Cartoonist Event Of The Month: “Funny Ladies At The New Yorker” With Roz Chast, Liza Donnelly, And Liana Finck In Conversation Via The Society Of Illustrators; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

From The Society of Illustrators, this news of a live online chat with Roz Chast, Liza Donnelly, and Liana Finck, May 27th at 6:30.  All the info here.

Here are the Spill‘s entries for each of these fine cartoonists:

Roz Chast ( Photo: Bill Franzen) Born, Brooklyn, NY. New Yorker work: 1978 –. Key collection: Theories of Everything ( Bloomsbury, 2006). Her book, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?: A Memoir (Bloomsbury, 2014) was a National Book Awards finalist (nonfiction) in 2014.  Website

Liza Donnelly  Born, Washington, D.C.. New Yorker work: June 21, 1982 –. Key book: Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005).  Donnelly is the innovator of a form of visual journalism, covering news and cultural events by digitally drawing them in real time and sharing them.  Website

 

Liana Finck ( Photo: John Madere) Born in 1986. New Yorker work: February 25, 2013 –. Studied at Cooper Union College, 2004 – 2008. Fulbright Fellowship to Brussels, 2009. Passing For Human was published in 2018 by Random House.  Website.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Jeremy Nguyen on escaping. Mr. Nguyen has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Visit his website here.

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Podcast Of Interest With Liza Donnelly; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

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Not too long ago before NYC largely shut down, Liza Donnelly dropped by The Comic Strip Live where she was a guest on Jane Condon’s podcast, Funny Over 50.

Listen here.

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.  Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Home officing it, by Teresa Burns Parkhurst who began contributing to The New Yorker in October of 2017.

 

Thurber Thursday: Personal History — The Thurber Article That Caused Me To Fly

Thurber Thursday: Personal History — The Thurber Article That Caused Me To Fly

When I ran across the above small article in early 1987, I was in my mid 30s, and had yet to step foot in an airplane. I drove anywhere I needed to go outside of the New York/Metropolitan area.  At the time the furthest south I’d traveled was Washington, D.C., the furthest north, Montreal; the furthest east: Eastport, Maine; the furthest west, Altoona, Pennsylvania (and that was by accident — I got lost taking a friend to State College, Pa).

But the idea of traveling to Ohio by car seemed, well, exhausting, so I agreed to fly to Columbus with fellow New Yorker cartoonist & Thurber fanatic (and soon to be wife), Liza Donnelly.  We booked a room at the Great Southern Hotel, where Thurber’s 92 celebratory drawings were hung, and flew out to Columbus in late February. Did I enjoy the flight? No. I can’t even go on a see-saw without experiencing “issues,” so being in a plane wasn’t fun. But what we found in Columbus was worth the anxiety of being up in the air.

The morning we arrived in Columbus we immediately headed over to The Thurber House. It wasn’t open yet, so Liza and I took pictures of each other on the front steps. We were standing on the porch of the house where the bed fell and the ghost got in… unbelievable.

We later toured the house, using this swell guide:

What can I say?  Being in the house was, for Thurber obsessives, probably comparable (if, say, you’re a Beatlemaniac) to traveling to Abbey Road and walking on the famous crosswalk.

Of our short stay at the Great Southern Hotel (shown left), I don’t remember our room, or even the hotel itself (other than it was enormous).

What I do remember was walking the hallways lined with original Thurber drawings. I can’t remember focusing on any one drawing while there  — the submersion was overwhelming. Luckily, the organizers provided a catalog of all the work shown.

So, yes, the flight was worth it (I would’ve preferred driving back home though). Other than flying home to New York from Columbus, the next time I flew was five years later… back to Columbus for this event at the Thurber House:

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 4, 2020

The Cover: In Francoise Mouly’s Q&A with this week’s cover artist, Chris Ware, she informs us that the issue is anchored by “a kaleidoscopic account of a single day in New York.”  And so we see a cover, in Mr. Ware’s patented style, loaded with snapshots of the city —  a cover nearly devoid of people.

