The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of June 29, 2020

The Cover: a beauty by Diana Ejaita. Her third for the magazine — read about her others here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

The Bruce Eric Kaplan drawing — it’s on page 39 — ever-so-vaguely reminded me of this National Lampoon “Vacation” scene (and that reminded me of the whole movie — not a bad way to begin the week).

Charlie Hankin’s funny quinoa drawing (p.50) made me briefly search my cartoonist memory bank for the correct pronunciation of “quinoa” — a word I’ve heard spoken a-plenty, but not one I’ve spoken (maybe ever). Tom Toro’s bats drawing (p.45) is also fun. I wonder how many bat drawings have been published in The New Yorker with a bat or bats central to the cartoon’s idea, not just background bats.

P.C. Vey’s drawing (p.46) caught my attention for two reasons: 1. it’s funny, and 2. it’s funny that the central character (the fish in the fishbowl) is so small. Finally, a nice surprise to see a magic carpet drawing (courtesy of Victoria Roberts), and see Joe Dator go big (on p. 26) with his museum piece.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: go here to read up on the eighty-sixing of Mr. Irvin’s iconic design for The Talk Of The Town back in the Spring of 2017. Here’s what we’re missing…

Alan Dunn’s New Yorker Honor Roll; The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of June 1, 2020

Above: The New Yorker War Cartoons  1945 Special Edition For The Armed Forces.  For more on The New Yorker‘s special war editions go here.

The  above War Cartoons cover by Alan Dunn originally appeared on The New Yorker issue of August 11, 1945. Nearly a year later Mr. Dunn revisited the Honor Roll with this cover of July 27, 1946:

Mr. Dunn’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Alan Dunn (self portrait above from Meet the Artist) Born in Belmar, New Jersey, August 11, 1900, died in New York City, 1975. NYer work: 1926 – 1974 Key collections: Rejections (Knopf, 1931), Who’s Paying For This Cab? (Simon & Schuster, 1945), A Portfolio of Social Cartoons ( Simon & Schuster, 1968). One of the most published New Yorker cartoonists (1,906 cartoons) , Mr. Dunn was married to Mary Petty — together they lived and worked at 12 East 88th Street, where, according to the NYTs, Alan worked “seated in a small chair at a card table, drawing in charcoal and grease pencil.”

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The Cover:

And on into June with another cover (we are told) reflecting this strange time. You might not know this cover was presented to us as timely without knowing the title (“Lockdown Sampler”). Without the title, in a different time, we would likely see this cover, as William Steig once defined (pre-Tina Brown) New Yorker covers, as a “special moment — fleetingly observed.”

Read a short Q&A with Roz Chast here about her cover.

 

The Cartoonists:

Two duo efforts in this issue, with one duo, Sophie Lucido Johnson (and, I’m taking a guess here on this link:) Sammi Skolmoski new to the cartoonist stable. The Spill custom is to count a duo as one new entry on the A-Z, which means the Johnson/Skolmoski duo are the 9th newbies so far this year, and the 62nd newbies brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship (begun in May of 2017).

The Cartoons: a number jump out for me — five to be exact. Curiously (or not) they appear in a row, beginning with Emily Flake’s clowns about to pie throw (perhaps my favorite Flake drawing ever), followed by Lars Kenseth’s airport baggage moment, then Danny Shanahan’s fab accessorized dinosaurs, Joe Dator’s E.T. bicycle rental scenario, and finally Farley Katz’s Sunset Boulevard-ish” Instagram drawing.

See the slideshow of this week’s drawings here (if you scroll down a bit).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Regular Spill visitors will recognize that every Monday Tilley Watch ends with the Irvin Talk Masthead Watch.  Mr. Irvin’s classic design is still missing (it went away in the Spring of 2017, replaced by a…gasp!…redraw…read about it here). Here’s Mr. Irvin’s mothballed classic design:

 

 

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Revisiting Joe Dator’s Classic “How We Do It”; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Revisiting Joe Dator’s Classic “How We Do It”

Whenever I allow myself a moment to think about what it is I do for a living and the terrific people I share this weird occupation with, I think of Joe Dator’s fabulous New Yorker piece from the issue of September 24, 2012. It is one of my all-time favorite Joe Dator drawings. Additionally, it’s one of my favorite contemporary New Yorker graphic pieces. Its good cheer has never failed me. My thanks to Mr. Dator for permission to run it here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Paul Noth with an Animal Crossing court. Mr. Noth has been contributing to The New Yorker since  2004. Visit his website here.

