Blog Posts Of Interest From Mike Lynch; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…and Yesterday’s); Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Blog Posts Of Interest From Mike Lynch

   Cartoonist Mike Lynch has posted two back-to-back New Yorker items of interest on his blog. Today’s is a look at some of Steinberg’s drawings from All In Line (the 1947 paperback edition), and yesterday a piece on a film about New Yorker cover artist Andre Francois. See them here.

Steinberg’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Saul Steinberg Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

Andre Francois’s entry on the A-Z:

Andre Francois (photo: 1978) Birth/death information from his New York Times obit of April 15, 2005: Born Andre Farkas, 1915, Timisoara. Died, April, 2005, Grisy-les-Platres, France.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…and Yesterday’s)

Emily Bernstein, who began contributing to The New Yorker in July of last year, on shopping now. Yesterday’s Daily was by Emily Flake, who began contributing to the magazine in 2007.

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Yesterday’s Daily Shouts

A trio effort by cartoonist Jeremy Nguyen, along with writers Irving Raun, and Julia Edelman. Mr. Nguyen began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

The Weekend Spill: Emily Hopkins Essay; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of March 9-13, 2020

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Essays Of Interest…Includes Emily Hopkins

Pretty Bitches: On Being Called Crazy, Angry, Bossy, Frumpy, Feisty, And All the Other Words That Are Used To Undermine Women has just been released by Seal Press. Edited by Lizzie Skurnick, it includes an essay by New Yorker cartoonist Emily Hopkins (Emily Richards at the time of her New Yorker debut) is included.

More: See Ms. Hopkins’ Secret Showcase of My Family Portraits here.

Ms. Hopkins entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Emily Richards (now Emily Hopkins) New Yorker work: 2004 – . Born, Boston, Massachusetts, 1970.  Grew up in Oregon, Hawaii, West Virginia, and Virginia.  Attended Williams College and West Virginia University. Received a masters degree at Johns Hopkins University. Worked, initially, as a New Yorker fact checker before becoming a New Yorker cartoonist. When Ms. Richards married New Yorker cartoonist Marshall Hopkins they became the third married New Yorker cartoonist couple in the magazine’s history (Mary Petty & Alan Dunn were the first, Liza Donnelly & Michael Maslin were the second). Ms. Richards (Hopkins) is the first known black female New Yorker cartoonist.

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A listing of New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to newyorker.com this past week

The Daily Cartoon: Peter Kuper, Andy Dubbin, Jon Adams, Pat Achilles, Teresa Burns Parkhurst.

Daily Shouts:  Avi Steinberg( with Irving Raun & Mia Mercado), Jeremy Nguyen (with Taylor Garron).

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

See the week’s cartoons and humor pieces here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 10, 2020

The Cover: a photographer. Go here to read a short Q&A with the cover artist, Malika Favre. 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:  Random thoughts on just a few of the dozen drawings in the issue

Two New Yorker Cartoon Gods in this issue: Sam Gross and Edward Koren. Mr. Gross, who has the lead cartoon in the issue — and what a great drawing it is! — has been contributing since 1969.  Mr. Koren has been contributing his fab work, covers and drawings, since 1962.

…the issue’s second drawing — it’s by Emily Bernstein — features a fiery ball heading for Earth (a meteor? Guess it doesn’t matter exactly what it is. What it is for certain is trouble). It’s the second fiery ball about to crash into Earth drawing in the magazine within the past three issues (Jessica Olien had one in the issue of January 27th). Is the fiery ball about to hit Earth the new crash test dummy scenario?  These aren’t the first published by the magazine — my hope is they won’t be the last. Can’t wait to see what colleagues do with it (haven’t tried one yet myself, but the day is young).

…I really like Mike Twohy’s personal info drawing (p. 36). He employs a little used (anymore)  folksinger scenario. I’m always reminded, seeing a folksinger drawing, of the one below by the late, exceptionally great, Charles Saxon. I first saw it in The New Yorker Album Of Drawings 1925-1975  (I started my collection with that Album). The drawing originally appeared as a full page in The New Yorker issue of January 24, 1970.

…Jeremy Nguyen’s drawing (p. 38) deals with an issue  — table wobble — most of us have dealt with at one time or another. A fun intricate well-executed drawing…

…J.A.K.’s octopus on page 42 brought to mind an on-the-spot cartoon fact-checking moment I experienced in front of an auditorium filled with school children about a decade ago. I’d just drawn an octopus on a large pad of paper. The school principal, standing onstage with me, came over and, counting aloud — a teaching moment — made sure I’d drawn all eight arms (I had). Mr. Katzenstein has drawn all eight arms as well (yes, I counted).

