The Weekend Spill: A 1934 July 4th Moment By Steig; Bliss’s American Bystander Cover; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of June 29th-July 3rd, 2020; More Spills: Eckstein’s Beast Piece, A Hoff Mural, and More Henry Martin

William Steig’s 1934 New Yorker cover celebrating the 4th of July  seems to capture the mood of this particular 4th when we have been urged to stay at home, away from gatherings. It was, of course, published during another deeply troubled time in our history.

Here’s William Steig’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

William Steig Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.

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American Bystander‘s Michael Gerber has released the cover of his next issue (#15 for those keeping track). Cover by Harry Bliss. You can order your copy here. If this issue is anything like the previous 14 it’ll be worth the five bucks (Cheap!).

 Harry Bliss began contributing cartoons and covers to The New Yorker  in January of 1998.  A Wealth Of Pigeon: A Cartoon Collection (a collaboration with Steve Martin) will be out this November.

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The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of June 29th – July 3rd, 2020

An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Madeline Horwath, Peter Kuper, Julia Suits, Sara Lautman, Akeem Roberts.

Daily Shouts: Amy Kurzweil.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

To see all of the above, and so much more, go here.

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Bob Eckstein, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007, has begun writing for The Daily Beast. See his first post here.

…Prompted by a post in the Facebook Vintage Panel And Gag Cartoon Group about a Syd Hoff mural, I checked out this piece from The Orange County Register from July 6, 2007.

…More Henry Martin: it’s so great that Henry Martin is listed on this plaque at the old (but not the oldest!) New Yorker offices at 25 West 43rd Street.

 

Wednesday’s Spill: Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s; Two New (Old) Additions To The Spill’s Cartoon Library

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s

Julia Suits on turning the page.  Ms. Suits began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006.

Yesterday’s Daily cartoonist was Sara Lautman. Ms. Lautman began contributing to the magazine in 2016.

 

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Two New (Old) Additions To The Spill’s Cartoon Library

Just arrived here at Spill headquarters: two books from the 1940s (Madam Chairman, Members and Guests, from 1942, and I Feel Like A Cad, from 1944. I was curious about the Hokinson illustrated book because the title suggested the possibility of a book full of Hokinson drawings (Ms. Hokinson specialized in and became famous for her club lady drawings). Sadly, there are only six, all of them reprinted from The New Yorker. Still, a beautiful cover, and a good addition to the Hokinson illustrated book collection.

Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956). According to a New Yorker document produced during Harold Ross’s editorship (1925-1951) rating their artists, Ms. Hokinson and Peter Arno occupied a special category unto themselves above all others.

 

The other book was acquired because I’d never seen a collection of cartoons* by (Sgt.) Larry Reynolds, a three time contributor to The New Yorker.  All three of his New Yorker drawings were published before this book came out (and do not appear here). I Feel Like A Cad consists of cartoons about Reynold’s bumbling burglaring cartoon character, Butch, whose exploits, at the time of the book’s publication, had appeared in Colliers Weekly for eight years.

The photo of Mr. Reynolds from the back of his book.

And a self-portrait of Mr. Reynolds that appeared, along with a jokey biography, in the anthology  Collier Collects Its Wits, published in 1941.

For a whole lot more on Mr. Reynolds, visit Allan Holtz’s Strippers Guide.

*Mr. Holtz mentions a book published in 1941, Lines Of Least Resistance:  “collected Reynolds’s cartoons from Collier’s, the Saturday Evening Post, the New Yorker and Elks Magazine.”

It’s apparently a book of poems by the author Laurence McKinney, with Reynolds drawings included as illustrations.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker (Double Issue) June 8 & 15, 2020

The fiction issue, and it’s a double. The next Monday Tilley Watch won’t be posted til the 15th, which seems like a long way away at the moment.  As has been the case since the magazine became a work-at-home situation, the digital issue is not yet posted (writing this noonish). I’ll use the slideshow found here (you’ll have to scroll down a-ways) to do a brief run through of some of the latest cartoons.

The Cover (above right): Read the short Q&A here with cover artist Richard McGuire.

The Cartoonists: Avi Steinberg, J.A.K., Liana Finck, Tom Toro, David Sipress, Frank Cotham, Julia Suits, Emily Flake, Roz Chast, Charlie Hankin, Peter Vey, Jack Ziegler, Amy Kurzweil

The Cartoons: Avi Steinberg’s reading tree drawing caught my eye this week, as did P.C. Vey’s couple in bed with a harmonica, Julia Suits sandbox couple, and Liana Finck’s grass-fed cows.  And, not needless to say: it’s always a special treat to see work surface by the late very very great Jack Ziegler.

It’s unusual to mention the Cartoon Caption Contest drawing, but I can’t help myself this week. Enjoyed how Lars Kenseth clowned around with a car (below left).

