The Wednesday Spill: Daily Cartoonists & Cartoons; Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly Takes You On A Tour Of Her Exhibit At The Norman Rockwell Museum

Catching up on the week’s Daily Cartoons…

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Keith Knight on not watching the Mets. Mr. Knight began contributing to The New Yorker in December of last year. Visit his website here.

…Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Teresa Burns Parkhurst, on Disney’s re-opening. Ms. Parkhurst began contributing to The New Yorker in October 2017. See her New Yorker work here.

…Monday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Liz Montague on humans and an alien.  Ms. Montague began contributing in March of 2019. Visit her website here.

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Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly Takes You On A Tour of Her Norman Rockwell Museum Exhibit

Here’s a 48 minute video of Liza Donnelly taking you through the just opened exhibit of her work at The Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

Above: a screen grab of Ms. Donnelly standing before her first New Yorker drawing.

Ms. Donnelly’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Liza Donnelly Born, Washington, D.C. New Yorker work: June 21, 1982 – Key book: Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Edited: Sex & Sensibility: Ten Women Examine the Lunacy of Modern Love…in 200 Cartoons ( Twelve, 2008). Co-authored with Michael Maslin: Husbands & Wives ( Ballantine 1995), Call Me When You Reach Nirvana ( Andrew & McMeel, 1995), Cartoon Marriage ( with Michael Maslin) (Random House, 2009), When Do They Serve the Wine?( Chronicle, 2010). Women On Men (Narrative Library, 2013). Donnelly also wrote and illustrated a popular series of dinosaur books for children ( Dinosaur Day, Dinosaur Beach, Dinosaur Halloween, etc.) all published by Scholastic. She is the CBS News Resident Cartoonist. Website: http://www.lizadonnelly.com

 

 

The Weekend Spill: New Addition To The Spill Library; The Tilley Watch Online; Videos (And An App) Of Interest: Liza Donnelly Exhibit At The Norman Rockwell Museum

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New Addition To The Spill Library

Part of the Spill‘s (self charged) charge is to keep in mind all those cartoonists who have been and are part of The New Yorker, not just the names up in lights. Larry Reynolds, having contributed to several of the biggest magazines of his day (including Collier’s, and The Saturday Evening Post) also had three drawings in The New Yorker.  In the July 1st Spill post I showed you a collection of his ongoing character, Butch, who appeared in Collier’s.  Above is the only other example (to my knowledge) of Reynolds’ work in book form. Lines Of Least Resistance, published in 1941 by E.P. Dutton & company, Inc., contains work from all three of the magazines just mentioned as well as drawings from Elks Magazine.  If my count is correct, there are 24 of his drawings in the book, plus the cover and back cover (3 drawings found in the book).

In the drawing shown above you clearly see a Gluyas Williams influence in his work — old man Kelly and two of the other characters — the men — on the right side of the drawing could’ve been in a Gluyas Williams drawing. The fellow in the forefront right, smoking a pipe, and the man running just below the Pelham sign look similar to George Price’s style (especially the way Reynolds drew the running fellow’s legs).  Other drawings seem to carry a heavy influence of a number of other cartoonists. Look at the one below: shades of Syd Hoff and the early work of William Steig (even, a hint of a Helen Hokinson luncheon lady in the frame). I’m led to wonder if Reynolds ever quite settled on a look of his very own.

Larry Reynolds entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Larry Reynolds (Photo from I Feel Like A Cad, 1944; self portrait above right from Colliers Collects Its Wits, Harcourt Brace & Co., 1941) Born, Mt. Vernon, NY, c. 1912.  Died, March 4, 2002, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. New Yorker work: 3 drawings: Jan 7, 1939 / Feb 24, 1940 / April 6, 1940. Collection of Note: I Feel Like A Cad (drawings from Collier’s Weekly).  Link to Allan Holtz’s Reynold’s Stripper’s Guide Profile here.

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An end of week listing of New Yorker artists* who have contributed to newyorker.com features

July 6 -July 10, 2020

The Daily Cartoon: Yasin Osman, Will Santino, Amy Kurzweil, John Cuneo, Patrick McKelvie, J.A.K.

Video: How To Draw A Child by Emma Allen** & Emily Flake

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

*For clarity, the names of artists who have not yet appeared in the print magazine are not bolded.

**Emma Allen is The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Editor

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Videos ( And An App) Of Interest: Liza Donnelly Exhibit At The Norman Rockwell Museum

Here are links to two videos that are part of the Liza Donnelly exhibit at The Norman Rockwell Museum (it opens to the public tomorrow).

