Podcasts Of Interest: Joe Dator, Chris Ware; AddamsFest Begins In His Hometown; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; A Daily Shouts By…Amy Hwang

Podcast Of Interest: Joe Dator

Mr. Dator, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006, was a guest on The Better Breakroom. Visit his website here.

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Podcast Of Interest: Chris Ware

Chris Ware was Gil Roth’s most recent guest on his long-running (and cartoonist-filled) podcast The Virtual Memories Show.  Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

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Addamsfest Begins In His Hometown

And it begins! Charles Addams hometown of Westfield, New Jersey begins its month long celebration.  All the details here.

Mr. Addams entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Charles Addams (Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A UFO, and politics, by David Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

 

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A Daily Shouts By…Amy Hwang

Are you Very Organized?  by Amy Hwang, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2010.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 30, 2019

The Cover: Christoph Niemann returns for the Technology Issue.  Read Francoise Mouly’s Q&A with him about his cover.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

Electronically flipping through this new issue (appropriately enough for the Technology Issue) I was happy that the cartoons just kept-a-comin’; there are seventeen of them to be exact. All of them are placed well (i.e., they have plenty of breathing room, and sit well on the page).

Here are random thoughts about some of the cartoons in the new issue…

Joe Dator’s laundromat drawing (page 50): When asked why The New Yorker didn’t run color cartoons*, The New Yorker‘s founder and first editor, Harold Ross reportedly said, “What’s so funny about red?”  What he didn’t say was,“What’s so funny about beet red?”  Mr. Dators’ drawing, incorporating beet red, is hilarious.

I hovered over Victoria Roberts’ campers and bear drawing (p.46), enjoying the drawing itself. We’re used to seeing many of Ms. Roberts drawings set indoors — it’s fun to see her drawing of a tent, and a bear (or a man in a bear suit).

Jason Patterson’s ice cream trucks heading south for the winter  (p. 25) is also fun to linger on. Its concept seems out of the Jack Ziegler school of zany.  Such a good drawing.

Also of note, graphically, and otherwise-ly: Ellie Black’s little red riding hood drawing (p.78)…and Maggie Mull’s Beautiful Mind-ish drawing on page 70; nice to see it stretched out on the page.

Shannon Wheeler’s broccoli opera drawing on page 77.  Its execution is reminiscent of some of William Steig’s middle period work (check out Steig’s 1942 collection, The Lonely Ones).

And of note in a different department: the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes’ Shouts & Murmurs piece,“Running With Scissors” (p.33).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead drawing (below) has yet to return.  Hope springs eternal here on The Spill. Read about it here.

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*There were two color cartoons in Ross’s era, very early on in the magazine’s life; both appeared in the issue of December 12, 1925. A full page by Ralph Barton, and a double page spread by Rea Irvin. Mr. Barton did not use red in his drawing, Mr. Irvin did.

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Fave Photo Of The Day: Gerberg & Booth; Thurber’s Art Celebrated!; The Tilley Watch Online; Event Of Interest: Roz Chast

Fave Photo Of The Day

Courtesy of Sarah Booth, this fab photo of New Yorker artists Mort Gerberg and George Booth, taken this past Friday following Mr. Gerberg’s gig playing Cole Porter’s piano at The New York Historical Society.

Mr. Gerberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 1965.

Mr. Booth began contributing to The New Yorker in 1969.

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Thurber’s Art Celebrated!

Thurbermaniacs rejoice! Besides two new Thurber books (shown below), there is The Columbus Museum of Art exhibit,  “A Mile and a Half of Lines: The Art of James Thurber” — according to The Columbus Dispatch, it’s “the first major and largest exhibit of its kind” of Thurber’s drawings. The exhibit will not tour, so catch it while you can. There is also a terrific new Thurber website from Michael J. Rosen, who’s central to this 125th anniversary celebration.  Visit the Thurber site here.

