The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker (Double) Issue, July 8 & 15, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist’s Cartoon

The Cover: A hot dog cart guy gets some beach time on Peter De Seve’s cover.  Read the Cover Story here.

The Cartoonists:

The Newbies: Making their New Yorker print debut this week: Victor Varnado and Akeem Roberts. They become the record-setting nineteenth and twentieth new cartoonists entering the magazine’s stable of artists this year and the forty-fifth and forty-sixth new artists brought in under cartoon editor Emma Allen’s stewardship, begun in May of 2017.

The Cartoons: Brief thoughts on some of the thirteen cartoons in the issue:

Roz Chast’s Ordinary Kreskin drawing (p. 37).  Love Ms. Chast’s right-to-the-point drawings, like this one. Perhaps not so unusual, but noticeable: she’s drawn Mr. Kreskin with five fingers (a lot of cartoonists find four will do for their cartoon characters). 

Liana Finck’s talking baby (p. 44).  A terrific twist on an end-of-life sentiment. I found myself wondering if it would’ve been equally successful had the baby been talking to another baby.

Ed Steed’s hammered drawing (p.54).  At first glance on my laptop, before zooming in on the drawing I thought that Mr. Steed had done a mash-up drawing with George Booth. If you squint your eyes, it’s a very Boothian room (the perspective, the hanging ceiling lamp, the floorboards, wall objects). 100% Steedian is the idea itself and the Steedian happily hammering woman.

My confused initial take on seeing the drawing leads me to toss out a suggestion. There’s been plenty written on this site about cartoon collaboration, but those duets have involved a writer teamed with an artist (or two artists collaborating) with just one person doing the drawing.  Howz about for fun we see some artists team-up and create a drawing or two with multiple styles in one frame. Some suggestions: Chast/Finck, Dator/Donnelly,  Hwang/Shanahan, Sipress/Allenby,  Kenseth/Koren…just a thought. (Liza Donnelly and I had a ton ‘o’ fun doing a series of mash-up full-page graphic pieces for our 2009 collection, Cartoon Marriage)  

Paul Noth’s line of succession drawing (p. 58). Mr. Noth delivers a great drawing.  I only wish it had been given more breathing room (such as Mr. Steed’s). 

Robert Leighton’s drawing (p.32) features a caption that would probably be right at home in a positive thinking seminar.  Yet another Leighton drawing destined for many a refrigerator.   

Karen Sneider’s funny fish in bed recalls the classic George Price drawing published in the magazine’s issue of December 21, 1963

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin (with Harold Ross and his then-wife, Jane Grant) was a founder of The New Yorker‘s graphic architecture. Consider his adapted typeface (the so-called Irvin typeface) that is part of the magazine’s DNA, the breadth of cartoon worlds he encouraged as art supervisor, his department heading designs, and his numerous covers (including, of course, the magazine’s brilliant first that gave us Eustace Tilley). Tis a puzzlement that his iconic heading for the Talk Of The Town remains under a tarp. Here it is below, and here’s where you can read about its removal in 2017.

 

____________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist’s Cartoon

Singin’ under the drip from Amy Kurzweil, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit her website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 25, 2019; Even More George Price; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Lila Ash

The Cover:

As mentioned here last week, the Brexit-inspired cover, by Mark Ulriksen, was early-released.  Read about it here.

The Cartoonists:

Suerynn Lee‘s work has appeared on newyorker.com;  this is her print debut in the magazine. Ms. Lee is the fifth cartoonist to debut this year, and the twenty-ninth cartoonist brought aboard since Emma Allen took the reins of the cartoon department in May of 2017.

The Cartoons:

A quick tour through the issue and we find Roz Chast’s take on the tale of the Little Red Hen, Lars Kenseth’s commemorative pizza plate, Sophia Warren’s office politics mouse maze, Tom Chitty’s genie who specializes in just one thing, P.C. Vey’s couple’s abrupt waking in the night,  a Will McPhail long-lasting roller coaster, Karen Sneider’s desert island delirium, Frank Cotham’s concerned waiter, BEK’s second-guessing God, Victoria Robert’s juggling husband, Harley Lin’s lawyer, client and rubber band ball… and the aforementioned Ms. Lee, with a drawing of Death and the five second rule. Ms. Robert’s and Mr. Chitty’s drawings are given the most breathing room.

Twelve cartoons; Twenty-one illustrations — approximately five-and-a-half of them are full page. 

_____________________________

Rea Irvin’s Talk masthead masterpiece is still in mothballs. Here’s some reading material about it, and below is what it looks like.

____________________

Even More George Price

Attempted Bloggery continues its Price Fest, with close-up looks at the artist’s originals. See it here!

I’ve always found Price’s split lines intriguing. Sorry I never had the opportunity to ask him about his style.  I only was in the same room (an office) with him once, ages ago — unfortunately it wasn’t the time or place to start asking questions.

____________________

Today’s Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Today’s Daily cartoon, regarding twenty somethings, is by Lila Ash.  Ms. Ash began contributing  to The New Yorker in December of 2018. Link here to her website.

 

 

 

 

New Yorker Cartoonists Holiday Party

Decades ago, in the William Shawn era, New Yorker cartoonists celebrated the holidays in-house (specifically, in-department).  They’d show up at the office and drink punch provided by the art editor Lee Lorenz and his assistant, Anne Hall. Cartoonists would sample rum balls brought in by their colleague, Henry Martin.  During the Tina Brown years the holiday party went big time, when all departments went out-of-office and co-mingled in (mostly) downtown establishments.  Coming full circle this year’s party for cartoonists came back home to the offices (yay!).  Last night’s shindig was hosted by the cartoon editor, Emma Allen, and the assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes (and, shades of Henry Martin, cartoonist David Borchart even brought in some homemade cookies).

