Peter Arno’s Nakedly Serious Drawing; The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of June 3, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The above drawing by Peter Arno that appeared in The New Yorker in the issue of October 7, 1939 was a significant departure for an artist who is mostly remembered for his drawings of cafe society types.  As I wrote in Arno’s biography, “Though Arno’s drawings would revisit the subject of war in the coming years, his work would never again be so nakedly serious.”

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The Cover: Barry Blitt’s shoe shine cover, addressed here last week, has made media waves.  I’m re-posting a link to the brief piece wherein Mr. Blitt talks about his cover.

The Cartoonists:

Record Keeping: 14 of the 21 issues of The New Yorker published thus far this year have contained a debut drawing. This week Johnny DiNapoli enters the stable of artists. The record for new cartoonists was 2016, when 15 were brought in. As we’re still in May, that record will no doubt fall. Mr. DiNapoli is the 40th new cartoonist to debut since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in May of 2017. 

For those who like numbers it’s interesting to recognize the remarkable increase in the number of cartoonists in the magazine’s stable. During Lee Lorenz’s 24 year tenure (1973 – 1997) as Art/Cartoon editor he brought in approximately 50 new cartoonists (or roughly 2 a year).  His successor (1997-April of 2017) brought in approximately 130 in 20 years (or approximately 6-7 a year). The current pace (40 cartoonists in 2 years) means the average has leaped to 20 new cartoonists a year.

Still Missing: Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead (below) was removed in the Spring of 2017. Read about it here.

 

Animated Addams Family Trailer; Publishers Weekly MoCCA Fest Wrap-Up; Krimstein’s Gallery Talk; Reminder: A Cartoon Double Header Tonight!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Brendan Loper; Today’s Daily Shouts By Sarah Ransohoff & Johnny DiNapoli

Animated Addams Family Trailer

From Screen Rant, April 9, 2019, “The Addams Family Trailer: An Altogether Ooky Animated Movie”

Charles Addams’ Spill A-Z entry :

Charles Addams (Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s stable of artists. Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

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Publishers Weekly MoCCA Wrap-Up

Form PW, April 9, 2019, “MoCCA Arts Fest Attracts Big Crowd of Indie Fans”

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Krimstein’s Gallery Talk

Ken Krimstein, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2000, will talk about the ongoing Hannah Arendt exhibit in Chicago.  Info here

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Reminder: A Cartoon Double Header Tonight

At 6, See Bob Eckstein with Marisa Acocella, Robert Leighton, and Barbara Smaller talk shop at Rizzoli.  Then head over to see a live podcast with Jason Chatfield and Scott Dooley.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Brendan Loper mixes modern politics with the Sword in the Stone. Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

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Today’s Daily Shouts

Owls! by Sarah Ransohoff and Johnny DiNapoli.  Ms. Ransohoff began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018 (Mr. Dinapoli has contributed to newyorker.com).  

Link here to Ms. Ransohoff’s site.

Link here to Mr. Dinapoli’s site.

New Yorker Cartoonists Holiday Party

Decades ago, in the William Shawn era, New Yorker cartoonists celebrated the holidays in-house (specifically, in-department).  They’d show up at the office and drink punch provided by the art editor Lee Lorenz and his assistant, Anne Hall. Cartoonists would sample rum balls brought in by their colleague, Henry Martin.  During the Tina Brown years the holiday party went big time, when all departments went out-of-office and co-mingled in (mostly) downtown establishments.  Coming full circle this year’s party for cartoonists came back home to the offices (yay!).  Last night’s shindig was hosted by the cartoon editor, Emma Allen, and the assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes (and, shades of Henry Martin, cartoonist David Borchart even brought in some homemade cookies).

Ink Spill‘s official photographer for the evening, cartoonist Liza Donnelly attended the festivities, and captured the scene. 

Below, left to right: Kendra Allenby, Ali Soloman, Farley Katz and Emma Allen.

Below: in the foreground, Robert Leighton (on the left) speaks with Ed Steed. In the back, left-to-right, with his back to the camera is Colin Stokes, Avi Steinberg (in the hat), and a partially obscured Ellis Rosen. Between Mr. Steinberg and Mr. Ellis is the fabulous Peter Arno New Yorker cover of June 5, 1954.

Below: a frieze of cartoonists. Will mention just a few: to the far left is Emma Hunsinger. To the far right, second in, is PC. Vey.

 

Below: Mort Gerberg (on the left) and George Booth.

Below, left-to-right: Avi Steinberg, Karen Sneider, Jason Adam Katzenstein, and, with her back to the camera, Gabrielle Bell.

Below: foreground, looking at the camera is Sophia Warren, then Robert Leighton, and (with eyepatch) Mort Gerberg. In the background: far left, is Ed Steed, then (with back to camera) David Sipress, Joe Dator (with scarf), and Kendra Allenby.

Below: on the far left is Joe Dator, and then Emily Flake and Marisa Acocella.

 

Below: a waving Jeremy Nguyen and Maggie Larson. Far left, in the back is Brendan Loper.

Below, left to right:  George Booth, Liza Donnelly, and David Borchart (this photo courtesy of  Mr. Borchart).

Below: Felipe Galindo and Drew Dernavich.

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Below: The New Yorker‘s Jack-of-All Trades,Stanley Ledbetter, Johnny DiNapoli, Farley Katz, and Ellis Rosen.

Below, left to right: David Sipress and Ben Schwartz.

Below: Emma Allen and Farley Katz.

Below: the ever festive Rea Irvin type-faced logo!

 

— My thanks to Liza Donnelly, Colin Stokes, Emma Allen, and David Borchart for their assistance  with this post.