The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 28, 2019

The Cover this week — rushed released days earlier — is from the masterful pen of John Cuneo. Below is an early version of the published cover, provided courtesy of Mr. Cuneo.

The Cartoonists (note the Spots contribution from Ed Steed) :

The Cartoons:

A little bit of something for everyone in this issue: an ice fisherman, a whale, a cat person in a dog park, a windy city street, imbibing cave people, a library, clowns, the subway, domestic situations, the mob, a police lineup, a restaurant scenario, Snow White.

Cartoon placement-wise, it was good to see some stretching out from the usual rectangular box seated in a corner of a page. Frank Cotham’s basement drawing run three columns wide (on page 30) is a good example, as is Zach Kanin’s ice fisherman on page 63 and Liana Finck’s drawing on page 72. Brendan Loper’s party-folk drawing on page 44, and Kim Warp’s police lineup drawing on page 48 were also given more breathing room. Then there’s Will McPhail’s full page (with the “Sketchbook” heading of “L’) on page 43. I’ve given this drawing some extra thought this morning, wondering if it needed the “Sketchbook” heading. What exactly does the “Sketchbook” designation bring to the page. I also wonder if those outside the New York/ Metropolitan area understand that the “L” refers to the “L” line of the New York City subway system (and local stories concerning the line). And then there’s the question of whether the “L” train reference actually means something here that’s essential to understanding the little story played out in sequence. Perhaps, perhaps. Perhaps not. So many questions! Anyway, it’s a fun drawing that works well no matter the subway line. As noted with a hint of impatience on Cartoon Companion, New Yorker subway cartoons have become nearly a standard scenario in recent months. I continue to believe that no scenario is played-out if the idea works well.

A subway sidenote: when I think of previous multi-panel subway cartoons my first thought is of this one by Liza Donnelly from the New Yorker issue of April 14, 1986. And speaking of Ms. Donnelly, in her cave man drawing on page 21 of this latest issue of the magazine there’s not a cave man in sight.

I’ve been re-watching the entire run of “The Sopranos” lately, so Joe Dator’s cement shoe drawing on page 52 grabbed my attention. I especially enjoyed seeing the George Boothian bare light bulb hanging down from the ceiling.

This issue marks the New Yorker print debut for Emily Bernstein. Ms. Bernstein is the third new New Yorker cartoonist of the year and the 28th since Emma Allen became the magazine’s cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

The Tilley Watch again signs-off with a nod to the missing Rea Irvin masthead (seen below). Read about it here.


John Cuneo’s Walled In New Yorker Cover; The Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The New Yorker has rushed released the cover of its forthcoming issue. It is the second cover by John Cuneo to appear in the last five issues. Here’s the magazine’s Cover Story on the piece.

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Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC‘s Max and Simon take us through each and every cartoon in the January 21st issue of the magazine, discussing & rating as they go. See it here.

The Guardian On Comics & Graphic Novels; Cartoon Companion Rates Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Shermund’s Santas on Attempted Bloggery

The Guardian‘s Comics and Graphic Novels page is a fun go-to site.  Currently there is a podcast featuring Ken Krimstein, and several Liana Finck posts. 

Both of these New Yorker contributors have new books well worth looking into:

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The CC boys, “Max” and “Simon” are back with their rated takes on the cartoons appearing in the latest New Yorker (the December 17th issue — the one with John Cuneo‘s Sipping Santa on the cover). 

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Shermund’s Santas on Attempted Bloggery

Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery has been posting a number of  Santa-flavored Barbara Shermund cartoons this week.  Check ’em out here.

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of December 17, 2018

The Cover:  You want Santa Claus on the cover of The New Yorker, you got him.  Here’s the cover artist, John Cuneo talking about his terrific cover as well as George Price (and others) as inspiration along the way.

The Cartoonists This Week:

The Cartoons & Illustrations: Twenty illustrations this week, with four-and-a-half of those full pages.  Twelve cartoons. 

Next Week: the last issue of 2018 — it’s a double issue.

Still Missing: Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead, replaced last year.  Read about it here.  My my my, what a thing of beauty:

 

 

Victoria Roberts Pencilled; Attempted Bloggery on Cuneo’s Art; Seth’s Commencement Address; Philip Roth Jaywalking on West 79th St.

Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils returns with a look at Victoria Roberts’ tools of the trade. See it here!

Ms. Roberts began contributing to The New Yorker in 1988.

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Attempted Bloggery on Cuneo’s Art

This week Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery looks at items acquired at the MoCCA Fest.  Today it’s John Cuneo‘s Not Waving But Drawing. Read it here. Above right: Mr. Cuneo’s most recent New Yorker cover.

Photo above: Mr. Cuneo in the foreground seated next to Anelle Miller, the Director of The Society of Illustrators.  In the back, from left to right: Cartoonist Felipe Galindo, Stephen Nadler, and cartoonist Marc Bilgrey  (photo courtesy of Liza Donnelly).

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Seth’s Commencement Address

From The Comics Journal, May 22, 2018, “Seth’s 2018 Center For Cartoon Studies Commencement Speech” — read the entire address here.

Seth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002.

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A Split-Second Encounter With Philip Roth

Back in the Fall of 2014, driving on Columbus Avenue, I made a right turn onto West 79th Street. As my wife and I once had an apartment on 79th I often made a point of driving past the address on the way back upstate. For some reason on this particular day, after rounding the corner, and well short of our old apartment building, I immediately pulled over on the north side of the street and illegally parked for a moment. Just then a taxi pulled right in front of me, and parked. The right side back door of the taxi opened and a fellow holding a cane gingerly got out. He started to make his way to the rear of the cab and then began to negotiate between the cab’s rear bumper and my front bumper. I wanted the guy to know I wasn’t going to move my car while he was there — a simple courtesy — so I looked right at him, and he looked right at me (I suppose to make sure I wasn’t going to move my car): it was Philip Roth. I waited til he’d crossed diagonally southwest on 79th before taking the picture you see above.  A nice split-second encounter with a favorite writer.