This link takes you to a video of Donnelly talking about her live drawing.

And this link takes you to an in depth look at her career.

Also: there’s an app that features Donnelly speaking about individual pieces in the exhibit. See the video about it here.

Personal History: Attended Donnelly’s “virtual art opening” last night, except it wasn’t virtual for me — I was there. Watched as Donnelly (who besides being a colleague, is also my wife) gave a tour, being followed by a cameraman wielding a “live” camera and a photographer documenting the moment (the above photo was not taken by the photographer — it was taken by me with my flip-phone camera as the cartoonist spoke about her sketchbooks in the display case).

For me, the most touching piece on display is also, I believe, the most modest in scale — it may be the smallest piece in the exhibit. It’s the drawing that leaped Ms. Donnelly into The New Yorker;   the first drawing of hers bought, but not the first run. Though OKed (bought) in 1979, it did not run until the issue of November 22, 1982. I believe she speaks about it in the longer video I’ve linked to above.

Go see the exhibit, non-virtually, if you’re up that way. It’s a real treat.

 

 

 

 

Liza Donnelly’s Norman Rockwell Museum Virtual Opening Tonight!

                  “A Master Class In Using Humor”

                                                              — The Boston Globe, July 9, 2020

Here’s the notice from the Globe:

LIZA DONNELLY: COMIC RELIEF (NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM): Donnelly, a cartoonist and children’s book author, has been making wry, powerful cartoons for the New Yorker for more than 30 years. Don’t let the show’s name fool you: Charged with political awareness from feminism to Black Lives Matter, Donnelly’s career is a master class in using humor to heighten and amplify a dead-serious point of view.

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Here’re a few photos from Ms. Donnelly’s exhibit opening this Sunday. There’ll be a live virtual tour at 5:30 by the artist this evening on the Norman Rockwell Museum YouTube channel.

 

 

Must See! An Exhibit Of Liza Donnelly’s Work At The Norman Rockwell Museum

 

Above: the original drawing of a Donnelly cartoon in the The New Yorker issue of April 20, 2020

Liza Donnelly, whose first New Yorker cartoon appeared in the magazine in 1982, will have her first-ever solo exhibit this month at The Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. There’ll be a virtual opening, via the museum’s Youtube channel on Friday the 10th at 5:30 when Ms. Donnelly will give viewers a live tour of her work and answer questions. The museum will open to the public on Sunday, July 12th. Visit the museum’s website here for more information and an overview of the Donnelly exhibit.

Here’s Ms. Donnelly’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Liza Donnelly (pictured above) Born, Washington, D.C. New Yorker work: June 21, 1982 – Key book: Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Edited: Sex & Sensibility: Ten Women Examine the Lunacy of Modern Love…in 200 Cartoons ( Twelve, 2008). Co-authored with Michael Maslin: Husbands & Wives ( Ballantine 1995), Call Me When You Reach Nirvana ( Andrew & McMeel, 1995), Cartoon Marriage ( with Michael Maslin) (Random House, 2009), When Do They Serve the Wine?( Chronicle, 2010). Women On Men (Narrative Library, 2013). Donnelly also wrote and illustrated a popular series of dinosaur books for children ( Dinosaur Day, Dinosaur Beach, Dinosaur Halloween, etc.) all published by Scholastic. Website: http://www.lizadonnelly.com

Fave Photo Of The Day: Liza Donnelly Drawing At The Norman Rockwell Museum; A Case For Pencils Spotlights Teresa Burns Parkhurst; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Liza Donnelly, whose work has been appearing in The New Yorker since 1982, was at The Norman Rockwell Museum yesterday morning  painting a mural in preparation for her exhibit there in mid-July. This will be Ms. Donnelly’s first-ever solo show of her work.

There will be a virtual opening event on July 10th at 5:30 at the museum. Ms. Donnelly will show you around the exhibit and answer questions.  Details will be on the Spill as we get closer to the date.

To see a short video of Ms. Donnelly working on the wall, go here to Instagram.

Link here to Donnelly’s website.

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A Case For Pencils Spotlights Teresa Burns Parkhurst

From Jane Mattimoe’s fab blog, this post on Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

Shown: Ms. Parkhurst’s work place (cropped).

To see all of the cartoonists that’ve been spotlighted on Case, go here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper on a distant polling place.

Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in March of 2016.

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Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman): “Dating Material: ‘That Guy’ Dissected”

Ms. de Recat has contributed to The New Yorker since February of 2018.