The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 20, 2020

Random thoughts on the cartoons (and other stuff) in the latest issue of The New Yorker

The Cover: a portrait of Martin Luther King, Jr., by Diana Ejaita.  Read a Q&A with her here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Another issue with a healthy dose of cartoons, taking place in far and afield scenarios including a yoga class (courtesy of Lila Ash), an amphitheatre (by Brooke Bourgeois), an infested restaurant, (courtesy of Joe Dator), and a health and fitness club (courtesy of P.C. Vey).

The first cartoon in the issue is by Bruce Eric Kaplan — it’s a gem. Mr. Kaplan manages to convey a lot of information within his trademark rectangle with a broad vertical right bar. We’re shown just enough of the fallen giant; we can fill in the rest. The caption, as usual with Mr. Kaplan, is succinct —  “…dead giant” seals the deal.

Of the sixteen cartoons in the issue, one is a dual effort by Kaamran Hafeez & Al Batt. Their drawing closely recalls the structure of Peter Steiner’s famous New Yorker drawing of July 5, 1993, “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” 

…Enjoyed Harry Bliss’s kid with a winged visitor cartoon (on page 35). I wonder though, if it’s already too late to close the sunroof (?).

… Suerynn Lee’s drawing (page 57) caught my attention. All the elements are there, including   excellent breathing room on the page.

…Johnny DiNapoli’s fun walrus drawing (on page 66) recalls Charles Barsotti’s simple and highly effective work.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: it was recently suggested to me that this ongoing Rea Irvin Masthead Watch is akin to tilting at windmills. To clarify the reference, here’s the relevant passage from Cervantes’ Don Quixote:

Just then they came in sight of thirty or forty windmills that rise from that plain. And no sooner did Don Quixote see them that he said to his squire, “Fortune is guiding our affairs better than we ourselves could have wished. Do you see over yonder, friend Sancho, thirty or forty hulking giants? I intend to do battle with them and slay them. With their spoils we shall begin to be rich for this is a righteous war and the removal of so foul a brood from off the face of the earth is a service God will bless.”

“What giants?” asked Sancho Panza.

“Those you see over there,” replied his master, “with their long arms. Some of them have arms well nigh two leagues in length.”

“Take care, sir,” cried Sancho. “Those over there are not giants but windmills. Those things that seem to be their arms are sails which, when they are whirled around by the wind, turn the millstone.”

…Hmmm, wow. Well, I don’t know. I never did well in lit classes. All I’m striving for is a return of Rea Irvin’s beautiful masthead. You can read more about that here.  Below is Mr. Irvin’s mothballed iconic design.

 

 

New Yorker Cartoonists (And Cakes) At The Magazine’s Holiday Party

Here are a few scenes from last night’s merry New Yorker Holiday Party. A happy throng filled a giant room on the 33rd floor of 1 World Trade Center.

All photos courtesy of Liza Donnelly, unless otherwise attributed. My thanks to cartoonists Liza  Donnelly, Joe Dator, Felipe Galindo, and Jason Chatfield for their photos.

Left: New Yorker editor, David Remnick (holding microphone) addresses the crowd. Singers in Santa hats are just behind him.

Party-goers brought food and drink (it was pot-luck), a nice throw-back to what I recall of department holiday parties many decades ago at the magazine’s 2nd address, 25 West 43rd Street.

 

Of the many cakes and cookies present (and presented), here’s one that sported a familiar face ( photo courtesy Joe Dator).

Below: The New Yorker carolers (photo courtesy Jason Chatfield).

Below: l-r, cartoonist Maggie Larson and cover artist, Jenny Kroik.

Below: cartoonist & caroler, Mort Gerberg  (photo courtesy Jason Chatfield).

Below: l-r, cartoonists Joe Dator, Ali Solomon, and Johnny DiNapoli (photo courtesy Joe Dator).

Below: l-r, cartoonists Drew Dernavich, Ellis Rosen, and by the window, Kendra Allenby.

Below: l-r, the aforementioned Ms. Allenby, Jeremy Nguyen, and The New Yorker‘s fabled Stanley Ledbetter.

Below: l-r,  New Yorker editor, David Remnick, and Pam McCarthy, the magazine’s deputy editor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: l-r, cartoonists Felipe Galindo, and Tim Hamilton.

Below: l-r, Joe Dator, Kendra Allenby, and Ben Schwartz (photo courtesy Joe Dator).

Below: cartoonists Marisa Acocella, and Bob Eckstein.

Below: The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen.

Below: cartoonist Pat Byrnes (holding red cup) surveys the food.

Below: cartoonists Robert Sikoryak, and Gabrielle Bell. (photo courtesy Felipe Galindo).

Below: l-r, cartoonist Nick Downes, and the aforementioned Mr. Ledbetter.

Below: l-r, cartoonists Jason Adam Katzenstein, Karen Sneider, Emily Flake, and The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes. (photo courtesy Felipe Galindo).

Below: cartoonists Christopher Weyant, Ms. Acocella, and coming up behind Ms. Acocella, Sam Gross.

Below: cartoonists Ellie Black, and Maggie Larson.

