The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 15, 2019; Book Events Of Interest This Week…And A Live Podcast Of Interest; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Lila Ash; Today’s Daily Shouts By J.A.K. & Julia Rothman

The Cover: Play ball!…or…ball in play!  A graphically pleasing cover by Mark Ulriksen.  Read about it here

The Cartoonists:

Note: Brooke Bourgeois is making her New Yorker print debut. Ms. Bourgeois is the 7th new cartoonist added to the stable this year and the 31st added under cartoon editor Emma Allen’s watch.

The Cartoons:  The Spill spotlight falls on three of this week’s cartoons.

Lars Kenseth‘s couple on a stroll (p. 37). Cat’s been out of the bag since a summer of 2017 Spill piece that I’m a fan of Mr. Kenseth’s Deodorant roll-on people. I simply like seeing them, and enjoy the world they inhabit. In this particular drawing the triangular pockets on the fellow’s shirt add to the Kenseth-world fun. 

Jose Arroyo‘s UFO drawing (p.56). I love a good UFO drawing. This is an excellent addition to the canon. The drawing of the fellow being taken up into the spaceship is terrific, as is the caption. 

Ed Steed‘s Repair Shop (p.51).  Mr. Steed goes basic here, and it works beautifully.

The Illustrations (used as an umbrella term to cover drawings and photographs): I’ll just say there are a lot, including 5 1/2 full pages. 

Lastly: No, Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead has not yet returned. Below, the real deal.

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Book Events Of Interest This Week

April 9th, in Manhattan:

A quartet of New Yorker cartoonists: Bob Eckstein with Robert Leighton, Marisa Acocella, and Barbara Smaller. Info on poster, and here.

And, in Manhattan, April 9th, A Live Podcast:

The podcasting duo of Jason Chatfield and Scott Dooley go live. Info here.

Mr. Chatfield began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017. Visit his website here. Mr. Dooley has contributed to newyorker.com.  His website here.

And More Chatfield: A piece on Medium posted April 7, 2019, “The Ten-Step Process of Preparing a Weekly Batch of Cartoons for The New Yorker” (perhaps should’ve been titled “Jason Chatfield’s Ten-Step Process of Preparing a Weekly Batch of Cartoons for The New Yorker”).

April 10th, in Manhattan:

A duo: Mark Alan Stamaty, celebrating the anniversary reissue of MacDoodle Street, with Liana Finck. Info here.

April 10th, in Rhinebeck, NY:

Another quartet of New Yorker cartoonists: Bob Eckstein with Danny Shanahan, Liza Donnelly, and myself.  Info on poster, and here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Today’s Daily, about this now-brief pre-Game of Thrones moment in time, is by Lila Ash. Ms. Ash began contributing to The New Yorker in December of 2018. Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts

“Touristy Things I Still Do After Five Years Of Living in New York” by  J.A.K. (or Jason Adam Katzenstein — your call!) along with Julia Rothman.  Mr. K. began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 25, 2019; Even More George Price; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Lila Ash

The Cover:

As mentioned here last week, the Brexit-inspired cover, by Mark Ulriksen, was early-released.  Read about it here.

The Cartoonists:

Suerynn Lee‘s work has appeared on newyorker.com;  this is her print debut in the magazine. Ms. Lee is the fifth cartoonist to debut this year, and the twenty-ninth cartoonist brought aboard since Emma Allen took the reins of the cartoon department in May of 2017.

The Cartoons:

A quick tour through the issue and we find Roz Chast’s take on the tale of the Little Red Hen, Lars Kenseth’s commemorative pizza plate, Sophia Warren’s office politics mouse maze, Tom Chitty’s genie who specializes in just one thing, P.C. Vey’s couple’s abrupt waking in the night,  a Will McPhail long-lasting roller coaster, Karen Sneider’s desert island delirium, Frank Cotham’s concerned waiter, BEK’s second-guessing God, Victoria Robert’s juggling husband, Harley Lin’s lawyer, client and rubber band ball… and the aforementioned Ms. Lee, with a drawing of Death and the five second rule. Ms. Robert’s and Mr. Chitty’s drawings are given the most breathing room.

