The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 18, 2020

The Cover: a sign o’ the times graduation piece by Anita Kunz. This is the tenth out the last eleven covers that is coronavirus-related.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

An even dozen cartoons & cartoonists, with a thirteenth, Ed Steed, as this week’s Spot drawing artist. The newbie in the crowd, Oren Bernstein, is the sixth new New Yorker cartoonist of 2020, and the fifty-ninth new addition to the stable since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

Some fleeting thoughts on a few of this week’s drawings:

…The aforementioned newbie’s drawing style looks to be in the school of John O’Brien (although this drawing carries a caption; Mr. O’Brien is one of the masters of the captionless cartoon).

…I was hoping to see a horse in Roz Chast’s ranch drawing, but alas! (I’m a fan of Ms. Chast’s horse drawings).

…two drawings, two very different styles, caught my eye: Mitra Farmand’s cats in bags (p.62)… and Liana Finck’s moonbeam in a jar (p. 40).

…Emily Bernstein’s racoon drawing caption is swell & funny.

…the rhythm of the wording in the boxed title of Maddie Dai’s gameboard drawing (p.37) vaguely echoed (for me) the wording in John Held, Jr.’s New Yorker work (with maybe a dash of Glen Baxter tossed in).

…I like seeing the George Boothian rug in Frank Cotham’s cartoon (p. 44). When I began studying Mr. Booth’s work, I noticed how many of his carpets never quite sat completely flat on the floor. I found this touch of reality (just one of many in Mr. Booth’s work) inspirational. Example (in this May 25, 1998 New Yorker drawing):

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch

The above iconic design by the great Rea Irvin was ditched in the Spring of 2017 in favor a redrawn(!) version. Hopefully, one day, someday, the above will return. Read all about it here.

 

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Cartoonists Offer #Cartoonrelief To Those Hit Hardest By Covid-19; The Tilley Watch Online, March 30 – April 3, 2020; Tom Gauld’s Collection Reviewed

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While checking in on a New Yorker cartoonist Slack group a few days ago I noticed a number of my cartoonist colleagues had begun using their art to help those in need during this pandemic. I asked if one of the organizers would explain in detail what they were up to. So here is my New Yorker cartoonist colleague, Amy Kurzweil to tell you about an incredibly worthy effort, #Cartoonrelief:

#Cartoonrelief was born on the New Yorker Cartoonist Slack channel. Navied Mahdavian posted that he’d just bought some photographs from Italian artists raising money for local hospitals, and wanted to know if we cartoonists were interested in selling prints or drawings for a coronavirus cause. I was just about to do something similar on my instagram; a couple times annually I sell prints and originals and give half the proceeds to charity, and this seemed like a moment to up my charitable game. I chose (and often raise money for) Give Directly because their charitable model makes the most sense to me; they give unconditional, direct cash transfers to people living in extreme poverty; they’re highly rated by charity watch orgs because their model means overhead costs are low and decisions about how to spend money are as local as possible. Usually their efforts are global, but right now they have a fund that sends cash to US families hit hardest by COVID-19. 
Other cartoonists jumped on board, and we each made our own choices about what to offer and for how much, given our various constraints at the moment. Avi Steinberg is offering digital portraits, Navied Mahdavian is offering original cartoon drawings, Brendan Loper is offering original cartoon drawings, digital prints, and pet portraits, Sofia Warren is offering originals portraits and original collaborative cartoons, Kendra Allenby is offering signed prints and one-on-one art consultations, Ivan Ehlers is offering prints and custom digital portraits. Neil Dvorak is offering prints, Tom Chitty is drawing robots on horses. Each of our offerings is set at a different price-point, between $25 and $125; people just have to message us the receipt for their donation. I’m offering drawn portraits for $100 and personalized digital cartoon prints for $50. Most people are going for portraits, usually of a loved one: a child they’re quarantining with, a partner they are or aren’t quarantining with, a coworker they’re missing. Although it’s been a lot of work, it’s felt quite meaningful to enter people’s lives momentarily through the act of drawing the people they love. All the responses have been incredibly validating. Here are a few of the portraits I’ve done so far:
And here are some other offerings:
Original Cartoons from Navied:
A collaborative cartoon from Sofia and a donating contributor:
I’ve noticed people have been making much larger donations than I suggest. For example, someone just sent me a receipt for $1000. I think people who can give, want to give, and they appreciate encouragement and validation for doing so. Together we’ve raised $8,000 +… and counting!
If you’d like to join us: Our efforts are unified under the hashtag #cartoonrelief, and any cartoonists can get involved by offering whatever art they can, for a COVID-19 related charitable cause. We’re encouraging of cartoonists and cartoon supporters to propose their own charity or fund they believe is helping with medical or economic relief right now.
If people have any questions about how to get involved, or want to support our efforts, you can reach out to any of the cartoonists mentioned above on Instagram, or email me directly: amykurz@gmail.com 
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A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features during the week of March 30 – April 3, 2020.
The Daily Cartoon: Peter Kuper, Shannon Wheeler, Jon Adams, Johnny Dinapoli, Kendra Allenby.
Daily Shouts: Liana Finck, Jason Chatfield (with Ginny Hogan), Avi Steinberg.
…Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.
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Tom Gauld’s Cartoon Collection Reviewed
Mr. Gauld is a New Yorker cover artist.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 6, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Cover: A heart-strings reflection of the issue’s Health Issue theme (but it’s tempting to believe we’d see a cover along these lines even if it wasn’t the Health Issue).