The Rea Irvin Missing Talk Masthead Watch

Rea Irvin, The New Yorker‘s art supervisor who gave us the magazine’s inaugural cover featuring Eustace Tilley, designed the above masthead. It sat in place for 92 years before being replaced in 2017 by a re-draw (heavens!). Read about it here. The magazine’s 95th anniversary issue, out next week, would be the perfect occasion to return Mr. Irvin’s iconic design.

 

 

 

 

New Yorker Cartoonists (And Cakes) At The Magazine’s Holiday Party

Here are a few scenes from last night’s merry New Yorker Holiday Party. A happy throng filled a giant room on the 33rd floor of 1 World Trade Center.

All photos courtesy of Liza Donnelly, unless otherwise attributed. My thanks to cartoonists Liza  Donnelly, Joe Dator, Felipe Galindo, and Jason Chatfield for their photos.

Left: New Yorker editor, David Remnick (holding microphone) addresses the crowd. Singers in Santa hats are just behind him.

Party-goers brought food and drink (it was pot-luck), a nice throw-back to what I recall of department holiday parties many decades ago at the magazine’s 2nd address, 25 West 43rd Street.

 

Of the many cakes and cookies present (and presented), here’s one that sported a familiar face ( photo courtesy Joe Dator).

Below: The New Yorker carolers (photo courtesy Jason Chatfield).

Below: l-r, cartoonist Maggie Larson and cover artist, Jenny Kroik.

Below: cartoonist & caroler, Mort Gerberg  (photo courtesy Jason Chatfield).

Below: l-r, cartoonists Joe Dator, Ali Solomon, and Johnny DiNapoli (photo courtesy Joe Dator).

Below: l-r, cartoonists Drew Dernavich, Ellis Rosen, and by the window, Kendra Allenby.

Below: l-r, the aforementioned Ms. Allenby, Jeremy Nguyen, and The New Yorker‘s fabled Stanley Ledbetter.

Below: l-r,  New Yorker editor, David Remnick, and Pam McCarthy, the magazine’s deputy editor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: l-r, cartoonists Felipe Galindo, and Tim Hamilton.

Below: l-r, Joe Dator, Kendra Allenby, and Ben Schwartz (photo courtesy Joe Dator).

Below: cartoonists Marisa Acocella, and Bob Eckstein.

Below: The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen.

Below: cartoonist Pat Byrnes (holding red cup) surveys the food.

Below: cartoonists Robert Sikoryak, and Gabrielle Bell. (photo courtesy Felipe Galindo).

Below: l-r, cartoonist Nick Downes, and the aforementioned Mr. Ledbetter.

Below: l-r, cartoonists Jason Adam Katzenstein, Karen Sneider, Emily Flake, and The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes. (photo courtesy Felipe Galindo).

Below: cartoonists Christopher Weyant, Ms. Acocella, and coming up behind Ms. Acocella, Sam Gross.

Below: cartoonists Ellie Black, and Maggie Larson.

Below: cartoonists Joe Dator and Emily Flake,  Jason Adam Katzenstein in profile behind Ms. Flake, and Drew Dernavich, far right. .

Below: l-r, cover artist & cartoonist, John Cuneo, The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, and cover artist, Peter de Seve (this photo taken in Ms. Mouly’s “planning room” in the art department)

Below: l-r, cartoonists Jeremy Nguyen, Jason Chatfield, and Liza Donnelly

Below: cartoonists David Borchart and Felipe Galindo.

Below: cartoonists Peter Kuper and P.C. Vey

A cake with a message (photo courtesy of Joe Dator).

 

The Wednesday Watch: Meet The Artist (1943): Rea Irvin; Event Of Interest: Jeremy Nguyen; A Case For Pencils Spotlights Robert Leighton’s Tools Of The Trade; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Meet The Artist (1943): Rea Irvin

The last in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943.

Here’s Mr. Irvin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Rea Irvin  *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

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Event Of Interest: Jeremy Nguyen

From Meetup.com, “Jeremy Nguyen: The Cartoon Life” –presented by The Comic Arts Workshop.

Mr. Nguyen began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017. Visit his website here.

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A Case For Pencils Spotlights Robert Leighton’s Tools Of The Trade

From A Case For Pencils, December 3, 2019, “Robert Leighton” — another entry in Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful series of posts looking at the tools of the trade used by various New Yorker artists.

Robert Leighton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002. Visit his website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Raking & shoveling by Paul Karasik, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1999.