Personal History: Work Wall

I’ve always worked at home, sometimes in a dedicated corner of the living room, sometimes using the arm of any old comfortable chair as a desk. But for many years I worked in a converted 6′ x 8′ laundry room. My desk faced a wall, part of which is shown above.  One day, after about twenty years of working in front of that wall, I felt I needed open space, and so I picked up my Rapidograph and a small stack of bond paper, then walked fifteen feet or so into our living room and set up shop at a table with no wall in front of me.

I left my old work area completely intact — a stack of bond paper still rests in its usual place —  and every so often I return to work there (I’m working there now).  What you see above is fragment of the wall above my desk. The collection of cartoons has always been a kind of rotating mini-gallery. There are a lot of New Yorker materials on the shelves (mixed in with childhood train set buildings, metal toys, art made by my kids, etc., etc.).  Just for fun, I’ve provided a key to anything New Yorker-related (and a few not)

1.  Joe Dator New Yorker original drawing. Published February 28, 2011.

2.  Stan Hunt original drawing.  Publishing history unknown. The fellow on the porch swing is saying to the woman: “Darling, your eyes are like dark limpid pools! …What’s the matter, aren’t you getting enough sleep?”  Mr. Hunt contributed to The New Yorker from 1956 though 1990.

3. Charlie Hankin original drawing. Unpublished. The sign on the lawn reads “Beware of Clam”

4. George Booth original. Titled Dog, Chair, and Chicken. Unpublished. Mr. Booth drew this in The New Yorker‘s cartoon department a few years ago while being filmed. Luckily, Liza Donnelly was also there being filmed.  Mr. Booth generously handed the drawing to her when filming wrapped. 

5. E.B. White’s The Lady Is Cold.  His first book. This became the subject of an Ink Spill piece.

6. Batman Giant No. 182.  In the late 1960s,  when my family moved from one end of town to the other end, only two comic books of my vast comic book collection made the transition (sad, I know). This is one of them.

7. The New Yorker Album.  Published in 1928 by Doubleday, Doran & Co. The very first New Yorker cartoon album.

8. A Rox Chast letter from the pre-personal computer days, probably late 1980s. In this New Yorker cartoon crowd, exchanged letters were usually illustrated.  I’m especially fond of this one because of the White Castle drawing at the very top (it’s possible my White Castle coffee mug made an impression on her).

9. We’ll Show You The Town. A 1934 promotional book from The New Yorker‘s business  department. You can see a little more about this if you go to the From the Attic section of the Spill and scroll down.

10. What! No Pie Charts?  An undated promotional book from The New Yorker‘s business department. Profusely illustrated by Julien de Miskey. As the copy refers to the magazine’s original address as 25 West 45th Street, we can safely assume this was published pre mid-1930s.

11. The American Mercury. August 1948.  Up on the shelf because of the great cover of the magazine’s founder and first editor, Harold Ross along with a re-drawn (i.e., non Rea Irvin) Eustace Tilley. The cover story “Ross Of The New Yorker” by Allen Churchill is a good read.

12. Curtain Calls of 1926. From the title page:

In which a few choice rare bits that have occasionally appeared in the pages of The New Yorker repeat themselves.

This is a lovely little book spotlighted on the Spill in July of 2013. Rea Irvin did the Tilley drawing on the cover.

13. Batman In Detective Comics Vol. 1 (Abbeville Press 1993).  Covering the first 25 years.  Vol. 2 is sitting right behind it. 

14. A Thurber Garland. Published by Hamish Hamilton in 1955.

15. The Making Of A Magazine. Undated. A promotional booklet collecting some, but not all of Corey Ford’s pieces. Drawings by Johan Bull.   Link here for more info.

16. James Thurber’s New York Times obit, dated November 3, 1961. The headline reads: James Thurber Is Dead At 66; Writer Was Also A Comic Artist . I’ll say!    Read more here on the Spill’s morgue.

***unnumbered, appearing just below #6’s Batman Giant, and the toy helicopter, is Otto Soglow’s Little King pull toy.  You can see it close up in the From the Attic section.