James Thurber’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

James Thurber Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

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Here’s a roundup of the week’s New Yorker cartoonist contributors to the Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts.*

Daily Cartoon: Peter Kuper (twice in the week), Joe Dator, Tim Hamilton, Barry Blitt (a Daily Bonus cartoon), and J.A.K.

Daily Shouts: Emily Flake (with David Bradley Isenberg), Liana Finck (another installment of her “Dear Pepper” series), and Sara Lautman.

* a new (?) entry by Barry Blitt — outside of the Daily headings — appeared this week: Blitt’s Kvetchbook (not to be confused with “Barry Blitt’s Sketchbook” published in Graydon Carter’s  Air Mail).

 

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Event of Interest: Roz Chast

Ms. Chast, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978,  will speak at The Museum of The City of New York in October. Details here.

A Case For Pencils Spotlights David Ostow; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Case For Pencils Spotlights David Ostow

Jane Mattimoe’s latest A Case For Pencils blog features David Ostow’s tools of the trade. Mr. Ostow began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.  Links galore for his work can be found at the tail end of the Case blog post.

(Screen grab above of an Ostow drawing from A Case For Pencils)

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The fab Joe Dator is today’s Daily cartoonist. Mr. Dator has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2006.  Visit his website here.

 

The Wednesday Watch: Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; New Market Watch…Air Mail; Donnelly Live-Draws Dem’s Debate; A Susanne Suba Re-Issue

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Desert drinks by Lila Ash, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.

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New Market Watch

Considering the narrowing avenues for cartoonists , it’s always a brighter day when a cartoon-carrying publication is launched.  We now have two (online-only) issues of former Vanity Fair editor, Graydon Carter’s Air Mail to peruse. You’ll find cartoons under the heading “Small Talk” (not an exclusive-to-cartoons-heading). Many, if not all of the cartoonists in these first two issues seem to have caravanned over from the recently de-cartooned Esquire, where Air Mail‘s cartoon editor was formerly (and briefly) the cartoon editor.  New Yorker readers will recognize most of Air Mail‘s cartoonists appearing in these first two issues; they include Alex Gregory, Maddie Dai, Joe Dator, Drew Dernavich, Chris Weyant, Seth Fleishman, David Borchart, and Charlie Hankin.

Two other New Yorker artists (primarily contributors of New Yorker covers ) are given their own “Sketchbook” slots: Barry Blitt, and the legendary Edward Sorel (casually referred to under the heading, “Ed Sorel’s Sketchbook”).

The one nit-picky thing I’ll say about Air Mail‘s cartoon slot is that I wish the space allotted each cartoon wasn’t so compressed (the bright red Small Talk banner actually looks to be weighing down on a number of the cartoons,  invading the cartoon’s space).  I’ve always believed cartoons are better off with breathing room surrounding them (i.e., shown graphic respect).  You’ll notice that a number of text features ( Science, Tech Lab, But First…, Highlight, Crime) all have a horizontal line placed below their heading, cleanly separating the feature’s title from the article.

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Liza Donnelly Live-Draws Dem’s Debate

Check out Liza Donnelly’s graphic take on last night’s debate. 

Ms. Donnelly has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1982.

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A Susanne Suba Re-Issue

Originally published in 1951 by Rand McNally (cover on the left), The Theatre Cat by Noel Streatfeild, with illustrations by New Yorker artist Susanne Suba will be re-issued this September by Scholastic. 

Susanne Suba’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Born Budapest, Hungary 1913. Died February, 2012, NYC. Ms. Suba contributed numerous “spot” drawings to The New Yorker, as well as five covers and one cartoon, published September 18, 1948. Her first cover appeared October 21, 1939, and her last, March 2, 1963. Besides her work for the magazine she was a prolific illustrator of children’s books. A collection of her spot drawings was published in 1944, Spots By Suba: From The New Yorker (E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc, NY).

Link to the Spill‘s appreciation of Ms. Suba here.