Twelve cartoons; Twenty-one illustrations — approximately five-and-a-half of them are full page. 

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Rea Irvin’s Talk masthead masterpiece is still in mothballs. Here’s some reading material about it, and below is what it looks like.

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Even More George Price

Attempted Bloggery continues its Price Fest, with close-up looks at the artist’s originals. See it here!

I’ve always found Price’s split lines intriguing. Sorry I never had the opportunity to ask him about his style.  I only was in the same room (an office) with him once, ages ago — unfortunately it wasn’t the time or place to start asking questions.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Today’s Daily cartoon, regarding twenty somethings, is by Lila Ash.  Ms. Ash began contributing  to The New Yorker in December of 2018. Link here to her website.

 

 

 

 

Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of March 11-15, 2019; About The Upcoming Animated Addams Family; Early Cover Release; Video: Chast At The Strand

The Daily was three-fifths Trump this week.  The contributors:  Brooke Bourgeois, Mary Lawton, Ellis Rosen, Emily Flake, and Jason Chatfield/Scott Dooley.

And the New Yorker cartoonists contributing to the Daily Shouts: Jason Adam Katzenstein/Ellie Black, and Roz Chast.

You can see all of the above and more here.  

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About The Upcoming Animated Addams Family

From Paste, March 15, 2019, “Everything We know About the New Animated Addams Family Movie So Far”

Below left, some of the television cast, and on the right, an Addams drawing of the family.

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Early Cover Release

As happens when the New Yorker is particularly keen on a newsy cover, they let us see it well before the usual Monday morning publication.  And so it is with Mark Ulriksen’s piece above.  Read about it here.

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Chast At The Strand…and in the Newspaper

Mike Lynch has posted a link to a video of the recent Strand bookstore appearance by Roz Chast.  Go here to Mike’s site for the actual video link.

Even more Chast: this piece from The New York Times, March 14, 2019,  “Roz Chast and Patricia Marx Mine the Motherlode”

The Monday Tilley Watch, The (double) New Yorker Issue of July 9 & 16, 2018

A dog in a flotation device on a very watery cover for a double issue in early-to-mid July. The artist Mark Ulriksen talks about his creation here.  My eye wants me to believe that Mr. Ulriksen’s doggie is floating in the air above the surface of marbeilized water.

A delayed Monday Tilley Watch as the digital issue has not yet turned over to July 9th & 16th (it’s still stuck on the issue of July 2nd). The Monday Watch came about because I thought it might be fun taking a look at the cartoons in situ. Without the digital issue today, that’s not possible (my print version won’t arrive for a few more days).

I can see all the cartoons on the newyorker.com slideshow, but for me, that’s less appealing than seeing how they reside on the magazine’s pages. I also love seeing what else is going on in the issue, graphically (such as: has Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead returned yet…you know, things like that).

— So long then, until I have access to the magazine, in one version or another. 

…the latest issue appeared online late Monday afternoon. 

Twelve cartoons in the issue.  Here’re the cartoonists:

Bruce Kaplan’s caption caught my eye this week, as well as his somewhat complex drawing.  Also catching my eye: the number of illustrations (drawings and photographs). There are eighteen with four of them full page (and one of those actually a page-and-a-half).

Usually I don’t mention the cartoon caption page, but I do like Joe Dator’s kites offered up this week. It has a Jack Ziegler feel to it. Perhaps Mr. Dator will reveal his caption (if there was one) once the contest is settled.

Of special note: a nice Charles Addams piece by the cartoonist, Paul Karasik (it appears under the “Sketchbook” heading).

For more on the issue’s cartoons check out the Cartoon Companion at week’s end.

Extra special note: Rea Irvin’s classic masthead is still missing. Here’s what it looks like:

— See you when the next new issue is out, July 16th…seems like a long way off!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of February 26, 2018

Always glad to return to weekly issues of the magazine after doubles. This new issue sports a cover that seems like the sum of the equation: Olympics + North Korea =.

