The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 17, 2018

The cover

If you haven’t already seen the school busses on the road, or the signs posted everywhere advising that school is back in session, Chris Ware’s cover is yet another reminder that it’s back to school time.

The cartoons

Here, for the record, are the contributing cartoonists in the issue:

A quick survey of each drawing: Ms. Suits gives us a cactus drawing (are cactus the new crash test dummies — this being the second cactus drawing out of the past three issues); Mr. Dernavich provides us with an end of summer roller coaster drawing with some unintentional(?) graphic trickery concerning the track itself; Ms. McNair’s couple have neighborly dinner date issues; Farley Katz takes us to a sturdy cartoon scenario of parent reading to a child at bedtime; William Haefeli up next with his trademark drawing style and an excellent caption; an Edward Koren drawing — allowed a wonderful space on the page. Very nice all around!; Ben Schwartz plays with Rodin’s The Thinker; Ed Steed plays around with a clown and a banana peel (and it’s in color); Zach Kanin visits a game of spin the bottle (a scenario we rarely see); Frank Cotham allows us a peek into a room full of sweaty frock-coated gentlemen; Sara Lautman takes us up up and away to the sky god’s territory; Joe Dator’s drawing of a symphony hall is splendid; Kim Warp’s trash-in-the-sea drawing arrives with trash-in-the sea much in the news.  And finally, a nod to the advent of Fall baseball with a meeting at the pitcher’s mound courtesy of Tom Toro.

The issue arrives sans Rea Irvin’s classic masthead. Here it is:

I can’t let mid-September slip by without mentioning the issue of September 11, 1925 (cover by the aforementioned Mr. Irvin).  

New Yorker history buffs will recall that the magazine was nearly put to rest in the Spring of its first year of publication. If not for an overheard remark, the New Yorker would’ve been a magazine that lasted less than half a year. Instead of killing the magazine, it was decided to coast through the summer,  putting renewed energy into the issue of September 12th. You can read about the specifics on content here courtesy of A New Yorker State of Mind.

 

 

Fave Photo of the Day: Cartoonists Celebrate Sam Gross’s Birthday; Early Release: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; Cartoon Companion Dissects the Very Latest New Yorker Cartoons

Fave Photo of the Day: Cartoonists Celebrate Sam Gross’s Birthday

Cartoonists gathered on Manhattan’s upper east side on Thursday to celebrate Cartoon God, Sam Gross, who turned 85 on August 7th.  Clockwise from the lower left: Robert Leighton, Bob Eckstein, Maria Scrivan, Nick Downes, Marisa Acocella, Sam Gross, Roz Chast, and Tracey Berglund. 

–photo courtesy of Bob Eckstein

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Early Release: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover

Read what Kadir Nelson, the cover artist for next week’s issue, had to say about his Aretha Franklin tribute.

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Cartoon Companion Dissects the Very Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC boys are back with their ratings for this week’s cartoons (the issue of August 20th).  Julia Suits was awarded the CC‘s Top Toon ribbon. Read it all here!

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of June 18, 2018

Ah, a Father’s Day cover.

 I find this cover puzzling. The sink is dripping, yet the repair work seems to be going on under the sink.  My understanding is that a dripping faucet is repaired within the faucet itself — it’s usually just a gasket replacement. Work below the sink is reserved for clogged, damaged or leaking pipes or water lines.  As the father and daughter shown on the cover are working under the sink you might assume they are doing something along those lines — something involving the pipes or water lines.  Yet anyone working below the sink would not begin working below the sink until first turning off both the hot and cold water (which only involves reaching in under the sink and closing the water valves). Thus they would not be set to work, such as they are, below the counter with the water still running. I know, I know, lighten up, Ink Spill — it’s not an illustration from a manual describing how to fix a dripping faucet.  As a cartoonist who has only worked on dripping faucets and leaking pipes in a non-professional capacity, I admit I could be completely wrong about all of the above.

From the Department of Just Sayin’:

# of illustrations in this issue: 20 (including photographs, but not including Tom Bachtell’s wonderful drawings that appear regularly in The Talk of The Town).  5 of the illustrations are full page.

# of cartoons  in the issue: 14 (none are full page).

As in previous weeks, I’m not going to go cartoon-by-cartoon, but will instead note a few.

Interesting that for two of the cartoons the humor involves walking through or onto something.  That is to say, the act of walking itself is the core of the drawing.  In Julia Suits cartoon (p.16), a  blindfolded fellow is being led to step onto an upturned rake. Ka-pow, right?  In Will McPhail’s drawing (p.39), a just arriving visiting couple will momentarily walk through hot coals. Ouch!

  The New Yorker cartoon subway series is back after a hiatus; this week’s subterranean drawing courtesy of Roz Chast (page 34). 

 The Spill does not rate cartoons like they do over on the Cartoon Companion, but it does applaud exceptional work, such as Joe Dator’s drawing (p.21) and Bruce Kaplan’s tight graphic treat (p.42).

Finally, as has been the case for just over a year now, I’m showing Rea Irvin’s spectacular Talk of the Town masthead.  Why show it?  Because it was replaced last spring by a look-alike.  To read a Spill piece about Mr. Irvin’s drawing and its unnecessary replacement, link here.

Here’s the real thing:

To see all of the cartoons in this issue, link here and scroll down to the slideshow, “Cartoons from the Issue”

— See you next week

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of April 16, 2018

Tom Gauld’s cover for this new issue is one of the best covers I’ve seen in the post-Lee Lorenz as editor era (Mr. Lorenz was the New Yorker‘s art editor from 1973 through 1993, and cartoon editor from 1993 through 1997. During his years as art editor he edited both covers and cartoons). Here’s Mr. Gauld talking about his Spring offering. 

