The Weekend Spill: Exhibit Of Interest “Asian Babies: Works From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists”; The Tilley Watch Online, Sept. 2-6, 2019; Profile Of Interest: Roz Chast

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Asian Babies: Works From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists

A must-see exhibit curated by Jeremy Nguyen and Amy Hwang.  All the info above!

Alice Cheng began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017; Maddie Dai in 2017; Amy Hwang in 2010; Suerynn Lee in 2019; Evan Lian in 2019; Hartley Lin in 2019; Christine Mi in 2018; Jeremy Nguyen in 2017, and Colin Tom in 2015.

You can see work by all of the above artists here on The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site.

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The Tilley Watch Online, September 2-6, 2019

 

A gathering of the New Yorker cartoonists whose work appeared this week on The Daily Cartoon and/or  Daily Shouts.

Daily Cartoon: John Cuneo (a Bonus Daily), Ali Solomon, Tim Hamilton, J.A.K., and Jon Adams.

Daily Shouts: Avi Steinberg (with Irving Ruan).

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

See all of the above and more here.

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Profile of Interest: Roz Chast

From Hamilton College, September 6, 2019, “Drawing On Fidgety Brilliance” — a short profile of Roz Chast.

Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978. Visit her website here.

 

Exhibit & Discussion Of Interest: John Kascht; A Bonus Daily Cartoon By John Cuneo; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Liza Donnelly Visits The Umbrella Cover Museum

Exhibit & Discussion of Interest: John Kascht

A traveling exhibit of John Kascht‘s work opens at The Cartoon Art Museum (that’s out in San Francisco) September 22nd, before heading east to The Billy Ireland Cartoon Museum and Library.  Mr. Kascht made his New Yorker debut in the issue of November 9, 1992 with a portrait of Jay Leno.

Mr. Kascht told the Spill that:
“The exhibition includes 75 original drawings and watercolors, a big wall of pencil sketches, step-by-step process displays, and my never-before-exhibited life drawings of Katharine Hepburn which are, as far as I know, the last images ever made of her.”

If you’re out west and can make the September opening you’ll be able to catch Mr. Kascht in conversation with Pete Docter, the Chief Creative Officer of Pixar. Info here and on the poster below. And here’s a link to info on the exhibit catalog.

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A Bonus Daily Cartoon By John Cuneo

John Cuneo, the artist who gave us the walled-in Trump New Yorker cover early this year is back with another Trumpian drawing. See it here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Ali Solomon on the last barbecue of Summer.  Ms. Solomon began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.

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Liza Donnelly Visits The Umbrella Cover Museum

From Medium, September 5, 2019, The Umbrella Cover Museum — Ms. Donnelly, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982, gives us a graphic report. Visit her website here.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 29, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon; A Julia Wertz Daily Shouts; Fave Photo Of The Day

The Cover:  I see destructive tourists at the core of this cover, yet destruction doesn’t come up in Joost Swarte’s interview with The New Yorker‘s art director, Francoise Mouly.  Odd?

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Almost a theme issue, of sorts:  Amy Hwang (cats), Roz Chast (dogs), Farley Katz (flamingos), Joe Duffy (pigs), Kendra Allenby (deer), Frank Cotham (a snake), Shannon Wheeler (snails), Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell (a rat).

Steering briefly away from the Spill‘s focus, I have to note that Salman Rushdie’s piece in the issue  is titled “The Little King” and the accompanying illustration (by Nico Schweitzer) is a play on Otto Soglow‘s famous character. The illustration seems even closer to the toy Little King than the drawing of the King :

 

 

Applause for Bob Eckstein‘s shuttlecock drawing on page 48, and Ellis Rosen‘s heralded fellow drawing on page 42.

 

From the Department of fun coincidences. Liana Finck’s lifeguard drawing (p. 33) immediately reminded me of an obscure original Lee Lorenz drawing hanging here at Spill headquarters. The Lorenz drawing (its barely legible caption: “Help!”) was not in The New Yorker.  I’ve yet to figure out where it was published, or how old it is.  Mr. Lorenz, visiting here and seeing the drawing, could not recall where it had appeared or its vintage. It appears to be in an earlier Lorenz style (but not the earliest), so we can at least place in an early-to-mid 1960s time frame.

Ms. Finck’s drawing and Mr. Lorenz’s are in some ways opposites of each other. Mr. Lorenz’s beach is overcrowded, while Ms. Finck’s beach is empty.  Ms. Finck’s life guard offers help (if helped); Mr. Lorenz’s life guard is crying out for help. What ties them together, at least for me, is the graphic core of each drawing: the exceptionally tall life guard stand. Fine fun work by both. 

