The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 22, 2019

The Cover:    As you can see by the puzzled fellow icon, I am a little puzzled (though not completely puzzled) by Christoph Niemann’s Geico-esque subway cover for the July 15th issue. Luckily, there’s the go-to weekly Q&A for those in need of clarity.

The Cartoonists:

The Newbie: Madeline Horwath debuts this week.  She is the 21st new New Yorker cartoonist this year and the 47th to join the magazine’s stable under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship (begun in May of 2017).

The Cartoons: A first impression after going through the magazine was the number of cartoons afforded generous space. Not too small, not too big, just right.  

A Selection Of The Magazine’s Moon covers: In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, there’s a page of four New Yorker covers by four artists: Charles Addams, Charles E. Martin (C.E.M.), Laura Jean Allen, and John O’Brien. But let’s not forget Alajalov, whose three Moon-centric covers perhaps qualifies him as King Of The Moon Covers.

Rea Irvin: How wonderful would it be to see Mr. Irvin’s Talk masthead return to the place it held for 92 years Until then, here’s Joe Starrett’s famous last line in Shane:“Shane! Shane! Come Back!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two Peacocks Walk Into A Room; Rare Book Of Interest: A John M. Price Cartoon Anthology: Sara Lautman’s Daily Shouts; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Avi Steinberg

In one of those million-to-one cartoon moments, both my colleague Harry Bliss (with his collaborator Steve Martin) and I have similar drawings out this week (his in his syndicated daily spot, and mine in The New Yorker). What’s unusual, besides the timing of publication, and the peacock standing in a doorway in both drawings, is the use of the peacock itself. A quick visit to the New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site turned up peacock drawings by a dozen artists. I have to think there were a number more in the magazine’s ninety-four years (the Cartoon Bank site does not provide every cartoon in the magazine’s archive). The listed peacock drawings are by: Mick Stevens, Sam Gross, Will McPhail, John O’Brien, George Booth, Bernard Schoenbaum, George Price, Edward Koren, Saul Steinberg (he has three), Robert Day, Mort Gerberg, and Victoria Roberts. There were also three peacock covers shown. The artists:  Joseph Low (the peacock is a minor character in his cover), Steinberg, and the one-and-only Rea Irvin. 

I asked Mr. Bliss if he’d like to comment on our dual peacock drawings, and here’s what he had to say:

That’s crazy! I didn’t get my new issue of The New Yorker yet, so I didn’t even know that was in there.  When I initially did my drawing, from an idea given to me by Steve Martin, I think I mentioned to Emma [Emma Allen, The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor] that I wanted it to be in color. Seeing yours now, makes me wonder if they bought yours before they had seen mine and the reason they didn’t buy mine and Steve’s is because they had already bought yours… Similars? Anyway, I think the reason there aren’t that many peacock cartoons out there is because the damn thing is so hard to draw!

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Rare Book Of Interest: A John M. Price Anthology

Warren Bernard (of SPX fame) has alerted the Spill to another rarity: a cartoon collection of work by John M. Price who contributed four drawings to the magazine (Mr. Bernard tells me that three of Mr. Price’s four New Yorker drawings appear in the collection). Here’s Price’s rather skimpy bio on the A-Z (if anyone out there has more info please send this way):

John M. Price Born  (Pennsylvania?) February 5, 1918, died January 19, 2009, Radnor, Pennsylvania. New Yorker work: February 17, 1940, March 9, 1940, June 8, 1941, and August 30, 1941. His work appeared in many publications, including The Saturday Evening Post, Esquire, The Country Gentleman, and Colliers. Key collection (self published) Don’t Get Polite with Me.

*Chris Wheeler’s fabulous site also has a scan of Price’s book (including the back cover), but I have to admit the cover never registered in my brain’s cartoon catalog. Now, having registered it, the book becomes a must-have for the Spill‘s library.  

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A Daily Shouts By…

Sara Lautman, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016, contributed yesterday’s Daily Shouts.

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

 

An Avi Steinberg summer vacation/global warming cartoon. Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.  More about him here on Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils.

 

 

Exhibit Of Interest: Peter Steiner’s Recent Paintings; The Tilley Watch Online, April 29 – May 4, 2019; Seth Fleishman’s Tribute To Nurit Karlin

Exhibit Of Interest: Peter Steiner’s Recent Paintings

Peter Steiner, a person who wears many hats (cartoonist, novelist, teacher, painter) will show recent paintings at the Hotchkiss Library of Sharon in June.  All the info here (including an expanded bio). 