Ink Spill puts its hands together for the cover.

My first run through of the issue earlier today made me wonder if this was the Illustration Issue (there isn’t an official Illustration Issue, but if there was, this could be it).  Here’s what I saw:

Goings On About Town, is as usual nearly a full page photograph.

A small color illustration in the Theater section.

A nearly half-page illustration for Night Life.

A three column wide photograph for Food & Drink.

A more than quarter-page photograph for Personal History.

A two column wide illustration for Shouts & Murmurs.

A nearly half-page photograph for The Sporting Scene.

A full page illustration for Profiles.

A page-and-a-half illustration for The World of Fashion.

A full page photograph for Fiction.

A three-quarter page illustration for The Theater.

An large illustration center of the page for Vinson Cunningham’s review in Books.

A more than quarter-page illustration for James Woods review in Books.

A center of the page illustration for Cinema.

And now to the cartoons:

The very first cartoon is by the veteran Mick Stevens. It’s an inside a whale cartoon. I immediately paused to consider the bend in the gullet of the whale. Having never been inside a whale I don’t know what it looks like in there but the cartoonist in me has always thought the inside of a whale was one huge space, like an airplane hanger. So yes, the bend caused me to stop and think awhile.

Up next five pages later is a super-dee-duper detailed William Haefeli drawing. Its graphic-ness (I don’t think that’s really a word) is startling. Perhaps it’s the use of so much black space (windows especially).  

Five pages later a Paul Noth drawing (Mr. Noth has a new book out, so congrats to him). This is an airlines passengers themed cartoon. As someone who has almost never flown I’m outta the loop on the whole boarding routine, so…

Two pages later a Seth Fleishman captionless drawing (as mentioned in previous posts here, Mr. Fleishman is solidly in the captionless cartoon school — which isn’t to say there are never captions). Here we have brick-oven pizza blended with a fossil fuel. I can’t get enough of pizza parlor cartoons. I’m sure everyone remembers this classic from Gahan Wilson.

Six pages later, a P.C. Vey cartoon. Not sure anyone else could’ve done this (maybe the aforementioned Mr. Wilson). There’s a tiny bit of sinisterism (is that a word?) in the air with this drawing. Seven pages later an outta the box (or boxes) Roz Chast drawing. We’ve become accustomed to her comics-like structure of three panels (or more). This single panel is striking, graphically.

Equally striking on the very next page is a teethy Edward Koren drawing starring one of his famous beasts. Perhaps the best placed drawing in the issue (there are several cartoons vying for worst placed cartoons). Breathing room galore for Mr. Koren’s dental drawing.

Four pages later Kate Curtis three bears cartoon (one bear unseen, as is Goldilocks). The window in the drawing looks out onto a dark forest. My gaze kept returning there, expecting to see something. But no…

Three pages later an ashes in an urn drawing from David Sipress. Comedic use of ashes in urns summons up (for me) this scene from Meet the Parents Mr. Sipress makes use of Milton Glaser’s I heart NY campaign, introduced in 1977. 

Two pages later a Ben Schwartz scientists observing behavior cartoon. The cartoon rests on the hope that the reader has some familiarity with a particular author mentioned. If you’re not familiar with the author then it’s off to Wikipedia for a crash course.

Four pages later, Julia Suits has a toga drawing featuring some lovely draping. On the very next page Trevor Spaulding has a cartoon related to a recent cultural movement.  Interesting drawing.

Three pages later a somewhat complex drawing from Lars Kenseth combining fringe mob activity with fine art (see Mickey Blue Eyes for more on this). 

Seven pages later, the last drawing in the issue (not counting those that are part of the caption contest): a Carolita Johnson cartoon in a slim space on the bottom of page 72. The drawing is about lip balm which strangely(?) reminds me of an interview I saw the other day with Joseph Kennedy III wherein he discusses “Chapstick-gate.” 

And that’s that, except for this *

*Rea Irvin’s classic Talk of the Town masthead design has been missing for nearly a year now. Just as a reminder, it looks exactly like this:

 

 

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; More Spills: A Charles E. Martin (CEM) Comic Strip, An Exhibit Down South

Gee whiz, it seems like the Olympics happened months ago, but last Monday’s Daily Cartoon by Pia Guerra reminds us that the torch was extinguished just a week ago. After the torch cartoon it seemed* to be all politics on the Daily, with work by Ellis Rosen, Julia Suits, Brendan Loper, and Peter Kuper.

*Ms. Suits’ drawing might be construed as political, but then again, it might not be.

Over on Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Julia Wertz, Barbara Smaller, Christian Lowe, and special guest, Colin Stokes (Mr. Stokes is the New Yorker‘s Assistant Cartoon Editor and a co-author of at least one published New Yorker cartoon).

All of the work mentioned above, and more, can be found here.

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…From The Stripper’s Guide, February 28, 2018, “Obscurity of the Day: The Scuttles”  —  a look at a single panel comic strip by Charles E. Martin, before he became a regular New Yorker contributor (covers and cartoons).

Mr. Martin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Charles E. Martin ( CEM) (photo left above from Think Small, a cartoon collection produced by Volkswagon. Photo right, courtesy of Roxie Munro; a CEM New Yorker cover, July 18, 1977) Born in Chelsie, Mass., 1910, died June 18, 1995, Portland, Maine. New Yorker work: 1938 – 1987.

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…If you’re down south you might seek out the Matthew Diffee exhibit at the Hickory Museum of Art.  It runs through July 8th.  Info here.