Graphically it reminded me a little of Edward Koren’s “Well there’s your problem” published as the cover drawing (and its caption used as the title of) Mr. Koren’s 1981 cartoon collection.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Until the digital issue pops up I can’t be sure if Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead design is still in mothballs.  My guess is that it is.  In the meantime here’s what went missing in the Spring of 2017:

Read more about it here.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 4, 2020

The Cover: In Francoise Mouly’s Q&A with this week’s cover artist, Chris Ware, she informs us that the issue is anchored by “a kaleidoscopic account of a single day in New York.”  And so we see a cover, in Mr. Ware’s patented style, loaded with snapshots of the city —  a cover nearly devoid of people.

The Cartoonists:

Liza Donnelly, Robert Leighton, Amy Hwang, Roz Chast, Mick Stevens, Liana Finck, Julia Suits, Frank Cotham, Lars Kenseth, Peter Steiner, Karl Stevens, Edward Steed, Elisabeth McNair, Ali Solomon

The Cartoons:

First thing I noticed zipping through this week’s cartoons (via the slideshow on newyorker.com) is that 9 of the 14 drawings contain non-humans. Is this unusual? I don’t know; haven’t kept track of the human/non-human ratio of the cartoons over the years [if anyone has, please let me know — I’d love to see the numbers]. What may be unusual are the three drawings in a row containing two animals apiece: Ed Steed’s two cows, Elisabeth McNair’s pig and squirrel, and Ali Solomon’s two seals.

The remaining half-dozen cartoons featuring non-humans: Peter Steiner’s shark (fins), Lars Kenseth’s multitude of rabbits, Roz Chast’s cow, Liana Finck’s dog(?), and Amy Hwang’s snails. This week’s lead cartoon, by Liza Donnelly, is a direct nod to NYC’s shut-down (it features a none-too-pleased caged subway rat).

The high percentage of animals in the issue reminded me of this passage from Brendan Gill’s Here At The New Yorker:

“Once, Geraghty [the magazine’s Art editor from 1939-1973] mentioned to me that the art department ‘bank’ contained a deplorably high number of jokes featuring conversations between animals. I proposed that the artwork of an entire issue of the magazine be devoted to talking-animal jokes, thus reducing the bank and just possibly causing our readers to lose their minds.  My proposal was accepted, the issue came out, and as far as the magazine could judge, the prank went largely unobserved.” 

Other Cartoons That Caught My Eye:

It seemed pre-ordained that Roz Chast would do a panic buying drawing. Love her (signed) photo drawing of “Der Bingle.” Mick Stevens’s me time drawing is a fine/fun piece of work; applause applause for the way Frank Cotham handled the damned in his splendid media attention drawing. I’ve no idea how Mr. Cotham’s cartoon is sized (I don’t have access to the digital edition yet) but this cartoon would certainly work beautifully on a half-page.  (Update, now that the digital issue is available:  Mr. Cotham’s drawing has been run a bit larger than most of the issue’s cartoons…not a half-page tho.)

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Without having the digital issue in front of me I’ve no idea if Mr. Irvin’s classic Talk masthead (below), shown the door, and replaced by a redraw in the Spring of 2017, has finally returned.  Here’s more information on it.(Update: the redraw still appears. The classic remains in storage)

Behold the real deal!

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 2, 2020

The Cover: As mentioned last Friday, Barry Blitt‘s Bloomberg exploding cigar cover (above) was rush-released. Here’s a short piece about the cover’s subject by magazine’s art editor, Francoise Mouly.

The Cartoonists

The Cartoons

A likely too-deep-in-the-weeds observation: I believe (someone please correct me if I’m wrong!) this is the first issue of the magazine in contemporary times composed fully of stable mates whose entry into the stable dates back no further than the early 1990s (Frank Cotham, who began contributing in 1993 is this week’s elder, with 27 years at The New Yorker). On the flip side, you might recall that the last issue of the magazine (the 95th anniversary issue) contained a drawing by Edward Koren, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962. A deep (cartoonist) bench remains at The New Yorker.

Here’s the rundown of this week’s cartoonists, in order of their freshman year:

Frank Cotham (1993); William Haefeli (1998); David Sipress (1998); Joe Dator (2006); Julia Suits (2006); Emily Flake (2008); Amy Hwang (2010); Liana Finck (2013); Lars Kenseth (2016); Maggie Larson (2017); Liz Montague (2019).

Two cartoons in the issue that caught my attention both feature non-humans. David Sipress‘s stand-up kitty, and Joe Dator‘s opposum/possum. Also noted: Ed Steed‘s (sort’ve Ben Shahn-esque) full page illustration for Adam Levin’s fiction piece.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Read about Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead,shown directly below.  Below it is the redrawn version plugged-in Spring of 2017.