The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of March 23, 2020: No GOAT

The Cover: This week’s cover, by Christoph Niemann is right on the money. The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, has a Q&A with the artist here.

Historical Note:  this is the first issue of The New Yorker  not to include a Goings On About Town section. A notice appears on this week’s Table of Contents.

A potted history of GOAT (as it’s sometimes affectionately called)

The very first issue of The New Yorker  included a “conscientious calendar of events worth while” called Goings On.  The very first Goings On was just one page, near the back of the book. Below is the heading of that first Goings On.

The Goings On heading survived up through the issue of October 31, 1925. Goings On About Town was used for the very first time in the next issue (November 7, 1925). Goings On About Town was moved to the very front of the magazine in the issue of January 23, 1926.

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And now back to the present…and this week’s issue.

The Cartoonists:

Once again, I’ve posted the entire listing of artists as this week’s Spots are by the fab cover artist, Marcellus Hall.

There is a newbie this week: Matilda Borgstrom, who is the third new cartoonist to enter The New Yorker‘s stable of cartoonists this year, and the fifty-sixth new cartoonist brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

The Cartoons:

There are, as you would expect, a number of cartoons (“Drawings”) this week reflecting directly or indirectly the times we’re in: Roz Chast’s store front sign referencing hand sanitizer and face masks, Frank Cotham’s castle cleaning crew, Liza Donnelly’s kitchen full of fermented food, Emily Flake’s monster coming out of a closet.

The remaining cartoons take us away for awhile– as we’d want them to; the variety includes a mermaid, a couple of cowboys, a typing kitty, stargazers…and more.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Virus, or no virus, the watch continues. Read about Mr. Irvin’s moth-balled iconic Talk masthead here.

Here’s what we’re no longer seeing:

 

 

Thurber Thursday; James Stevenson’s Hat Trick Issue Of The New Yorker: March 22, 1969; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; From The Department Of “What The…?”

Thurber Thursday

Here’s an oddity from the Spill’s archive. An eight page pamphlet containing James Thurber’s speech delivered upon receiving the Ohioana Sesquicentennial Medal. The Citation reads (in part): In appreciation of your generosity of spirit…originality of concept…your matchless satire…at times pure wit…oft times gentle humor…your priceless gift of laughter…boon to disturbed mankind…In recognition of the world wide fame you have bestowed on the state of Ohio and your home town of Columbus the pleasure you have given readers round the globe.

Thurber couldn’t be there in person to accept, so his speech was read by the then editor of The Columbus Dispatch. The award was presented in October of 1954.  It included this oft-cited passage:

I have lived in the East for nearly thirty years now, but many of my books prove that I am never very far away from Ohio in my thoughts, and that the clocks that strike in my dreams are often the clocks of Columbus.

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James Stevenson’s Hat Trick Issue Of The New Yorker: March 22, 1969

Look closely at the above table of contents and you’ll see James Stevenson’s name appears three times. He’s credited with the piece, “Notes From an Exhibition”; he’s credited with the cover, and he is credited with contributing a cartoon, under “Drawings.” Perhaps — perhaps! — we shouldn’t be surprised that Mr. Stevenson’s work was all over the place in the issue. He is believed to be the most prolific New Yorker contributor of all time (if you add up his cartoons, his covers and his written contributions). This weighty presence in the magazine is best exhibited in the Sally William’s documentary,  Stevenson: Lost And Found,* when the filmmaker animates Mr. Stevenson’s black binders piling up in the magazine’s library. Every New Yorker contributor’s work is added into a binder.  If you’ve contributed  a lot of work, you end up with your own binder. If your work exceeds the binder’s page limit, you get a second binder, and so on.  Mr. Stevenson has five binders in the magazine’s library. They look like this:

A fun fact about the above Table of Contents: The New Yorker that appeared the week before had a Table of Contents that looked (exactly) like the one shown below. For a magazine that rarely (in those days) messed with its design, this change to a more informative Table of Contents was a very big thing. The next time The Table Of Contents design changed was the issue of October 5, 1992 — the debut issue of Tina Brown’s editorship.

*It was announced just yesterday that Stevenson: Lost and Found has been selected to screen at The Newport Beach Film Festival, Salem Film Fest, and Block Island Film Festival.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Teresa Burns Parkhurst on VP Pence’s new job assignment. Ms. Parkhurst has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017.

 

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From the Department of “What The…?”