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

An umbrella observation from the get-go:  the abundance of color pieces (one by Roz Chast, one by Emily Flake, and one by Liana Finck) in this issue at times kind’ve almost sorta made it feel as if I was paging through a Cartoon Issue. However, unlike the special pieces found in Cartoon Issues of yore, all three of these new pieces are distinctly linked to one subject (can you guess what it might be?).

There are a number of cartoons in this issue that got my attention, beginning with Barbara Smaller’s (p.26) — my favorite Smaller drawing thus far this year. Also eye-catching: Justin Sheen’s castle & moat drawing; Brendan Loper’s getting away from it all cartoon, and Ed Steed’s survivor. All four enjoy a sharply written caption.

A number of drawings (beyond the color pieces mentioned above)  are either directly related to, or can be seen as related to the coronavirus, foremost being Joe Dator’s terrif drawing (p.69), P.C. Vey’s (p.31), and Mr. Loper’s cartoon on page 39. Tom Chitty’s friendly city drawing (p.57), as well as John O’Brien’s drawing (on page 72) could possibly be read as corona-related cartoons. The folks in Mr. O’Brien’s supermarket all seem to be spaced at least six feet apart, but, as with most all of Mr. O’Brien’s drawings, it’s an evergreen.

The remaining four drawings: Sofia Warren’s, Amy Hwang’s, Teresa Burns Parkhurst’s, and an effort from the Bliss/Martin duo, are comic relief unrelated to the health crisis.

Paperwork: the aforementioned Justin Sheen is new to the New Yorker cartoonist fold. He’s the 4th new cartoonist of 2020, and the 57th new cartoonist brought into The New Yorker since Emma Allen was appointed cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Read about Rea Irvin’s mothballed iconic Talk masthead (above) here.

And This:

Just noticed that The New Yorker‘s Facebook New Yorker Cartoons page received a make-over. The new look is shown below — new (old) typography, and a (recycled) Rea Irvin inspired banana peel-inspecting Tilley icon replacing Christoph Niemann’s guy at a table icon. Mr. Niemann’s icon showed up in the Spring of 2017, and replaced an existing icon — a drawing by Jack Ziegler.  It puzzled me at the time (and thereafter) that work by a non-New Yorker cartoonist (Mr. Niemann) was chosen to replace an icon drawn by an iconic New Yorker cartoonist.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Kendra Allenby on the newest normal.

Ms. Allenby began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Avi Steinberg gives us “Things That Used To Be Annoying But Are Now A Comfort” — Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

 

 

 

New Yorker Cartoonists (And Cakes) At The Magazine’s Holiday Party

Here are a few scenes from last night’s merry New Yorker Holiday Party. A happy throng filled a giant room on the 33rd floor of 1 World Trade Center.

All photos courtesy of Liza Donnelly, unless otherwise attributed. My thanks to cartoonists Liza  Donnelly, Joe Dator, Felipe Galindo, and Jason Chatfield for their photos.

Left: New Yorker editor, David Remnick (holding microphone) addresses the crowd. Singers in Santa hats are just behind him.