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead (below) left us in the Spring of 2017 after 92 years of service — it was replaced by a redraw.  Let’s hope the real thing returns before long.  Read about it here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon

Brendan Loper makes good use of oven mitts. Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

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A Julia Wertz Daily Shouts

“Conversations With Ma: Paint The Toenails And Board-Game Gripes” 

— A series? by Julia Wertz who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

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Fave Photo Of The Day

A crowd of folks who draw got together yesterday in Rhinebeck, New York.  Left to right: myself, Peter Steiner, John Cuneo, R.O. Blechman, Liza Donnelly, Bill Plympton, Danny Shanahan and Elwood Smith.

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 27, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Farley Katz

The Cover: A standup paddle boarder in the shadow of The Brooklyn Bridge. Read about Malika Favre’s eighth New Yorker cover here. (if you go online you’ll see that the little paddleboarder’s been animated. What a world!)

The Cartoonists:

You’ll note New Yorker cover artist, John Cuneo’s name in the list, but this is the first time Mr. Cuneo’s name appears among the cartoonists — it’s his New Yorker cartoon debut. Mr. Cuneo is the 13th addition to the magazine’s cartoonist stable this year and the 39th new cartoonist added to the roster since Emma Allen was appointed cartoon editor in May of 2017. 

The Cartoons: Just for fun, as I did here a few weeks ago, I went back a number of years (40 this time) to this date and took a look at the issue’s cartoonists and cartoons. Here’s the line-up from the issue of May 28, 1979:

As with the last time I did this, the number of cartoonists in the back issue is double the number in the present issue (22 in 1979; 11 in 2019). But…as was the case last time, the back issue was far heftier in page count (128) than this latest issue (78), so proportionately, the cartoonists are holding their own, numbers-wise.  The 1979 issue does however feature a wonderful two-and-a- half page Steinberg spread (“Cousins”). 

The Illustrations: The 2019 issue contains 20 color illustrations, including 3 1/2 full page  illustrations. The 1979 issue contains 2 small b&w illustrations.

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A fun thing: The very first cartoon in the 1979 issue is by Jack Ziegler.  Coming across it this morning I remembered that Mr. Ziegler and I briefly discussed the drawing in the Spill‘s two-part 2016 Ziegler interview:

Michael Maslin: Here’s another far eastern themed drawing: Fleetwood Mac. I’ve always loved it because I never understood Fleetwood Mac.

Jack Ziegler: This was a much earlier Fleetwood Mac I was referring to, around the time they got mega platinum. I just needed the name of a band there.

MM: You just imagined this scene?

fleetwood-mac

JZ: Yeah, right. Almost everything I do is as far as the scene background settings – it’s all made up.

MM: What are those little things off to the left on the bottom.

JZ: Oh those are just little houses down the hill. What did you think they were?

[laughter]

MM: Structures of some kind – I just wanted to be sure.

(you can see all of Pt.1 here, and all of Pt. 2 here. The above is found in Pt. 2)

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Rea Irvin: and of course one major difference between the older issue and this week’s issue is that Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead was still in its usual spot in 1979. In 2019, the puzzling redraw of Mr. Irvin’s work continues its run. Read about these two designs here. Below: Irvin’s still a-missin’ and missed masthead.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Farley Katz delivers the post Game of Thrones Daily.  Mr. Katz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

 

 

 

 

Exhibit Of Interest: Peter Steiner’s Recent Paintings; The Tilley Watch Online, April 29 – May 4, 2019; Seth Fleishman’s Tribute To Nurit Karlin

Exhibit Of Interest: Peter Steiner’s Recent Paintings

Peter Steiner, a person who wears many hats (cartoonist, novelist, teacher, painter) will show recent paintings at the Hotchkiss Library of Sharon in June.  All the info here (including an expanded bio). 

Mr. Steiner began contributing his cartoons to The New Yorker in 1979. His 1993 drawing“On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog” is one of the magazine’s most reprinted cartoons in its history. 

Mr. Steiner’s next book, The Good Cop, will be out this November.

Visit his website here.

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The Tilley Watch Online, April 29 – May 4, 2019

A weekly round-up of work by New Yorker cartoonists appearing on newyorker.com’s Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Avi Steinberg, John Cuneo, Lila Ash, David Sipress, and Adam Douglas Thompson.

Daily Shouts: Ellie Black, Jeremy Nguyen (with Irving Ruan), Caitlin Cass, Ali Fitzgerald, and Roz Chast.

To see all the above, and more, link here.

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Seth Fleishman’s Tribute To Nurit Karlin

The cartoonist Seth Fleishman, is, along with John O’Brien, one of The New Yorker‘s few steady practitioners of the captionless cartoon (a far more difficult form, I’ve always believed, than the captioned cartoon).  Mr. Fleishman and Mr. O’Brien have done wonders with captionless cartoons in recent times.  

When Mr. Fleishman learned of the passing of Nurit Karlin, an earlier master whose entire New Yorker run of cartoons was, by far, captionless, he sent along this photo of himself,  sans text.