 

The Weekend Spill: From The Spill’s Library: A Look At New Yorker Biographies (Etc.); The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of May 11-15, 2020; Joe Dator’s Animation

 

From The Spill’s Library: A Look At New Yorker Biographies (Etc.)

If you’ve been spending as much time as I have online, you’ve seen multiple postings by individuals of their personal library (or parts of). Since visiting my fave bookstore is out of the question for now, I’ve found  browsing book collections by others a ton ‘o fun.  I’ve seen a number of (possible) must-have books over the past few weeks — books I didn’t know existed, or books I’d forgotten about. Over the years, I’ve done a few posts on what’s on the Spill’s shelves. Thurber biographies most recently, and not too long ago, a few of Thurber’s books here at Spill headquarters.

Below you’ll see another group that is ordered by subject (the subjects being folks who were or are New Yorker contributors).  This group of books is an arm’s length from where I sit; I like being able to lean back in my office chair and grab a needed title. I’ve included the whole of the Spill‘s E.B  White collection (mostly books by him, and the great White bio by Scott Elledge) because much of his work seems (to me) to fit into autobiography. The A-Z section begins just to the right of Katharine White’s Onward And Upward in the Garden with Renata Adler’s Gone. Not everything New Yorker contributor/autobiographical/biographical is shown here. Books by the subjects (that is, books by New Yorker contributors) are on the other side of my desk — not arm’s length, but close enough. There’s plenty of autobiographical material in many of them (the Updike and Roth books alone take up a couple of shelves). There are also books that haven’t yet found a shelf (I need to build more). But the ones shown here are the core — the go-to books that help me determine what was what and who was who at The New Yorker.

The Ross section includes a title that might cause some head-scratching: Good Food For Bad Stomachs by Sara M. Jordan, M.D. & Sheila Hibben. It’s there because the (4 page)  Introduction was written by Harold Ross.

 

 

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The Tilley Watch Online, May 11-15, 2020

An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Colin Tom, Tom Toro, Lars Kenseth, David Sipress, Elisabeth McNair.

Daily Shouts: Olivia de Recat, Gabrielle Bell.

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Joe Dator’s Animation

The fab Joe Dator has posted a four minute animation. Mr. Dator had this to say about it on Facebook:

My quarantine project for several weeks has been writing and directing this animated short film, called “EARTH”, about an alien invasion gone wrong. I’m thrilled to finally to be able to show it to you guys!  

See it here.

Joe Dator began contributing to The New Yorker in August of 2006.  Visit his website here.

The Wednesday Watch: Sam Gross Is On Facebook!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The New Yorker Issue Of April 25, 1931; More Spills: Toro’s New Book; Latest Celeb Caption Contest Video

Sam Gross Is On Facebook!

The one, the only, the fabulous Sam Gross now has a Facebook page.

Mr. Gross’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Sam Gross Born 1933, Bronx, NY. New Yorker work: August 23, 1969 –. Other than his work in The New Yorker, Mr. Gross is probably best known for his work in National Lampoon. He’s edited a large number of collections, including Dogs Dogs Dogs, Cats Cats Cats, Food Food Food: A Feast of Great Cartoons (originally published as All You Can Eat: A Feast of Great Cartoons); Golf Golf Golf, Ho! Ho! Ho!, Movies Movies Movies. Key collections: I Am Blind and My Dog is Dead (Avon, 1978), An Elephant is Soft and Mushy (Avon, 1982)

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Lars Kenseth on being there, sort of.

Mr. Kenseth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

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A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The New Yorker Issue Of April 25, 1931

As usual with this Spill fave blog, it’s always a kick looking at what was happening in the New Yorkersphere way way way back when

Gotta love the Helen Hokinson cover.

Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

Helen Hokinson  Born, Illinois, 1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956). According to a New Yorker document  produced during Harold Ross’s editorship (1925-1951) rating their artists, Ms. Hokinson and Peter Arno occupied a special category unto themselves above all others.

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...Tom Toro‘s first kids book is just out.  Read about it here.  Congrats,  Mr. T!

…the latest celeb New Yorker Caption Contest video has been posted. Several fun/funny captions  by Ellie Kemper & Daniel Radcliffe (the cartoons captioned are by David Borchart, Tom Cheney, Joe Dator, Leo Cullum, Maggie Larson, and Danny Shanahan).