Party-goers brought food and drink (it was pot-luck), a nice throw-back to what I recall of department holiday parties many decades ago at the magazine’s 2nd address, 25 West 43rd Street.

 

Of the many cakes and cookies present (and presented), here’s one that sported a familiar face ( photo courtesy Joe Dator).

Below: The New Yorker carolers (photo courtesy Jason Chatfield).

Below: l-r, cartoonist Maggie Larson and cover artist, Jenny Kroik.

Below: cartoonist & caroler, Mort Gerberg  (photo courtesy Jason Chatfield).

Below: l-r, cartoonists Joe Dator, Ali Solomon, and Johnny DiNapoli (photo courtesy Joe Dator).

Below: l-r, cartoonists Drew Dernavich, Ellis Rosen, and by the window, Kendra Allenby.

Below: l-r, the aforementioned Ms. Allenby, Jeremy Nguyen, and The New Yorker‘s fabled Stanley Ledbetter.

Below: l-r,  New Yorker editor, David Remnick, and Pam McCarthy, the magazine’s deputy editor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: l-r, cartoonists Felipe Galindo, and Tim Hamilton.

Below: l-r, Joe Dator, Kendra Allenby, and Ben Schwartz (photo courtesy Joe Dator).

Below: cartoonists Marisa Acocella, and Bob Eckstein.

Below: The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen.

Below: cartoonist Pat Byrnes (holding red cup) surveys the food.

Below: cartoonists Robert Sikoryak, and Gabrielle Bell. (photo courtesy Felipe Galindo).

Below: l-r, cartoonist Nick Downes, and the aforementioned Mr. Ledbetter.

Below: l-r, cartoonists Jason Adam Katzenstein, Karen Sneider, Emily Flake, and The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes. (photo courtesy Felipe Galindo).

Below: cartoonists Christopher Weyant, Ms. Acocella, and coming up behind Ms. Acocella, Sam Gross.

Below: cartoonists Ellie Black, and Maggie Larson.

Below: cartoonists Joe Dator and Emily Flake,  Jason Adam Katzenstein in profile behind Ms. Flake, and Drew Dernavich, far right. .

Below: l-r, cover artist & cartoonist, John Cuneo, The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, and cover artist, Peter de Seve (this photo taken in Ms. Mouly’s “planning room” in the art department)

Below: l-r, cartoonists Jeremy Nguyen, Jason Chatfield, and Liza Donnelly

Below: cartoonists David Borchart and Felipe Galindo.

Below: cartoonists Peter Kuper and P.C. Vey

A cake with a message (photo courtesy of Joe Dator).

 

James Stevenson Documentary Film “Lost And Found” Draws New Yorker Cartoonists; The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (Yesterday’s &Today’s); Meet The Artist (1943): James Thurber; New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality

James Stevenson Documentary Film,”Lost And Found” Draws New Yorker Cartoonists

A special screening of “Stevenson Lost And Found,” a wonderful documentary film about the late great New Yorker artist and writer, attracted  a number of cartoonists last week to the Made In New York Media Center.

Here’s the crowd, post-screening, along with the late Mr. Stevenson’s wife, Josie Merck, (who is also one of the film’s executive producers), along with the film’s director and producer, Sally Williams.

Front row, left to right: Mort Gerberg, Sofia Warren, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Jeremy Nguyen, Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Sam Gross, Cerise Zelenetz, Eugenia Viti, Josie Merck, Sally Williams, Liza Donnelly.

Back row, left to right:  Jason Chatfield, Heather Loase, Ellis Rosen, Johnny DiNapoli, Kendra Allenby, Bishakh Som, Tim Hamilton, Nick Downes, Andy Dubbin, Robert Leighton, Michael Maslin

And here’s James Stevenson’e entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time idea man, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson has long been a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He is a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s recent book, published in 2013, The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, is essential.

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The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (Yesterday’s & Today’s)

To bag or not to bag, by Lila Ash. Ms. Ash began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.

Teresa Burns Parkhurst on the work days before Thanksgiving. Ms. Parkhurst began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

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Meet The Cartoonist (1943): James Thurber

Another in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943

Thurber’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Thurber  Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

And for a lot more Thurber, go here.

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New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality

Read all about it here, and see the video! (that’s The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes — who wrote the script for the video — being Heimliched in the background by actress, Madeline Wise.