The New York Times Nurit Karlin Obit; Cover Revealed For Liana Finck’s “Excuse Me”; Article Of Interest: Rowland B. Wilson; A Sempe Illustrated Story To Be Animated; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Avi Steinberg

The New York Times Nurit Karlin Obit

From The New York Times, May 7, 2019, “Nurit Karlin, Who Found Her Voice In Wordless Cartoons, Dies At 80”

Above: Liza Donnelly, on the left, with Ms. Karlin in Tel Aviv in 2017.  Far right: A Nurit Karlin self-portrait

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Cover Revealed For Liana Finck’s “Excuse Me”

Due September 24th from Random House Trade Paperbacks, Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, and Notes to Self promises to be a fun 416 page collection by Ms. Finck, who began contributing cartoons to The New Yorker in 2013. 

 

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Article of Interest: Rowland B. Wilson

From the Art Contrarian, May 6, 2019, “The Carefully Observant Rowland B. Wilson” — this piece on Mr. Wilson who contributed 47 cartoons to The New Yorker from 1961 – 1981.

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Sempe Illustrated Story To Be Animated

From Cartoon Brew, May 6, 2019, “Goscinny and Sempe’s ‘Le Petit Nicholas’ to be Adapted as 2D Animated Film by On Entertainment” 

Mr. Sempe began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978. 

(a tip of the hat to Mike Lynch, whose social media post brought this piece to my attention).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

A Game Of Thrones coffee cup inspires today’s Daily cartoon (…by Avi Steinberg, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012. 

 

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The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 13, 2019; Ed Steed Goes To The Stadium; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Teresa Burns Parkhurst

The Cover: according to the Contributors page, this a Diana Ejaita’s first cover for the magazine. Read more here. 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons: Eleven cartoons this week — a lighter number than usual.  Just out of curiosity I went back to a comparable issue (date-wise) forty years ago.  This was the cartoonist line-up for the issue of May 14, 1979. Twenty-two cartoonists. 

The irony, if there is any irony here (and if you read on, you’ll see there may not be) is that back then there were far fewer regular contributors (in what was then called the art department) than there are today. At least half as many. But then again, that 1979 issue was 176 pages. This new one is 70 pages. So proportionally, not bad(?).

Rea Irvin: And speaking of the past, Rea Irvin’s Talk masthead (below) is still a-missin’. Read about it here.

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Ed Steed at Yankee Stadium

From newyorker.com‘s Culture Desk, May 5, 2019, “Edward Steed visits Yankee Stadium”

— Mr. Steed applies his signature style to The House That Ruth Built (or should we say, to the house now standing next to the House That Ruth Built).

If you’re wondering if any New Yorker cartoonist had ever visited and drawn Yankee Stadium before: Liza Donnelly did (for CBS News) in 2017.  You can see the piece here.

Below: Ms. Donnelly in the Yankee’s dugout with Yankee shortstop, Didi Gregorius, watching him try-out drawing on her iPad.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/ Cartoon

Teresa Burns Parkhurst, on Spring. Ms. Parkhurst first began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

 

 

Nurit Karlin 1938-2019: “I Used To Doodle, Then Something Would Be There.”

Word has reached us that the New Yorker cartoonist Nurit Karlin has passed away in Israel. Ms. Karlin’s first New Yorker cartoon ran in the issue of March 18, 1974.  At the time she was the only female cartoonist whose work was appearing in the magazine (the last before her was Mary Petty, who passed away in 1976, but whose final contribution to the magazine was in the issue of March 19, 1966). Ms. Karlin was the only female cartoonist in the pages of The New Yorker from April of 1966 through July of 1978 when Roz Chast’s first cartoon was published. Ms. Karlin went on to draw 77 cartoons for the magazine.  Her last was published October 24, 1988.

Above: Nurit Karlin’s first New Yorker drawing.

According to Liza Donnellys Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons, Ms. Karlin, born in Jerusalem…always drew as a child…after a few years of art school (The Bezalel School of Art) she came to the United States in 1964 to study animation [at The School of Visual Arts]tg. She began working for The New York Times in the Book Review and Op-ed sections.

In 2005 she told Ms. Donnelly: “I don’t think I thought of being a cartoonist. I did these things, and The New Yorker never crossed my mind.” She called the magazine, expecting to get an appointment with [Lee] Lorenz [The New Yorker‘s art editor], but was told to drop off her work. “With me, you know, if they hadn’t taken one from the first batch, I wouldn’t have gone back.”  With that first submission, Lorenz asked to see her.  Donnelly asked Karlin how she got her ideas: “If I knew where they came from, I would be the first in line! I used to doodle, then something would be there.”

 Nurit Karlin (on the right) in Tel Aviv, June, 2017 with Liza Donnelly.  Photo by Daniel Kenet

It is quite understandable, as Ms. Donnelly wrote in Funny Ladies, that Karlin’s work was in the “same realm” as Steinberg’s. Both shared the love of the possibilities of the pen line itself. With Ms. Karlin the results were often more resolved with the one-two punch delivery of the single panel cartoon. Showing her roots in animation, she sometimes used a series of drawings to deliver the punch (I’ve always thought of Ms. Karlin on the outskirts of the school of Thurber although I have no idea if she saw her work that way. The one occasion I had to speak with her, many years ago at a Playboy cartoonist function, the subject didn’t come up).

What is certain about her work is that it was firmly in the school of visual art. If you look through her 1978 collection, No Comment, you’ll be hard pressed to find a captioned drawing  — there isn’t one.  She used words in her cartoons, but sparingly, as in the drawing below from the issue of September 4, 1978.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auction Of Interest: Press Forward Auction Includes Cartoonists Galore!

News of an auction of cartoon art (both original work and prints) to support Press Forward. According to their website PF is an independent initiative whose mission is to change culture in newsrooms.

Also to be auctioned are a number of fun experiences including this:

 Behind the Scenes Experience with New Yorker Editor David Remnick and Cartoon Editor, Emma Allen

Some of the work up for auction is already online, and can be seen here. More art will be available online prior to the live auction/party in Washington, D.C., May 8th.  The Spill will update as art is added online.

Here’s the invite to the event. Link here to RSVP.

Below:  a list of the artists whose work is up for grabs:

 

New Yorker cartoonists:

Kim Warp

Amy Hwang

Liza Donnelly

Michael Maslin

Emily Flake

Peter Kuper

Christopher Weyant  

 

New Yorker cover artists:

Barry Blitt  

John Cuneo  

 

Pulitzer Prize winner Editorial Cartoonists:

Signe Wilkinson  (the first woman to win Pulitzer) (Philadelphia Daily News)

Ann Telnaes  (The Washington Post)

Jim Morin (independent)

Matt Wuerker (Politico)

Joel Pett (The Lexington Herald-Leader)

 

Editorial Cartoonists:

Ed Hall (independent)

Rob Rogers (independent)

Jen Sorenson  (Daily Kos)

Chip Bok (Akron Beacon Journal)

Keith Knight (syndicated)

Tom Toles  (The Washington Post)

Pat Bagley (The Salt Lake Tribune)

Jake Tapper (CNN / State of the Cartoonian)

Jeff Danziger (independent)

Sage Stossel (The Atlantic)

Lisa Benson  (independent)