The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 11, 2019

The Cover: Bruce McCall returns with a cut-away cover. I can’t think of a New Yorker cut-away drawing without thinking of this Charles Addams classic from April 28, 1951 (found on the left, mid-way down the link page). 

The Cartoonists:

Some random thoughts on some of the cartoons in this week’s issue:

…as a P.S. Mueller fan, and as someone who loves cowboy drawings, it was a blast coming upon his drawing on page 75….

…there are two cartoons in the issue as a result of team work: one by Kamraan Haffeez and Al Batt, the other by Corey Pandolf and Craig Baldo…

… work appears by two of the three New Yorker cartoonists who’ve been published in The New Yorker longer than any of the other active contributors*: Edward Koren and George Booth. Edward Koren’s first New Yorker cartoon was published May 26, 1962. Mr. Booth’s first New Yorker drawing was published in the issue of June 14, 1969. *Mort Gerberg is second — his first drawing appeared in April of 1965. It should be noted that Sam Gross is hot on Mr. Booth’s heels — his first New Yorker drawing appeared August 23, 1969, two months after Mr. Booth’s first.

…the way Karen Sneider drew the two characters in her fun cartoon (p.80) vaguely reminds me of Chon Day’s work. Mr. Day’s style seemed to me a way more organized and orderly version of Thurber’s. Mr. Day did wonders with a simple line, and an occasional layer of faint wash.

…really like the pay-off of Amy Hwang’s caption in her drawing (on page 61).

…congrats to all the runners in yesterday’s NYC Marathon, including our very own Liza Donnelly    who ran the big race for the very first time (her “Was Married” drawing appears on page 78).

The Rea Irvin Missing (and Missed) Talk Masthead Watch

The above jewel has been missing from The New Yorker since the Spring of 2017. Read about it here.

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Peter Kuper’s NYT’s Book Review Back Page; The Tilley Watch Online, October 28 – November 1, 2019; Karasik Speaks; A Mary Petty Exhibit In Maryland

Peter Kuper’s New York Times Book Review  “Graphic Review”

Be sure to check out Peter Kuper’s “Graphic Review” (featured in tomorrow’s New York Times Book Review). His new book, Heart Of Darkness is out November 5th. He’ll be appearing to sign and speak about the book twice in New York next week (see yesterday’s Spill for links to venues).

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The Tilley Watch Online, October 28 – November 1, 2019: an end of the week listing of New Yorker artists that contributed online to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Ali Solomon, Karen Sneider, Johnny DiNapoli, Barbara Smaller, Kim Warp, Ellis Rosen.

Daily Shouts: Sara Lautman, Ellis Rosen & Colin Stokes, Ali Fitzgerald.

and…the stand alone feature,  Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

Go here to see all of the above and more (including Lynda Barry’s Daily Shouts piece, “Making Comics: The Face-Jam Excercise”), 

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Karasik Speaks

See the poster for all the info, and/or go here. Mr. Karasik began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

His most recent book, co-authored with Mark Newgarden, was How to Read Nancy: The Elements Of Comics In Three Easy Panels, published by Fantagraphics  in 2017.

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A Mary Petty Exhibit In Maryland

A Mary Petty exhibit is about to open at St. John’s Mitchell Gallery.  All the info here.

Ms. Petty’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Mary Petty Born, Hampton, New Jersey, April 29, 1899. Died, Paramus, New Jersey, March, 1976. New Yorker work: October 22, 1927 – March 19, 1966. Collection: This Petty Place ( Knopf, 1945) with a Preface by James Thurber.

 

 

Boo!

Happy Halloween!

Here’s a rejected cover submitted to The New Yorker ages and ages ago (sometime in the 1980s) and brought out here on previous Halloweens (what can I say? I like cupcakes). While this one wasn’t green-lighted, another of my Halloween covers was accepted (by then New Yorker editor, Robert Gottlieb, with Lee Lorenz as art editor). Unfortunately that one was a casualty of Tina Brown’s hiring (she “killed” it, along with droves of other bought material by an assortment of the magazine’s artists).

Anyway, it’s always fun to connect Halloween with baked goods. Heck, it’s fun to connect baked goods with any day of the year.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Karen Sneider witches brew. Ms. Sneider began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009.

 

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Addams On Halloween

Can’t not mention Charles Addams on this spooky day. It’s a lot of fun having so much Addams in the news lately due to the just released Addams Family animated film. But even without the film, The Addams Family remains a fixture in our culture.  As a student of New Yorker cartoons I never tire of sitting down and looking through any one of his anthologies. The care he put into his work is inspirational.  Each cartoon seems a gem, perfectly (and I’d guess lovingly) constructed. Addams was never my cartoon guru (Thurber is), but I learned more than I’ll ever know from his work.

 

For more on Addams, read Linda Davis’s biography, and go to the Tee & Charles Addams Foundation website.