 

Article Of Interest: Liza Donnelly…”Let Your Mind Wander…”; Podcast Of Interest: Joe Dator On Fiction & Non-Fiction; A Classic Passage Illustrated By Huguette Martel

Article of Interest: Liza Donnelly

From WePresent, “Liza Donnelly: ‘You’ve got to let your mind wander and listen to yourself think'”

Ms. Donnelly has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1982.  Visit her website here.

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Podcast of Interest: Joe Dator

From Fiction Predictions “We are all handmaids now” —  Joe Dator speaks about his popular New Yorker Daily cartoon (above). Link here to listen.

Mr. Dator has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2006.  Visit his website here.

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Huguette Martel’s Classic Passage illustrated

Huguette Martell, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1990, has depicted her “favorite passage from… a  beloved book” for the Sunday New York Times Book Review last page.  The above is not that piece, but from The New York Review of books where you an see plenty more of her wonderful paintings.

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They’re Practically Giving It Away

 The price, for a used copy of The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons is now at $27.07 (on Amazon).

Travels With Walter Groovy: Joe Dator & Friend In Japan; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: David Sipress

Joe Dator, fresh off his win at the NCSFest (he won in the category of Best In Gag Cartoons), headed to Japan with his traveling companion, Walter Groovy.  I asked Mr. Dator to talk a little about Mr. Groovy:

Well, he’s the doughy balding middle aged man who shows up in my cartoons quite a bit, enough so that I gave him a name. I took him to Australia in 2017, he was with me at the Reuben Awards in CA last week, and I’m probably taking him with me to Italy later this year. 

Mr. Dator added: “If he looks a little different, it’s because he’s a special version I dubbed “Konnichi-Groovy.'”

Above: Konnichi-Groovy and Mr. Dator — on the right, Mr. Dator with Mr. Groovy at the NCSFest

Mr. Dator began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006.  Visit his website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Politics and UFOs, courtesy of David Sipress, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998.

 

Cornish Cartoonist Residency Fellowship Offered; Today’s Daily Shouts By… Ali Solomon; Podcast Of Interest: Mort Gerberg; Video of Interest From The National Cartoonists Society; Fave Photo Of The Day: 3 NCS Award Winners

The Center For Cartoon Studies up in White River Junction, Vermont has announced its fourth Residency Fellowship.  According to the announcement:

This residency is made possible by former CCS board member, cartoonist Harry Bliss, whose work regularly appears in The New Yorker. “I want to attract the best cartoonists working today and create a residency that is a one-of-a-kind opportunity for storytellers who are pushing the boundaries of the medium,” Bliss said.

Link here for all the info, including a short promotional video.

The deadline for applying is August 15th!

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Today’s Daily Shouts…

…(Game of Thrones-ish, but of course) is by Ali Solomon, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018. 

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Podcast Of Interest: Mort Gerberg

Hot on the heels of Mort Gerberg’s exhibit in New York and various promotional venues for his latest book (pictured) is an interesting podcast with via Podbean.  

 

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NCSFest Video of Interest

There’s a little something called the NCSFEST (i.e., the National Cartoonists Society Festival) happening this weekend on the left coast.  Here’s a link to a video featuring several New Yorker colleagues, including Arnold Roth, Jason Chatfield, and Lars Kenseth (his scene at the 5:12 mark is a highlight, along with Mr. Roth’s affectionate Gold T-square moment at the very end of the video). 

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Fave Photo Of The Day

 Three fine folks with their NCS Awards (category indicated): l-r, Peter Kuper (Graphic Novels), Maria Scrivan (Greeting Cards), and Joe Dator (Gag Cartoons).  Congrats to all!

–photo from social media via Maria Scrivan

 

The Tilley Watch Online, May 13-17, 2019

An end-of-week round-up of cartoonists contributing to newyorker.com’s Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon Cartoonists:Emily Flake, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Brendan Loper, Jason Adam Katzenstein, and Joe Dator.

Daily Shouts Cartoonists: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Olivia de Recat.

To see all of the above, and more, link here.