The American Bystander’s Michael Gerber Wants To Save MAD Magazine; Bob Eckstein’s NY Daily News MAD Op-Ed; MAD Cartoonists Vs. New Yorker Cartoonists; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Gil Roth Interviews Karl Stevens; 5 Questions: Rich Sparks

The American Bystander’s Michael Gerber, Wants To Save MAD Magazine

 Michael Gerber, the man behind the curtain at American Bystander, is proposing to rescue MAD Magazine.  Below: two Tweets from Mr. Gerber sent out yesterday:

 

 The New York Times called  The American Bystander “…an essential read for comedy nerds”.   Anyone who loves comic art and writing will cheer on Mr. Gerber’s effort  to rescue MAD.

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Bob Eckstein’s N.Y. Daily News MAD Op-Ed

New Yorker cartoonist Bob Eckstein weighs in, via a New York Daily News Op-Ed, on MAD Magazine.  Mr. Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in  2007. Visit his website here.

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MAD Cartoonists Vs. New Yorker Cartoonists

Bittersweet.  This on Comic-Con International’s 2019 schedule:

In one corner, the New Yorker magazine, top of the cartoon heap, king of the single-panel, and undisputed peak of the artform. In the other corner, MAD magazine, the magazine most humorists cite as their biggest influence. Which magazine is the better patron saint of cartoonists? Who has funnier cartoons? And, most important, who would win in a fight between Eustace Tilley, the fop from the NY’er, and Alfred E. Neuman, the MAD magazine mascot? Distinguished panelists from both magazines duke it out in a free-for-all discussion. May the funniest one win.

All the info here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

  Chris Weyant’s gives us sunblock on wheels.  Mr Weyant began contributing to The New Yorker  in 1998. Visit his website here.

 

 

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Gil Roth Interviews Karl Stevens 

Gil Roth adds Karl Stevens to his remarkable list of interviewees (including a goodly number of comics and cartoonists).  Mr. Stevens began contributing to The New Yorker this year.

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5 Questions: Rich Sparks

From Esthetic Lens, July 4, 2019, “5 Questions: Cartoonist Rich Sparks”— like it sez.

Mr. Sparks began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.  His book, Love and Other Weird Things is out the last day of the year. Visit his website here.

 

An Early-Release Blitt Cover; The Latest Case For Pencils Spotlights Karl Stevens; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Brendan Loper

An Early-Release Blitt Cover

The New Yorker sometimes gets the itch to early-release a cover (under normal circumstances we usually don’t see the next cover til the wee hours of Monday morn). Here’s the latest example of a cover that just couldn’t wait (it’s by Barry Blitt). Read about it here.

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Case For Pencils Spotlights Karl Stevens

Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog, A Case For Pencils returns with a look at Karl Stevens’s tools of the trade.

See it here!

Mr. Stevens first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker in January of this year.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Brendan Loper on holiday beach couture. Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in  2016.

A New Yorker State Of Mind: James Thurber’s Art Debuts In The New Yorker; Two New Yorker Cartoonists Cover Cold Comfort Farm; Karl Stevens at The Gardner Museum; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Barry Blitt

The must-read blog, A New Yorker State of Mind on the debut of Thurber art in The New Yorker.  Read here.

… And as the subject is Thurber New Yorker firsts, here are others:

Thurber’s New Yorker debut, in the issue of February 26, 1927: two pieces of verse.  The first,  Villanelle Of Horatio Street, Manhattan (19 lines, signed James Grover Thurber); the second, Street Song (10 lines, signed J .G. T.)

Thurber’s first cartoon appeared  in the issue of January 3, 1931, “Take a good look at these fellows, Tony, so you’ll remember ’em next time.” 

Thurber’s first cover: February 29, 1936.

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Covering Cold Comfort Farm: Saxon & Chast

Two New Yorker cartoonists on the cover of the same title: how often does that happen? I’ve never seen it before (if anyone can come up with another duo please forward*).  In this case we see Charles Saxon’s art on the cover of Stella Gibbons Cold Comfort Farm, published in 1964, and on the right, Roz Chast’s cover art in 2006.

*Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery has brought to my attention my own piece concerning three New Yorker artists (Addams, Steig, and Modell) covering Brendan Gill’s Here At The New Yorker.

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Karl Stevens At the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

From artnet.com, February 27, 2019, “Botticelli’s Beauties Meet Contemporary Cartoons at The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum — See Works From the Show Here” — this piece on newbie New Yorker cartoonist Karl Stevens’ work at the above mentioned museum. Mr. Stevens first New Yorker cartoon appeared in the issue of  January 21, 2019.  Link here for more of his work.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon, Trumpish, of course, is by Barry Blitt. Mr. Blitt began contributing to the New Yorker in 1994. Link here to his website.

Fave Photo Of The Day: Lee Lorenz At The Bruce Museum; The Tilley Watch Online: Newyorker.com Daily Cartoons & Shouts, February 17-23, 2019; Liza Donnelly Live-Draws From The Oscars Red Carpet Tomorrow

Courtesy of the Bruce Museum, this photo of the New Yorker‘s former art/cartoon editor, Lee Lorenz taken on a recent visit to the Bruce’s current exhibit, Masterpieces From The Museum Of Cartoon Art.

Here’s Mr. Lorenz’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Lee Lorenz Born 1932, Hackensack, New Jersey. Mr. Lorenz was the art editor of The New Yorker from 1973 to 1993 and its cartoon editor until 1997. During his tenure, a new wave of New Yorker cartoonists began appearing in the magazine — cartoonists who no longer depended on idea men. The group included, among others, Jack Ziegler, Roz Chast, Mick Stevens, Peter Steiner, Liza Donnelly, Leo Cullum, Tom Cheney, Gahan Wilson, Richard Cline, Michael Crawford, Danny Shanahan, Bruce Eric Kaplan, Victoria Roberts, and Arnie Levin.

Cartoon collections: Here It Comes (Bobbs-Merrrill Co., Inc. 1968) ; Now Look What You’ve Done! (Pantheon, 1977) ; The Golden Age of Trash ( Chronicle Books, 1987); The Essential series, all published by Workman: : Booth (pub: 1998), Barsotti ( pub: 1998), Ziegler (pub: 2001), The Art of The New Yorker 1925 -1995, (Knopf, 1995), The World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998). New Yorker work: 1958 –.

Mr. Lorenz’s 1977 cartoon collection

 

 

 

 

A Daily week nearly devoid of politics. The Daily cartoonists: Ellie Black, Karl Stevens, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, and Julia Suits.

The Daily Shouts contributing New Yorker cartoonists: Ali Fitzgerald, Liana Finck, Sophia Warren, Tom Chitty, and Maggie Larson.

You can see all of the above, and more here.

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Donnelly At The Oscars

Four years ago Liza Donnelly made history as the first cartoonist to live-draw from the Oscars Red Carpet. She’s been in LaLa Land this past week drawing events leading up to tomorrow’s big day when she’ll once again live-draw from the Red Carpet. Follow her work on @Lizadonnelly .

Ms. Donnelly’s first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 1982. She is the author of eighteen books, including Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005).