Mr. Steiner began contributing his cartoons to The New Yorker in 1979. His 1993 drawing“On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog” is one of the magazine’s most reprinted cartoons in its history. 

Mr. Steiner’s next book, The Good Cop, will be out this November.

Visit his website here.

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The Tilley Watch Online, April 29 – May 4, 2019

A weekly round-up of work by New Yorker cartoonists appearing on newyorker.com’s Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Avi Steinberg, John Cuneo, Lila Ash, David Sipress, and Adam Douglas Thompson.

Daily Shouts: Ellie Black, Jeremy Nguyen (with Irving Ruan), Caitlin Cass, Ali Fitzgerald, and Roz Chast.

To see all the above, and more, link here.

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Seth Fleishman’s Tribute To Nurit Karlin

The cartoonist Seth Fleishman, is, along with John O’Brien, one of The New Yorker‘s few steady practitioners of the captionless cartoon (a far more difficult form, I’ve always believed, than the captioned cartoon).  Mr. Fleishman and Mr. O’Brien have done wonders with captionless cartoons in recent times.  

When Mr. Fleishman learned of the passing of Nurit Karlin, an earlier master whose entire New Yorker run of cartoons was, by far, captionless, he sent along this photo of himself,  sans text.

 

 

Cartoon Collection Of Interest: The Ultimate Cartoon Book Of Book Cartoons

We’ll have to wait til April for it, but judging by the “Look Inside” available on Amazon, The Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons will be well worth the wait. Published by Princeton Architectural Press, the anthology was edited by New Yorker cartoonist, Bob Eckstein.

Mr. Eckstein has packed the pages with New Yorker contributors such as Sam Gross (whose drawing graces the cover), Danny Shanahan, Liza Donnelly, Peter Steiner, Roz Chast, Arnie Levin, George Booth, David Borchart, Ed Steed, John O’Brien, and many more (the full list is below).

If you love cartoons, books and bookstores, this is most definitely the collection for you.

Complete List of Contributors:

Marisa Acocella, George Booth, David Borchart, Pat Byrnes, Roz Chast, Frank Cotham, Liza Donnelly, Nick Downes, Bob Eckstein, Liana Finck, Alex Gregory, Sam Gross, William Haefeli, Sid Harris, Bruce Eric Kaplan, Robert Leighton, Arnie Levin, Bob Mankoff, Michael Maslin, Paul Noth, John O’Brien, Danny Shanahan, Michael Shaw, Barbara Smaller, Ed Steed, Peter Steiner, Mick Stevens, Julia Suits, P.C. Vey, Kim Warp, Christopher Weyant, Jack Ziegler.

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker (Double) Issue of August 6 & 13, 2018

And now we’re into the second double issue of the summer. Sure does make the season seem to fly by. When the next new issue appears it will be mid-August, when kids begin gathering their back-to-school supplies.

 Having spent many summers at the (New) Jersey shore I found Tom Gauld’s somewhat cinematic cover an excellent piece of work.  And speaking of the Jersey shore, it was fun encountering John O’Brien‘s cartoon in the issue (although the subject matter has nothing to do with the beach scene). Mr. O’Brien was a decades-long life guard in Wildwood, New Jersey.

Fourteen cartoons in this double issue (none full page), and nineteen illustrations (four of them full page). Just sayin’.

Three cartoons caught my attention this week: 

Liana Finck’s Alice in Responsibilityland (great title). Much enjoyed roaming around Alice’s kitchen. 

Ed Steed’s drawing: a big-game hunter scenario. The first split-second impression — upon seeing the drawing on my tablet — was that the mounted objects on the wall were things that were placed so high and out of reach on grocery store shelves that they required one of those grabbing devices to get hold of them. Seeing the cartoon later on in the digital edition it’s clear the mounted objects are trash. 

Joe Dator’s chicken or egg drawing. What a treat.

For the record (your honor) here are the cartoonists in the issue:

You’ll note that Jason Chatfield shares credit with Scott Dooley.  Still somewhat a rarity to see a cartoon co-credited. Check out Messrs. Chatfield & Dooley’s podcast, Is There Something In This?   

Elsewhere in the issue, I note, as I have in every Monday Tilley Watch since May of 2017, that Rea Irvin’s classic Talk of The Town masthead is still absent.  If you want to read more, go here.

Here’s what we’re missing:

— til mid August