Out Today! Liana Finck’s Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, And Notes To Self

In a relatively short period of time Liana Finck has done something that just a few New Yorker cartoonists have managed: working successfully in two distinct styles; in Ms. Finck’s case, one in The New Yorker and the other on Instagram. I think back to John Held, Jr. as a previous example. His New Yorker  woodcut work was in a different universe than the work that brought him fame: delicate flowing lines capturing the roaring twenties crowd.  Ms. Finck’s styles aren’t as far apart as Mr. Held’s, but they are easily IDed as her Instagram work and her New Yorker work. Most of the drawings included in Excuse Me, out today, focuses on Ms. Finck’s Instagram work (the New Yorker drawings included here appeared on the magazine’s Instagram account).

These are highly personal drawings — “complaints, and notes to self” — transmitted to her readers via lists, charts, diagrams, serial drawings telling a story, or a single drawing telling a story (i.e., a New Yorker  cartoon moment). Like the very best of New Yorker artists, Ms. Finck’s work seems to be of her, not just by her. Think of Steinberg, Ziegler, and most especially, Roz Chast. In the Publisher’s Weekly blurb accompanying my copy of Excuse Me  the reviewer refers to “Finck’s brick of a gag collection…” One thing this collection is not is a collection of gag cartoons (oh how I dislike that term). Do not expect the classic arrangement of a drawing hovering over a caption as you see in The New Yorker. My hope is that there’s a Finck collection of her New Yorker drawings in the wings that’ll bookend Excuse Me.

Part of the delight of Ms. Finck’s Instagram drawings is that they are of-the-moment. Just about every cartoonist I know works like this, laying down rough work of words and sketched impressions that may or may not go anywhere. But few post them on Instagram within seconds of completion. The New Yorker cartoonist Liza Donnelly, for instance, has developed a bustling cottage industry over the years out of her “live-drawings” posted immediately online.

The above mentioned PW blurb says this is a brick of a book. Correcto! It’s four hundred pages, 6″ x 8″ — the perfect size to carry around and delve into whenever you need Ms. Finck’s genuinely absorbing graphic company.

The Weekend Spill: Liana Finck At The Strand; Illustrated Narrative Of Interest: Marcellus Hall; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of September 16-20, 2019

Reminder: Liana Finck At The Strand Monday

Liana Finck’s book tour for her just-about-to-be-released Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints and Notes to Self  begins tomorrow at NYC’s legendary Strand bookstore. All the info here.

Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013. Visit her website here.

And…

From Attempted Bloggery Ms. Finck’s promotional postcards tied-in to the purchase of Excuse Me

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Illustrated Narrative Of Interest: Marcellus Hall

Here’s a really terrific illustrated piece in The Guardian by New Yorker cover artist Marcellus Hall.  See it here.

You can also see Mr. Hall’s spot work in the current issue of The New Yorker (September 23, 2019).

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The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of September 16-20, 2019

A listing of New Yorker cartoonists who contributed this past week to the Daily Cartoon or Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Avi Steinberg, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Maddie Dai, Robert Leighton, and  J.A.K.

Daily Shouts: Liana Finck

Mick Stevens’ “Instathing”; Profile Of Interest: Liz Montague; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts…By Liana Finck

Mick Stevens’ “Instathing”

The long-time New Yorker contributor Mick Stevens (his cartoons began appearing there in December of 1979) has recently posted a goodly number of his drawings on Instagram under @secretlivesofthings In an email to The Spill, Mr. Steven’s called it an “Instathing” which I think is awfully catchy.

Here’s how Mr. Stevens introduces the work you’ll see:

Here’s Mr. Stevens’ entry on the A-Z:

Mick Stevens Born March 11, 1942, Portland, Oregon. New Yorker work: December 17, 1979- . Key collections: If Ducks Carried Guns (Fireside/Simon & Schuster, 1988), A Mystery, Wrapped in an Enigma, Served on a Bed of Lettuce ( Fireside/Simon & Schuster, 1989 ), Things Not to Do Today ( Fireside/Simon & Schuster, 1989 ). Website: http://www.mickstevens.com

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Profile Of Interest: Liz Montague

From Washington City Paper, September 19, 2019, “How Local Cartoonist Elizabeth Montague Creates Accesible, Reflective Art”.

Liz Montague began contributing to The New Yorker in March of this year.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…

…is by Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.   Check it out here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts

“Things I’ve ‘Liked’ For Men” by Liana Finck, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013.

Book Tour Of Interest: Liana Finck; Dick Buchanan On The Roth Brothers: Al Ross, Irving Roir, Ben Roth, And Salo; Daily Cartoonists: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Avi Steinberg; A Daily Shouts By…Ward Sutton

Book Tour Of Interest: Liana Finck

Liana Finck’s latest book, Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, And Notes To Self  is out September 24th (Random House). Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013.  Link here to her website.

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Dick Buchanan On The Roth Brothers: Al Ross, Irving Roir, Ben Roth, and Salo

Here’s a terrif post by Dick Buchanan on the Roth brothers (via Mike Lynch’s blog).

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Daily Cartoonists: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Avi Steinberg  

The Daily News Cycle  by Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

A back to school Daily by Avi Steinberg, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

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A Daily Shouts By…Ward Sutton

“The World’s Greatest Dealmaker” by Ward Sutton, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. Visit his website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 16, 2019

The Cover: Ivan Brunetti returns with a cat person/dog person cover. Read here what he had to say about the cover.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

I spend the wee hours of every Monday morning looking through the latest issue of The New Yorker (it’s posted online at around 4am). I look at every cartoon at least twice, then I close my laptop and think about the cartoons I just saw. The ones that stick with me — the ones I think about the most, are the ones noted here on The Monday Tilley Watch.  And so it is this week with these four (in no particular order):

Liana Finck’s (p. 40) umbrella drawing grabbed me immediately. It reminded me of an early New Yorker drawing by her published in 2014 (she began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013) titled Snow Falling On Accountants (I liked that one so much it’s now part of the Spill‘s collection of originals). The drawing has a 1970/1980s-era William Stieg-ian quality to it.

Roz Chast’s Wizard of Oz drawing (p. 54). I’m a fan of Ms. Chast’s outdoorsy drawings (like this one for instance).  I associate Oz with spectacular color (the film is black & white til Dorothy lands in Oz and opens up the door of her farmhouse). We’ve all seen enough of Ms. Chast’s terrif color work so that I can (possibly) be forgiven for imagining this drawing colorized.

The lead off drawing in the issue is by Adam Douglas Thompson. I like the simplicity of this cartoon — the way Mr. Thompson’s shown us exactly what we need to see, and no more.  Rats (and mice) have a long New Yorker cartoon history (here’s a favorite Sam Gross drawing from 1999).

David Borchart’s end of summer drawing (p. 39) is quite fab. Mr. Borchart, as he usually does in his work, gives us a world to think about. And, of course, the drawing itself is spectacular (note how the ferry leaves a wake).

Cartoon placement/sizing: All of the cartoons in this issue have been given good breathing room. A few examples: William Haefeli’s (p.31), Sharon Levy’s (p.59), and Lars Kenseth’s (p.22).

Rea Irvin’s Lost Masthead: Gone since the Spring of 2017, but not forgotten here.