yorker baseball covers, but this one by Garrett Price is a particular favorite. 

Finally, this spectacular July 4th 1953 cover by Alajalov.

Here are the Spill’s A-Z entries for each of the above artists. 

 

 

 

 

Mary Petty  Born, Hampton, New Jersey, April 29, 1899. Died, Paramus, New Jersey, March, 1976. New Yorker work: October 22, 1927 – March 19, 1966. Collection: This Petty Place ( Knopf, 1945) with a Preface by James Thurber.

 

Ludwig Bemelmans  Born, April 27, 1898. Died, October 1, 1962. New Yorker work: contributed six cartoons and thirty-two covers as well written pieces in a New Yorker career that began in October of 1937 and lasted until August 1962. He achieved lasting fame with his Madeline childrens books.

 

 

Anatol Kovarsky (photo: NYC, 2013. By Liza Donnelly) Born, Moscow. Died, June 1, 2016, NYC. Collection: Kovarsky’s World (Knopf, 1956) New Yorker work: 1947 -1969. Link to Ink Spill’s  2013 piece, “Anatol Kovarsky at 94: Still Drawing After All These Years”

 

 

Charles Addams  Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

 

Garrett Price ( Photo Source: Esquire Cartoon Album, 1957) Born, 1897, Bucyrus, Kansas. Died, April, 1979, Norwalk, Conn. Collection: Drawing Room Only / A Book of Cartoons (Coward -McCann, 1946). New Yorker work: 1925 -1974.

 

 

Constantin Alajalov  Born Constantin Aladjalov, 1900, Rostov-on-the-Don, Russia. Died Oct., 1987, Amenia, New York. New Yorker work: 1926 -1960. Perhaps best known for his New Yorker covers ( he also supplied cover art to other publications). Key collection: Conversation Pieces (The Studio Publications Inc., 1942) w/ commentary by Janet Flanner. A profile from The Saturday Evening Post.

Society Of Illustrators Names Hall Of Fame Inductees; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Shannon Wheeler; More Gerberg; Event Of Interest: Chris Ware; Even More Shermund; Interviews Of Interest: Bob Eckstein, Gahan Wilson

From The Daily Cartoonist, February 14, 2019, “Society Of illustrators 2019 Hall of Fame” — Read here! (Spoiler: Two New Yorker folks named!)

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon, tuned in to today’s heart-shaped celebration, is by Shannon Wheeler, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009.

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More Gerberg

Mr. Gerberg’s first New Yorker cartoon, published in the issue of April 10, 1965.

From amNewYork, February 14, 2019, “Mort Gerberg retrospective spotlights cartoonnist’s witty views of NY life”

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From The Albany Times-Union, February 12, 2019, Cartoonist Chris Ware Speaks, Signs Books.

Mr. Ware’s Monograph, published in 2017

Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

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Even More Shermund

A Shermund self-portrait

From Columbus Monthly, “Burying Barbara Shermund, A Forgotten Cartoonist” — more on the late great Ms. Shermund. Read here.

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Interview of Interest: Bob Eckstein

Bob Eckstein’s fabulous Snowman book

A radio interview with a lot of snowman talk (as you’d expect when the World’s Greatest Snowman Expert is the interviewee), and some cartoon talk as well at the close. Listen here.

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Interview of Interest: Gahan Wilson

Jason Sacks interviews Gahan Wilson. Listen here.

Mr. Wilson began contributing to The New Yorker in 1976. Link here to his website.