Below: cartoonists Joe Dator and Emily Flake,  Jason Adam Katzenstein in profile behind Ms. Flake, and Drew Dernavich, far right. .

Below: l-r, cover artist & cartoonist, John Cuneo, The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, and cover artist, Peter de Seve (this photo taken in Ms. Mouly’s “planning room” in the art department)

Below: l-r, cartoonists Jeremy Nguyen, Jason Chatfield, and Liza Donnelly

Below: cartoonists David Borchart and Felipe Galindo.

Below: cartoonists Peter Kuper and P.C. Vey

A cake with a message (photo courtesy of Joe Dator).

 

James Stevenson Documentary Film “Lost And Found” Draws New Yorker Cartoonists; The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (Yesterday’s &Today’s); Meet The Artist (1943): James Thurber; New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality

James Stevenson Documentary Film,”Lost And Found” Draws New Yorker Cartoonists

A special screening of “Stevenson Lost And Found,” a wonderful documentary film about the late great New Yorker artist and writer, attracted  a number of cartoonists last week to the Made In New York Media Center.

Here’s the crowd, post-screening, along with the late Mr. Stevenson’s wife, Josie Merck, (who is also one of the film’s executive producers), along with the film’s director and producer, Sally Williams.

Front row, left to right: Mort Gerberg, Sofia Warren, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Jeremy Nguyen, Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Sam Gross, Cerise Zelenetz, unidentified, Josie Merck, Sally Williams, Liza Donnelly.

Back row, left to right:  Jason Chatfield, Heather Loase, Ellis Rosen, Johnny DiNapoli, Kendra Allenby, Bishakh Som, Tim Hamilton, Nick Downes, Andy Dubbin, Robert Leighton, Michael Maslin

And here’s James Stevenson’e entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time idea man, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson has long been a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He is a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s recent book, published in 2013, The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, is essential.

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The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (Yesterday’s & Today’s)

To bag or not to bag, by Lila Ash. Ms. Ash began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.

Teresa Burns Parkhurst on the work days before Thanksgiving. Ms. Parkhurst began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

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Meet The Cartoonist (1943): James Thurber

Another in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943

Thurber’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Thurber  Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

And for a lot more Thurber, go here.

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New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality

Read all about it here, and see the video! (that’s The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes — who wrote the script for the video — being Heimliched in the background by actress, Madeline Wise.

The Weekend Spill: Peter Kuper’s NYT’s Book Review Back Page; The Tilley Watch Online, October 28 – November 1, 2019; Karasik Speaks; A Mary Petty Exhibit In Maryland

Peter Kuper’s New York Times Book Review  “Graphic Review”

Be sure to check out Peter Kuper’s “Graphic Review” (featured in tomorrow’s New York Times Book Review). His new book, Heart Of Darkness is out November 5th. He’ll be appearing to sign and speak about the book twice in New York next week (see yesterday’s Spill for links to venues).

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The Tilley Watch Online, October 28 – November 1, 2019: an end of the week listing of New Yorker artists that contributed online to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Ali Solomon, Karen Sneider, Johnny DiNapoli, Barbara Smaller, Kim Warp, Ellis Rosen.

Daily Shouts: Sara Lautman, Ellis Rosen & Colin Stokes, Ali Fitzgerald.

and…the stand alone feature,  Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

Go here to see all of the above and more (including Lynda Barry’s Daily Shouts piece, “Making Comics: The Face-Jam Excercise”), 

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Karasik Speaks

See the poster for all the info, and/or go here. Mr. Karasik began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

His most recent book, co-authored with Mark Newgarden, was How to Read Nancy: The Elements Of Comics In Three Easy Panels, published by Fantagraphics  in 2017.

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A Mary Petty Exhibit In Maryland

A Mary Petty exhibit is about to open at St. John’s Mitchell Gallery.  All the info here.

Ms. Petty’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Mary Petty Born, Hampton, New Jersey, April 29, 1899. Died, Paramus, New Jersey, March, 1976. New Yorker work: October 22, 1927 – March 19, 1966. Collection: This Petty Place ( Knopf, 1945) with a Preface by James Thurber.

 

 

The Wednesday Tilley Watch: Rejected New Yorker Cover Of The Week; The Halloween Dailies (Shouts & Cartoon); 37 Reasons To Buy This Cartoon Collection

Rejected New Yorker Cover of The Week

One of the best there is, John Cuneo, recently posted this rejected New Yorker cover submission. See more of Mr. Cuneo’s work on Instagram; see his published New Yorker cover art here.

— My thanks to John Cuneo for allowing me to Spill it.

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The Halloween Dailies (Shouts & Cartoon)

Shouts:  Ali Fitzgerald’s “America!: Halloween Costumes For People Who Can’t Stop Reading The News”

Ellis Rosen & Colin Stokes’s  “The Headless Horseman Tries Out Some Halloween Looks”

Cartoon:  Johnny DiNapoli’s Monster Mash

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37 Reasons To Buy This Cartoon Collection

Everyone’s A Critic, out now and available wherever great cartoon collections are sold, is loaded — Loaded! — with some of the very best single panel (i.e. New Yorker) cartoonists on the planet, and off.