The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 4, 2019

The Cover: Vegetation abounds. Here’s what the artist,Tom Gauld had to say about it.

The Cartoonists in the new issue:


The Magazine: Whenever February comes around, I begin thinking about the upcoming anniversary issue of The New Yorker, a favorite child here on this site (Spill visitors might remember this Tilley-centric piece I wrote for newyorker.com a few years back). Seeing Rea Irvin’s classic dandy this year would be such a welcome surprise. Even more of a surprise than, say, coming upon the now-famous Mandy the Mandarin duck in Central Park. It’s been awhile since we’ve seen Irvin’s iconic cover. In fact, the last time was in 2011. So what will next week’s cover be: the dandy or a duck?



The Tilley Watch Online, January 21-25, 2019; Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Drawings…And Interviews Roz Chast; More Arno And Shermund On Attempted Bloggery

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to Daily Shouts this past week were Bishakh Som, Liana Finck, and Ali Fitzgerald.

The week’s Daily Cartoons, if not outright Trumpian, were certainly Trump tinged. The contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Emily Flake and Lars Kenseth; the online-only contributors were Brooke Bourgeois and Ivan Ehlers.

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The CC‘s “Max” and “Simon” have assigned ratings to all the cartoons in the latest issue of The New Yorker (the issue of January 28th — with John Cuneo’s classic Trump wall cover). Read here. A bonus: Part 1 of the CC’s Roz Chast interview.

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More Arno and Shermund on Attempted Bloggery

Attempted Bloggery has posted its second cover comparison, showing us similarly themed magazine covers by Barara Shermund and Peter Arno (the first post also featured Peter Arno and Barbara Shermund art). I’m really hoping this becomes a series. What fun! Read here.

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 21, 2019

An interesting cover this week, reminiscent of Arthur Getz‘s great city landscapes: a dark city view with a small area of bright lights slicing through. That contrast of dark with dramatic light was close to a Getzian specialty (similar scenes were also beautifully painted by a number of other New Yorker artists through the years). If you can, get hold of The Complete Book of Covers From The New Yorker (Knopf, 1989) — you won’t regret it.

For more on the current cover, you can read about the artist, Pascal Campion here.

The Cartoons/Cartoonists:




Some cartoons of note in this issue:

The solid drawing on page 22 of two couples about to cross paths on a suspended narrow rope bridge marks Hartley Lin‘s cartoon debut in the magazine.

As happily the case with Lars Kenseth‘s work, his stone man on page 30 is something outside the norm.

Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell‘s cinematic post-party drawing on page 51 is terrific, as is Olivia de Recat’s Alarmist Clock on page 63.

On page 59, another cartoonist’s New Yorker debut: Karl Stevens.

Mr. Lin and Mr. Stevens are the first new New Yorker cartoonists of 2019, and the 25th and 26th new cartoonists making their debut in the magazine since Emma Allen became the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor in May of 2017.

…before I turn out the lights on this post, let us not forget that Rea Irvin’s beautiful Talk masthead (below) is still in storage. Read all about it here.


The Tilley Watch Online, November 5-9, 2018; Site Of Interest: A New Yorker State Of Mind; Short Interview Of Interest: Art Spiegelman

The emphasis was, of course(!), on the political this week, with at least half of the Daily Cartoons specifically Trump-centered (Farley Katz‘s Amazon drawing referencing hometown baseball and  “Midnight Cowboy” (?) was an exception).  The other contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Ellis Rosen, Kim Warp, Lars Kenseth, Brendan Loper, and Mort Gerberg.

Over on Daily Shouts, Olivia de Recat and Tom Chitty were the contributing New Yorker cartoonists (Ms. de Recat twice).

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Site Of Interest: A New Yorker State Of Mind

The always entertaining and enlightening A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker looks at the issue of October 26, 1929 (with Theodore Haupt’s beautiful cover). Key quote from this post:

Although two months remained in the decade, the New Yorker of the Roaring Twenties effectively ended with this issue, just days before a massive market crash sent the nation spiraling into the Great Depression.

Read here

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Short Interview Of Interest: Art Spiegelman

From the University of Southern California’s Daily Trojan, November 9, 2018, “Art Spiegelman on comic-book stardom and the responsibility of today’s artists”