A George Booth Film!; A Q&A Of Interest: Ellis Rosen; The Traveling Cartoon Museum; Liza Donnelly To Judge Cartoons In Cuba; More From The Dick Buchanan Files Via Mike Lynch; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Peter Kuper

A George Booth Film!

Happy to report that a George Booth film is in the works. Mr. Booth is, of course, one of the gods of The New Yorker‘s cartoon world.  This year marks his 50th year at the magazine.  Read about the film and George Booth, and see a Kickstarter teaser clip here.

Here’s Mr. Booth’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

George Booth (photo above taken in NYC 2016, courtesy of Liza Donnelly) Born June 28, 1926, Cainesville, MO. New Yorker work: 1969 – . Key collections: Think Good Thoughts About A Pussycat (Dodd, Mead, 1975), Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead, 1976), Omnibooth: The Best of George Booth ( Congdon & Weed, 1984), The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz ( Workman, 1998).

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A Q&A Of Interest: Ellis Rosen

From Unsettled, “Q&A With Ellis Rosen, Cartoonist And illustrator For The New Yorker” 

Mr. Ellis began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.  Visit his website here.

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The Traveling Cartoon Museum

The Museum of Cartoon Art first caught my attention in September of 1980 when the article above appeared in The New York Times. Since then the museum has moved about a good deal (for a museum). This is a good catching up article about its travels: “The Rocky History of Connecticut’s Cartoon Museum” — from the CTPost, March 21, 2019.

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Liza Donnelly To Judge Cartoons In Cuba

Liza Donnelly, that globe-trotting New Yorker cartoonist (she was live-drawing on China’s Great Wall not long ago; she’s shown above live-drawing at a conference in Brussels last week) is off to Cuba in a few days to join in the judging of cartoons for the 21st Bienal International De Humorismo Grafico.  Info here.

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More From The Dick Buchanan Files Via Mike Lynch

Dick Buchanan continues to share his incredible cartoon tear sheet collection via Mike Lynch’s blog. Without Mr. Buchanan (and Mr. Lynch), such great work as Gahan Wilson’s cartoon from Collier’s (shown above) might be lost to the ages.

This is how Mike introduced the latest Buchanan Files:

Thank you, you lovely, crazy Dick Buchanan, for diving into your files in your Greenwich Village apartment so many times and coming up with these pretty-much-unseen-since-publication single panel cartoons. These are, as you will see, crazy good.

See all the work here.

And speaking of Gahan Wilson, the GOFundMe campaign for him is still underway.  Go here to read more, and contribute.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Today’s Daily cartoon, Trump not letting go, not letting up, is by Peter Kuper. Mr. Kuper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011. Link to his website here.

The Wednesday Tilley Watch… Article Of Interest: Gahan Wilson; Meet Tom Chitty; Liza Donnelly At SXSW; Short-Listed For The Cartoonist Studio Prize: Summer Pierre, Liana Finck, Tom Tomorrow, Hartley Lin, and Gabrielle Bell; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Ellis Rosen

Article Of Interest: Gahan Wilson

From the Sag Harbor Express, March 12, 2019, “A Call For Help For A World-Famous Cartoonist, Formerly Of Sag Harbor” — a good article about the ailing New Yorker cartoonist and the GoFundMe campaign underway to help him.

(photo: Mr. Wilson and his late wife, Nancy, with a Gahan Wilson character between them, 1970)

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Meet Tom Chitty

From Playjunkie, March 12,2019, “Meet Cartoonist Tom Chitty And his Humorous Work”  — a short piece with examples of Mr. Chitty’s drawings.

Mr. Chitty began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014. Link here to his website

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Liza Donnelly At SXSW

Liza Donnelly spoke and live-drew at SXSW last week.  Here’s an article from interrobang mentioning her appearance.

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.  Link here to her website.

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Pete Holmes Crashing Ends

From Vulture, March 8, 2019, “Pete Holmes Crashing Shall Crash On HBO No More”.

Mr. Holmes began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006.  Link here to his website.

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Short-Listed For The Cartoonist Studio Prize: Summer Pierre, Liana Finck, Hartley Lin, Tom Tomorrow, and Gabrielle Bell

From Slate, March 11, 2019,   “The Cartoonist Studio Prize: The Short List”

Among those short-listed are these New Yorker contributors (their New Yorker debut years are listed beside their names):

Summer Pierre (2018).

Liana Finck (2013).

 Hartley Lin (2019).

Tom Tomorrow (1999).

Gabrielle Bell (2017).

Congrats to all!

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Today’s Daily

 Today’s Daily cartoon, by Ellis Rosen, is related to the higher education cheatin’ scandal.  Mr. Rosen began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Link here to his website.

 

 

 

 

 

Ms. Pierre’s piece appeared on newyorker.com in December of 2018. Her website.

 

 

 

Book On The Horizon…”A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber”; Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly; Audio Of Interest: Roz Chast; Audio Of Interest: Bob Eckstein: Chris Ware In School; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Farley Katz

Coming this July from Ohio State University Press,  A Mile And A Half of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber.

Edited by Michael Rosen, with contributions from Rosemary Thurber, Liza Donnelly, Seymour Chwast, Ian Frazier, and yours truly.