  Here’s what cover artist Mark Ulriksen had to say about it on newyorker.com

The Olympics + North Korea equation continues with the very first spot drawing appearing on the opening page of The Talk of The Town. And, as long as we’re mentioning that page,  let’s get this out of the way: Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead is still a-missin’.  Here’s what it looks like:

Could be wrong, but it seems like there are slightly more Otto Soglow spot drawings scattered throughout Talk than usual (along with Tom Bachtell’s always top-notch drawings). 

Doesn’t take long to get to the first cartoon of the issue (it’s on page 18). P.C. Vey delivers a very P.C. Vey-like piece of work (that’s always a good thing).  Love the little fish Mr. Vey has drawn, but wish it was still swimmin’. Five pages later Lars Kenseth takes us to the land of the pitchman. Funny drawing. Love how Mr. Kenseth uses the language. I did something in that vein a long time back — in the New Yorker, April 6, 1981, to be exact.  I remember it being a ton-o-fun playing with the structure of the television pitch. 

On the very next page one of my favorite subjects: the old west (or possibly it’s a cowboy and his horse in the contemporary west).  Zach Kanin’s coffee-drinking horse is well drawn.  I wish the cowboy’s face was easier to see on the digital edition — this is where print (might) come in handy. 

Nine pages later, a well-placed-on-the-page Frank Cotham cartoon. Cartoonists usually love to show gangsters about to toss a guy off a pier.  Mr. Cotham gives us a prequel. Nice.

Four pages later Roz Chast with an at-home Olympics moment.  A very Chastian drawing any which way you look at it. Another four pages brings us to the second-ever New Yorker drawing (unless I’m mistaken) by Olivia de Recat.  Similar to her first in that it’s mostly text. This one is approximately 97% text (handwritten text).  Her first was perhaps 91% text.  Though we don’t see them as much as we used to, the aforementioned Ms. Chast has done a number of text-driven (to use a Tina Brown era term) drawings over the years. Without doing research (unforgivable, I know!) I’m going out on a limb by suggesting Ms. Chast may have pioneered this particular form of New Yorker cartoon. If anyone wants to shoot that down, please contact me.

Five pages later, Maddie Dai weighs in on a fellow’s mid-life crisis times two.  His motorcycle (which lacks a gas tank — maybe it’s one of those new electric bikes) has at least one (unintentional?) funny feature: the bike’s training wheels are attached to the hub of the rear wheel.  If this cartoon bike was a real bike the training wheels would spin around with the tire, complicating things even further for the crisis guy.  No matter — it’s a nice drawing. 

On the very next page, a debut New Yorker cartoon by Navied Mahdavian*, that answers the oft-asked question, “What did we do before the internet?” Funny drawing.

Four pages later, veteran cartoonist, Mick Stevens gives us death having just died.  Looking at Mr. Stevens’ drawing I asked myself if this fell into the double negative column.  If death dies, isn’t death then alive? Way too much of a headache-inducing thought for this cartoonist (me, not Mr. Stevens).

Eight pages later Sara Lautman takes us to a contemporary bar moment. Found myself studying the shelves and bottles of booze in the background.  There’s a Robert Weber-ish looseness to that area.

Seven pages later a Bruce Eric Kaplan gem of a caption.  And on the very next page, the last drawing of the issue (not counting those on the Caption Contest page).  Liana Finck gives us a bird chase. Not sure what the surface is that they are on — is it pavement with a sidewalk in the rear?  It probably doesn’t matter.  The big bird — the one that’s chasing the little bird —  has an expression indicating confidence she/he will succeed, despite the lack of arms. 

*For those keeping track, Navied Mahdavian is the thirteenth new cartoonist introduced under the magazine’s current cartoon editor, Emma Allen, since she was appointed in May of 2017, and the second newbie introduced so far in 2018.

— See you next Monday