The Tilley Watch; Liza Donnelly’s Veterans Day Animation; Joe Farris’s Soldier’s Sketchbook

The Cover: this week’s cover (titled “Welcome to Congress”) by Barry Blitt was mentioned here last week (it was released early). It received a bit of media attention. One example: this Huffington Post piece. 

The Cartoonists, the Cartoons:

13 cartoons this week.  19 illustrations, with 5 of them full page.

Two items of note in the list of cartoonists: a joint effort by Mick Stevens and Jenny Allen.  And, unless I’m mistaken, Lonnie Millsap is making his debut in the magazine. If that’s accurate (someone please advise if it’s not) he is the 9th new cartoonist this year, and the 21st since Emma Allen was appointed the magazine’s cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

Update: Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead is still a-missin (you can read about it here). This is what it looks like:

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And:

here’s Liza Donnelly’s Veterans Day animation for CBS News .

…this is a good day to recall A Soldier’s Sketchbook by the late New Yorker cartoonist Joe Farris.  Published in 2011 by National Geographic, the book is available online at the usual places. 

Here’s the Booklist review:

“Farris, best known postwar as a cartoonist for the New Yorker, offers this evocative memoir-album, with a scrapbook graphic design. Replete with faux-yellowed pages, it chronicles his tour of duty using his contemporary illustrations, his letters to his Connecticut family, and present-day reflections on the attitudes and fears of his innocent 19-year-old self. With meticulous National Geographic maps tracking his regiment’s advance through France and Germany, Ferris’ is an honestly written, visually captivating volume and a superb addition to the genre of WWII artwork.”

 

Ed Fisher dies at age 86

 

Bob Mankoff, the New Yorker’s cartoon editor has announced on his blog that long time New Yorker cartoonist, Ed Fisher has died at age 86.  Mr. Fisher contributed over 700 cartoons to the magazine, beginning with the issue of October 27, 1951.  His last cartoon appeared January 17, 2000 (this last cartoon appears on Bob Mankoff’s blog post along with several others). His New York Times obit (April 8, 2013) contains a good deal of biographical information.

 

The New Yorker’s former Art Editor/Cartoon Editor, Lee Lorenz, wrote in his book The Art of The New Yorker 1925 – 1995, that Ed was among the small pool of cartoonists once considered to succeed James Geraghty as Art Editor when Geraghty announced his retirement in 1972 after holding that position since 1939 (other candidates included Charles Barsotti and Donald Reilly).  Lorenz was appointed by the magazine’s editor, William Shawn, to succeed Geraghty in 1973.

 

Ed was among the generation of cartoonists — those who began contributing to the magazine before Lorenz became Art Editor —  whose cartoon ideas were often secured for the more established artists, like Whitney Darrow, Jr., George Price, or Peter Arno. In a letter dated September 2000, Ed wrote to me of his experience:

“…Geraghty would take one of my roughs and say ‘this one’s perfect for Arno.’ And sometimes I’d reluctantly agree and sometimes not. Jim harvested gags for several of the great masters from us newcomers…and now and then, leafing in one of the albums [those hardcover collections of cartoons the magazine once published]  I’ll suddenly remember: that’s my gag!”

 

Four collections of Fisher’s work were published: Ed Fisher’s First Folio (Macmillan,1959), Wine, Women and Woad: A Tale of Decadent Rome (Macmillan, 1960), and Ed Fisher’s Domesday Book (St. Martin’s, 1961). He was also a co-editor of The Art in Cartooning: Seventy-five Years of American Magazine Cartoons (Scribner, 1975).  Maestro, Please!  a collection of musician themed cartoons was published by Applause Books in the 1990s.

 

In the Foreward to his Domesday collection, Ed wrote:

You can judge a man not only by the company he keeps but by the jokes he tells. Gather a bundle of his jokes, lay them out neatly, study them — and you will find his philosophy of life, revealed, as in an essay.

 

By the time I met Ed he was a twenty-seven year veteran at The New Yorker, yet his demeanor suggested he had just walked into the office for the very first time to present his batch of cartoons to the editor. Energetic, open, supportive — a fellow enjoying to the hilt the strange world and community he was devoted to.

 

 

Below: Donald Reilly, Warren Miller, Ed Fisher and Joe Farris during a much needed break at the Arnold Newman photo shoot along the Hudson River, NYC,  1997. (photo by Liza Donnelly).

Shanahan & Donnelly’s Online Cartoon Collection; Joe Farris Exhibition; Victoria Roberts Draws at NYC’s Strand Bookstore; Bruce Kaplan’s new show; Chast & Popeye; More Steinberg

 

From The Huffington Post, December 21, 2012,  this online only collection of cartoons by Danny Shanahan and Liza Donnelly for Moms Clean Air Force.

 

From CTpost. com, December 18, 2012, “New Yorker artist’s work on view in Bethel”

–This post on long time New Yorker contributor, Joe Farris

 

 

From the blog, East Village, December 19, 2012, “Victoria Roberts Sketches at The Strand”

 

From Deadline Hollywood, December 14, 2012, “HBO Orders Comedy Pilot From Bruce Eric Kaplan, Jason Reitman And Lorne Michaels”

 

From cartoonbrew, December 14, 2012, “Popeye Comics Get Cool” — ( with Roz Chast content).

 

 

 

 

 

MORE STEINBERG:

From The Stamford Advocate, December 20, 2012, “New Haven Biographer Examines Famed New Yorker Cartoonist” –This interview with Deirdre Bair, the author of Saul Steinberg: A Biography.

and:

From Pace University, this interview with Ms. Bair. “Prof. Denning Interviews Bestselling /Biographer Deidre Bair” (the interview must be downloaded).

and:

From The Observer, December 18, 2012, “The Life of The New Yorker’s Favorite Depressive is Drawn Out in New Bio”