During one of my many daily Google searches for New Yorker cartoonist news, this special little box shown below titled “New Yorker Illustrators” turned up (I’ve provided a screenshot).  I wasn’t searching for New Yorker illustrators — this came to me unbidden. Of the several things wrong with this offered selection, besides the glaring one sitting dead center, is that only one of the people shown — Mr. Niemann — is a New Yorker illustrator (unless Trump does illustration work on the side I’m not aware of). And okay, okay, I’ll  add the obvious “quip”: I never thought Donald Trump would get between me and my wife.

 

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Radio Interview Of Interest: Bob Eckstein; “Downhill” Cast Members Take A Shot At The New Yorker’s Caption Contest; Today’s Daily Shouts & Daily Cartoon

Radio Interview Of Interest: Bob Eckstein

Here’s a recent radio interview with the indefatigable Bob Eckstein (shown above, working while waiting, at The Society of Illustrators). From wfuv.org, February 19, 2020, “In Conversation: Author- Cartoonist Bob Eckstein”

Mr. Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. His latest book is Everyone’s A Critic: The Ultimate Cartoon Book (Princeton Architectural Press). His next — the third in the Ultimate Cartoon Book series, All Is Fair In Love And War: The Ultimate Cartoon Book has just been listed on Amazon (no cover yet!). It will be out this October.

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Video Of Interest: “Downhill” Cast Members Take A Shot At The New Yorker’s Caption Contest

 “Downhill” cast members (l-r) Zoe Chao, Zach Woods, Will Ferrell, and Julia Louis-Dreyfus caption cartoons by Harry Bliss, Michael Crawford, Tom Cheney (twice), and Liza Donnelly (whose cartoon appears on the easel in the above screen grab). Watch the video here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts & Daily Cartoon

Daily Shouts: “Robot-Themed Movie Ideas For Our Robot-Dominated Future”

The Daily Cartoon: qualifying for the debate.

Film Of Interest: Wes Anderson’s New Yorker-ish “The French Dispatch”; Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly On Oscar’s Red Carpet; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s); New York Times Piece Of Interest: Tina Brown

Film Of Interest: Wes Anderson’s New Yorker-ish “The French Dispatch”

From The New Yorker‘s Culture Desk, February 11, 2020,  “A Look At Wes Anderson’s New, New Yorker-Inspired Film” this should be fun.

Above: the poster, which resembles a certain magazine’s cover. Read more here.

Above: Bill Murray as the magazine’s editor, Arthur Howitzer, Jr. — a character “inspired by Harold Ross, The New Yorker‘s founding editor…[with] a dash of A.J. Liebling.”

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Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly On Oscar’s Red Carpet

From Fab TV, this YouTube video of Liza Donnelly on Oscar’s Red Carpet this past Sunday.

Ms. Donnelly, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982, has posted all of her Red Carpet drawings on Medium.

For more info visit Liza Donnelly’s website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s)

Brendan Loper on the field of Democratic Presidential candidates.

Mr. Loper began contributing to in 2016.

Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Lila Ash on too many caucuses. Ms. Ash began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018. See more of her work here.

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New York Times Magazine Piece Of Interest: Tina Brown

From The New York Times Magazine, “Tina Brown on the future of the royal family” — Don’t be fooled by the title, this piece by Dave Marchese, includes a good bit of New Yorker talk.

Left: Edward Sorel‘s cover for Ms. Brown’s first issue of The New Yorker (October 5, 1992).

 

 

Liza Donnelly Returns To Oscar’s Red Carpet; A New Yorker State Of Mind: Thurber’s First New Yorker Drawing; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of February 3-7, 2020

Liza Donnelly Returns To Oscar’s Red Carpet

Liza Donnelly will be back on Oscar’s Red Carpet tomorrow night for her fifth year of live-drawing.  Five years ago she made Oscar history by being the very first cartoonist to draw while on the Red Carpet. She began posting drawings yesterday, and will continue posting today, leading up to her coverage of tomorrow night’s big shindig. Follow her on Instagram & Twitter: @lizadonnelly

Above: Ms. Donnelly yesterday on the mostly still-covered red carpet.

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Thurber’s First New Yorker Drawing

A Spill fave blog, A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker, takes a close look at the issue of January 31, 1931, which boasts James Thurber’s inaugural New Yorker cartoon appearance. Read it here.

According to Edwin T. Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography (Ohio State University Press, 1968), Thurber’s previous published drawing appeared in his college’s magazine,Ohio State’s Sun-Dial, March 1918.

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A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features during the week

The Daily Cartoon:

Ellis Rosen, Jon Adams, J.A.K., Chris Weyant, Trevor Spaulding

Daily Shouts: Ali Fitzgerald, J.A.K., Olivia de Recat (with Sarah Vollman)

...and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.