Above: Chas Addams Monster Rally was published in 1950 by Simon & Schuster

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker (Double) Issue, July 8 & 15, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist’s Cartoon

The Cover: A hot dog cart guy gets some beach time on Peter De Seve’s cover.  Read the Cover Story here.

The Cartoonists:

The Newbies: Making their New Yorker print debut this week: Victor Varnado and Akeem Roberts. They become the record-setting nineteenth and twentieth new cartoonists entering the magazine’s stable of artists this year and the forty-fifth and forty-sixth new artists brought in under cartoon editor Emma Allen’s stewardship, begun in May of 2017.

The Cartoons: Brief thoughts on some of the thirteen cartoons in the issue:

Roz Chast’s Ordinary Kreskin drawing (p. 37).  Love Ms. Chast’s right-to-the-point drawings, like this one. Perhaps not so unusual, but noticeable: she’s drawn Mr. Kreskin with five fingers (a lot of cartoonists find four will do for their cartoon characters). 

Liana Finck’s talking baby (p. 44).  A terrific twist on an end-of-life sentiment. I found myself wondering if it would’ve been equally successful had the baby been talking to another baby.

Ed Steed’s hammered drawing (p.54).  At first glance on my laptop, before zooming in on the drawing I thought that Mr. Steed had done a mash-up drawing with George Booth. If you squint your eyes, it’s a very Boothian room (the perspective, the hanging ceiling lamp, the floorboards, wall objects). 100% Steedian is the idea itself and the Steedian happily hammering woman.

My confused initial take on seeing the drawing leads me to toss out a suggestion. There’s been plenty written on this site about cartoon collaboration, but those duets have involved a writer teamed with an artist (or two artists collaborating) with just one person doing the drawing.  Howz about for fun we see some artists team-up and create a drawing or two with multiple styles in one frame. Some suggestions: Chast/Finck, Dator/Donnelly,  Hwang/Shanahan, Sipress/Allenby,  Kenseth/Koren…just a thought. (Liza Donnelly and I had a ton ‘o’ fun doing a series of mash-up full-page graphic pieces for our 2009 collection, Cartoon Marriage)  

Paul Noth’s line of succession drawing (p. 58). Mr. Noth delivers a great drawing.  I only wish it had been given more breathing room (such as Mr. Steed’s). 

Robert Leighton’s drawing (p.32) features a caption that would probably be right at home in a positive thinking seminar.  Yet another Leighton drawing destined for many a refrigerator.   

Karen Sneider’s funny fish in bed recalls the classic George Price drawing published in the magazine’s issue of December 21, 1963

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin (with Harold Ross and his then-wife, Jane Grant) was a founder of The New Yorker‘s graphic architecture. Consider his adapted typeface (the so-called Irvin typeface) that is part of the magazine’s DNA, the breadth of cartoon worlds he encouraged as art supervisor, his department heading designs, and his numerous covers (including, of course, the magazine’s brilliant first that gave us Eustace Tilley). Tis a puzzlement that his iconic heading for the Talk Of The Town remains under a tarp. Here it is below, and here’s where you can read about its removal in 2017.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist’s Cartoon

Singin’ under the drip from Amy Kurzweil, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit her website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 25, 2019; Even More George Price; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Lila Ash

The Cover:

As mentioned here last week, the Brexit-inspired cover, by Mark Ulriksen, was early-released.  Read about it here.

The Cartoonists:

Suerynn Lee‘s work has appeared on newyorker.com;  this is her print debut in the magazine. Ms. Lee is the fifth cartoonist to debut this year, and the twenty-ninth cartoonist brought aboard since Emma Allen took the reins of the cartoon department in May of 2017.

The Cartoons:

A quick tour through the issue and we find Roz Chast’s take on the tale of the Little Red Hen, Lars Kenseth’s commemorative pizza plate, Sophia Warren’s office politics mouse maze, Tom Chitty’s genie who specializes in just one thing, P.C. Vey’s couple’s abrupt waking in the night,  a Will McPhail long-lasting roller coaster, Karen Sneider’s desert island delirium, Frank Cotham’s concerned waiter, BEK’s second-guessing God, Victoria Robert’s juggling husband, Harley Lin’s lawyer, client and rubber band ball… and the aforementioned Ms. Lee, with a drawing of Death and the five second rule. Ms. Robert’s and Mr. Chitty’s drawings are given the most breathing room.

Twelve cartoons; Twenty-one illustrations — approximately five-and-a-half of them are full page. 

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Rea Irvin’s Talk masthead masterpiece is still in mothballs. Here’s some reading material about it, and below is what it looks like.

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Even More George Price

Attempted Bloggery continues its Price Fest, with close-up looks at the artist’s originals. See it here!

I’ve always found Price’s split lines intriguing. Sorry I never had the opportunity to ask him about his style.  I only was in the same room (an office) with him once, ages ago — unfortunately it wasn’t the time or place to start asking questions.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Today’s Daily cartoon, regarding twenty somethings, is by Lila Ash.  Ms. Ash began contributing  to The New Yorker in December of 2018. Link here to her website.