From the publisher:

Humorist, cartoonist, writer, playwright. James Thurber was to the twentieth century what Mark Twain was to the nineteenth. At one point, his books were the most read of any American in the world. His work could be found anywhere—from the pages of the New Yorker to the pages of children’s books, from illustrated advertisements to tea towels and dresses. Now, in celebration of the 125th anniversary of Thurber’s birth, A Mile and a Half of Lines: The Art of James Thurber is a long overdue introduction and reintroduction to James Thurber and the artwork that fundamentally changed American cartoons. Including some 260 drawings, this collection is the first comprehensive focus on his work as an artist, a cartoonist, and an illustrator.

Coinciding with the first major retrospective of Thurber’s art presented by the Columbus Museum of Art in 2019, A Mile and a Half of Lines showcases both classic Thurber as well as visual material never before seen in print.

 

Here’s James Thurber’s entry on Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

James Thurber Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

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Video of Interest: Liza Donnelly

Liza Donnelly was just out in Silicon Valley live-drawing at the Global Women In Data Science Conference. A short video here about her work

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.  Here’s her website.

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Radio Interview of Interest: Bob Eckstein

A lot of fun snowman talk in this half -hour radio interview with Mr. Eckstein, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007. (scroll down to February 13, 2019).

Mr. Eckstein is also the editor of this upcoming cartoon anthology:

Link here to Bob Eckstein’s website.

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Radio Interview of Interest: Roz Chast

From WBAI (NYC), March 6, 2019, this hour-long interview with Roz Chast.

Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978.  Here’s her website.

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Chris Ware In School

From Skidmore College, March 6, 2019, “Cartoonist Chris Ware Talks Art careers”  — Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.  

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

 Facebook is the subject of today’s Daily, courtesy of cartoonist Farley Katz.  Mr. Katz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.  Here’s his website.

 

 

New Yorker Cartoon Editor Emma Allen Interviews Mort Gerberg; Graphic Novels For Adults: Liza Donnelly Talks About Her Oscar Drawings; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Christopher Weyant

Here’s The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, speaking with Mort Gerberg on the occasion of his 50th year in cartooning. Mr. Gerberg’s first New Yorker cartoon appeared in the issue of April 10, 1965.

Link here to his website.

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Graphic Novels For Adults

From The New Indian Express, February 27, 2019, “Sketchy affair: Graphic novels are for adults too” — with references to Shannon Wheeler, Chris Ware, and Art Spiegelman.

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Liza Donnelly Talks About Live-Drawing From the 2019 Oscars Red Carpet

 

From Medium, February 25, 2019, “Live Drawing The 201 Academy Awards” — Liza Donnelly talks about her 4th time on the Red Carpet and shows us all of her drawings from Oscar week. Ms. Donnelly’s first cartoon appeared in the June 21, 1982 issue of The New Yorker.

Link here to Ms. Donnelly’s website.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon, Trump-centered with a dash of Cohen, is by Christopher Weyant.  Mr. Weyant began contributing the The New Yorker in 1998.

Book Of Interest: Margaret Case Harriman’s The Vicious Circle: The Story Of The Algonquin Round Table; It’s Oscar Day!

There are a good number of places to read about the beginnings of The New Yorker by people who were there at the beginning. Jane Grant’s Ross, The New Yorker And Me is one (Ms. Grant was married to Harold Ross during the birth of the magazine), and then there’s Corey Ford’s The Time Of Laughter (mentioned here not long ago).

The Vicious Circle by Margaret Case Harriman (published in 1951 by Rinehart)) is another gem. Ms. Harriman’s middle name might look familiar to anyone who’s read Frank Case’s Tales Of A Wayward Inn, published in 1938. Mr. Case (Ms. Harriman’s father) owned the Algonquin Hotel during the time the Roundtable played its part helping spawn The New Yorker.

The fabulous cover is by the late great (non-New Yorker artist) Al Hirschfeld. Back in 2015 Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery posted illustrations from the book (see them here). I used the cover for my own purposes here on the Spill some time back to head the Posted Notes section:

If you have The Vicious Circle in hand and want to head right into the New Yorker material, go to The Birth Of The New Yorker on page 171. One of my favorite paragraphs concerns this description of the magazine’s founder and first editor, Harold Ross, at the art meeting:

Ross’s searchlight gaze is equally busy on the drawings that go into the magazine. At art meetings he will stare gloomily at a drawing and mutter, “Who’s talking?” This means the picture will go back to the artist to have the speaker’s mouth opened wider. Or he will twist his long body around to peer at the perspective of another cartoon from every angle, and then inquire plaintively, “Where am I supposed to be?” No detail of The New Yorker is too minute to escape his deep attention, and any flaw personally afflicts him, because his standard is perfection. As Russell Maloney once wrote of him, “perfection, in the mind of Harold Ross, is not a goal or an ideal, but something that belongs to him, like his watch or his hat.

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It’s Oscar Day!

Follow Liza Donnelly on Twitter @Lizadonnelly as she draws live on the Red Carpet.

Here’s a photo of her taken yesterday as she checked-out red carpet preparations (and of course drew the preparations) for tonight’s big show.