Ink Spill‘s official photographer for the evening, cartoonist Liza Donnelly attended the festivities, and captured the scene. 

Below, left to right: Kendra Allenby, Ali Soloman, Farley Katz and Emma Allen.

Below: in the foreground, Robert Leighton (on the left) speaks with Ed Steed. In the back, left-to-right, with his back to the camera is Colin Stokes, Avi Steinberg (in the hat), and a partially obscured Ellis Rosen. Between Mr. Steinberg and Mr. Ellis is the fabulous Peter Arno New Yorker cover of June 5, 1954.

Below: a frieze of cartoonists. Will mention just a few: to the far left is Emma Hunsinger. To the far right, second in, is PC. Vey.

 

Below: Mort Gerberg (on the left) and George Booth.

Below, left-to-right: Avi Steinberg, Karen Sneider, Jason Adam Katzenstein, and, with her back to the camera, Gabrielle Bell.

Below: foreground, looking at the camera is Sophia Warren, then Robert Leighton, and (with eyepatch) Mort Gerberg. In the background: far left, is Ed Steed, then (with back to camera) David Sipress, Joe Dator (with scarf), and Kendra Allenby.

Below: on the far left is Joe Dator, and then Emily Flake and Marisa Acocella.

 

Below: a waving Jeremy Nguyen and Maggie Larson. Far left, in the back is Brendan Loper.

Below, left to right:  George Booth, Liza Donnelly, and David Borchart (this photo courtesy of  Mr. Borchart).

Below: Felipe Galindo and Drew Dernavich.

.

Below: The New Yorker‘s Jack-of-All Trades,Stanley Ledbetter, Johnny DiNapoli, Farley Katz, and Ellis Rosen.

Below, left to right: David Sipress and Ben Schwartz.

Below: Emma Allen and Farley Katz.

Below: the ever festive Rea Irvin type-faced logo!

 

— My thanks to Liza Donnelly, Colin Stokes, Emma Allen, and David Borchart for their assistance  with this post.

 

 

New New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt.2: Edward Steed

And here’s part two of Ink Spill‘s look at some of the newest New Yorker cartoon contributors. If you saw the piece about Liana Finck the other day you’ll remember I’ve asked a trio of fresh faces to tell us a little about themselves and how it was they ended up at The New Yorker. Today we hear from  Edward Steed, who hails from England (joining a stellar cast of our colleagues from across the Atlantic, including Alfred Leete*, who was in the very first issue of The New Yorker).

Mr. Steed’s first New Yorker appearance was in the issue dated March 4, 2013 (an example of his work is below. The cartoon appeared in The New Yorker September 16, 2013).  Mr. Steed has graciously provided Ink Spill with a self portrait.

The floor is now all his:

inkspill-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I discovered New Yorker cartoons recently, just a couple of years ago. I saw them online and decided I would like to do that too. I hadn’t been interested in cartoons since I’d outgrown the stuff I looked at when I was young, but these were clearly different. I started writing down ideas straightaway.

When I had a bunch of what I thought were good ones I sent them in. Didn’t know about the Tuesday deadline or how the system worked, I just kept sending as many as I could come up with. I hadn’t really drawn cartoons since I was a child. I had no style. So I hoped to impress with quantity. I did that for a few months and heard nothing. Eventually, Bob Mankoff phoned and said he wanted to buy a few of them.

After that, I quit my job and went to New York (I’m from England). I bought the New Yorker magazine for the first time at the airport and read it on the plane, I liked it.
Went to the Tuesday meeting and met Bob and some of the other cartoonists. Everyone was great, very kind and welcoming. Karen Sneider took me to an art shop and explained what kinds of pens cartoonists are supposed to use. Sam Gross showed me round the cartoon section of the Strand bookshop.

& I’ve been drawing cartoons for the magazine fairly regularly since then.

Lead into gold cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And…

See Edward Steed’s New Yorker work here on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.

*Additional reading: here’s Alfred Leete‘s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

 

Alfred Leete  (photo above)  Born at Thorpe Church, Northamptonshire, England,  August 28, 1882; Died in London,  June 17, 1933. The son of a farmer, Leete had no formal art training. According to his obit in The Times of London, June 6. 1933: “…his work early showed a keen sense of humour and a bold technique, and was welcomed by the principal illustrated weekly papers and magazines.”    NYer work: appeared in the very first issue of The New Yorker, February 21, 1925. Mr. Leete is uncredited in The New Yorker’s database (listed only as “unidentified”).  As of February 27, 2013, he’s been identified (with the assistance of colleagues, Rick Marschall, Mike Lynch  and Brian Moore). A website bio

 

New Yorker Cartoonists Turn Out for Holiday Party

 

 New Yorker cartoonists turned out in time honored fashion to celebrate the holidays last night.  Corey Pandolph gets a heap of credit for procuring a corner of the Upper East Side Hi Life Restaurant where nearly two dozen contributors came together in good cheer.  Among those attending, including Mr. Pandolph: Joe Dator, David Borchardt, Liam Walsh (who brought and shared a tray of cookies), Andy Friedman, Liza Donnelly, Robert Leighton, Bob Esmay, Emily Flake, Drew Dernavich, Farley Katz, John O’Brien, Avi Steinberg (celebrating his first appearance in the magazine), Barbara Smaller, Felipe Galindo, David Sipress, Bob Eckstein, Eric Lewis, Ward Sutton, Christopher Weyant, Ben Schwartz, and Karen Sneider.

Liza Donnelly has posted on her blog  a handful of photographs taken at the event.