The Cartoonists:

Liza Donnelly, Robert Leighton, Amy Hwang, Roz Chast, Mick Stevens, Liana Finck, Julia Suits, Frank Cotham, Lars Kenseth, Peter Steiner, Karl Stevens, Edward Steed, Elisabeth McNair, Ali Solomon

The Cartoons:

First thing I noticed zipping through this week’s cartoons (via the slideshow on newyorker.com) is that 9 of the 14 drawings contain non-humans. Is this unusual? I don’t know; haven’t kept track of the human/non-human ratio of the cartoons over the years [if anyone has, please let me know — I’d love to see the numbers]. What may be unusual are the three drawings in a row containing two animals apiece: Ed Steed’s two cows, Elisabeth McNair’s pig and squirrel, and Ali Solomon’s two seals.

The remaining half-dozen cartoons featuring non-humans: Peter Steiner’s shark (fins), Lars Kenseth’s multitude of rabbits, Roz Chast’s cow, Liana Finck’s dog(?), and Amy Hwang’s snails. This week’s lead cartoon, by Liza Donnelly, is a direct nod to NYC’s shut-down (it features a none-too-pleased caged subway rat).

The high percentage of animals in the issue reminded me of this passage from Brendan Gill’s Here At The New Yorker:

“Once, Geraghty [the magazine’s Art editor from 1939-1973] mentioned to me that the art department ‘bank’ contained a deplorably high number of jokes featuring conversations between animals. I proposed that the artwork of an entire issue of the magazine be devoted to talking-animal jokes, thus reducing the bank and just possibly causing our readers to lose their minds.  My proposal was accepted, the issue came out, and as far as the magazine could judge, the prank went largely unobserved.” 

Other Cartoons That Caught My Eye:

It seemed pre-ordained that Roz Chast would do a panic buying drawing. Love her (signed) photo drawing of “Der Bingle.” Mick Stevens’s me time drawing is a fine/fun piece of work; applause applause for the way Frank Cotham handled the damned in his splendid media attention drawing. I’ve no idea how Mr. Cotham’s cartoon is sized (I don’t have access to the digital edition yet) but this cartoon would certainly work beautifully on a half-page.  (Update, now that the digital issue is available:  Mr. Cotham’s drawing has been run a bit larger than most of the issue’s cartoons…not a half-page tho.)

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Without having the digital issue in front of me I’ve no idea if Mr. Irvin’s classic Talk masthead (below), shown the door, and replaced by a redraw in the Spring of 2017, has finally returned.  Here’s more information on it.(Update: the redraw still appears. The classic remains in storage)

Behold the real deal!

 

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Peter Kuper’s NYTs Silent Spring Piece; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Liza Donnelly’s World Wildlife Fund Earth Day Drawings; The Weekly Humorist’s Cartoon Desk

Peter Kuper’s New York Times Silent Spring Piece

From The New York Times Book Review, this graphic review of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring by Peter Kuper, who’s on a roll this week — he also has a full page color Comic Strip in The New Yorker.

(read a little about it here at The Daily Cartoonist; a link is supplied to Mr. Kuper’s piece in the New Yorker)

 

Mr. Kuper’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Peter Kuper Born, 1958, Summit, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 6, 2011 – . Website: peterkuper.com  For more biographical information, visit his Wikipedia page.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

An Earth Day cartoon from Avi Steinberg.

Mr. Steinberg has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2012.

 

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Liza Donnelly Draws For The World Wildlife Fund’s Art For Nature

From Twitter, this screen grab showing the info:

Ms. Donnelly has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1982. Visit her website here.

…More Donnelly (& company): From The AAEC, “Live From Their Home Studios — Cartoonists Online” — this piece on various online exploits from members of the  American Association of Editorial Cartoonists.

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The Weekly Humorist’s Cartoon Desk

The other day the Spill mentioned The American Bystander’s  dedicated page for cartoons; here’s another place to go to see a variety of cartoonists. The Weekly Humorist‘s Cartoon Desk includes a goodly number of New Yorker cartoonists, including Bob Eckstein, Ali Solomon, Michael Shaw, Kim Warp, Peter Kuper, David Ostow, Pat Byrnes, Lila Ash, Ivan Ehlers, Jason Chatfield, Cerise Zelenetz, Lars Kenseth, Evan Lian, and Rich Sparks.  Visit it here!