Thurber Thursday: Fave Cover; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Article Of Interest: “School Days Influences…”

Of all the Thurber books published in his lifetime it’s the cover of Let your Mind Alone! that I’ve always liked best. Notice I said the cover, and not the book (I like the book too, but it’s not my favorite).

The cover relies on a single Thurber drawing, “Motorman Concealing His Sex Life from a Woman Psychologist” (it appears, run vertically, in Chapter 9).

I’ve never thought too much about why the cover is so appealing (and I won’t now) — it’s just one of those things. A quick thought is that the cover drawing seems an odd choice considering the other choices within. Perhaps it’s the oddity that’s appealing.

According to Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography , the first edition (published September of ’37) was  5000 copies. By year’s end there were six editions.

A few things about my copy: someone glued the dust jacket flap — just the flap — on the inside front cover of my copy. And: next to the fellow on the right, there’s a barely visible white line impression of the fellow walking off under the glued down flap. 

Funnily enough, even though the dust jacket cover is my fave, I do not have it (other than that glued inside flap mentioned above). My copy, a first edition, bought for $2.50 (‘as is”) decades ago, was coverless.

There are a number of later editions, with other covers, but for me, the first is the best (the Armed Services Edition is pretty great too).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Maddie Dai on a deep-sixed Christopher Columbus.

Ms. Dai began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.  Visit her website here.

 

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From The Elective, June 11, 2020, “School Days Influences: Inside The World Of New Yorker Cartoonists”

Eight* New Yorker cartoonists and one** cover artist on their schooling.

*Lila Ash, Liza Donnelly, Amy Hwang, Navied Mahdavian, Sam Marlow, Liz Montague, Jeremy Nguyen, Ellis Rosen, **Robert Sikoryak.

Illustration: Michael Witte‘s cover for The New Yorker Book Of Teacher Cartoons

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: The Tilley Watch Online, May 18-22, 2020; A New Yorker State Of Mind Goes Deep Into The Issue Of May 2, 1931; Attempted Bloggery Shows Us Peter Arno’s Alemite Ads; Some Content Released For The Upcoming Cartoon Collection “All’s Fair In Love & War”

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The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of May 18-22, 2020

An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Jeremy Nguyen, David Sipress, Paul Noth, Ellis Rosen, Ali Solomon

Daily Shouts: Jason Chatfield (& Ethan Hall)

…and:

From the Culture Desk: Emily Flake’s “My Stupid Quarantine Body”

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Up and Inside”  & “Theatre Of The Absurd”

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A New Yorker State Of Mind Goes Deep Into The Issue Of May 2, 1931

One of the Spill‘s fave sites really goes to town with this particular installment. If you want to be carried away from 2020 for a bit, take a look.

Cover by Theodore Haupt, one of forty-four for the magazine.

As a sort of extra add-on to the NYSoM’s  “Tete-a-tete” section concerning Mr. Pulitzer’s fountain, here’s an Oct. 10, 2014 Spill entry

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Attempted Bloggery Shows Us Peter Arno’s Alemite Ads

Here’s a fun post from another Spill fave blog.  Attempted Bloggery looks at the Peter Arno Alemite campaign. See it all here.

[and wow! — just look at Arno’s composition in the ad shown above]

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Some Content Released For The Upcoming Cartoon Collection “All’s Fair In Love & War”

If you check out Amazon’s listing for the Bob Eckstein edited All’s Fair In Love & War (Princeton Architectural Press), you’ll be able to see 21 of the collected cartoons if you click on “Look Inside” and an additional 18 (with some duplications from “Look Inside”) if you click on the  array  of thumbnail cartoons shown below the cover.

Also shown on “Look Inside” is Mr. Eckstein’s introduction and the complete list of contributors. The book, the third in the Ultimate Cartoon Book series, comes out October 20th of this year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cartoonist Event Of The Month: “Funny Ladies At The New Yorker” With Roz Chast, Liza Donnelly, And Liana Finck In Conversation Via The Society Of Illustrators; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

From The Society of Illustrators, this news of a live online chat with Roz Chast, Liza Donnelly, and Liana Finck, May 27th at 6:30.  All the info here.

Here are the Spill‘s entries for each of these fine cartoonists:

Roz Chast ( Photo: Bill Franzen) Born, Brooklyn, NY. New Yorker work: 1978 –. Key collection: Theories of Everything ( Bloomsbury, 2006). Her book, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?: A Memoir (Bloomsbury, 2014) was a National Book Awards finalist (nonfiction) in 2014.  Website

Liza Donnelly  Born, Washington, D.C.. New Yorker work: June 21, 1982 –. Key book: Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005).  Donnelly is the innovator of a form of visual journalism, covering news and cultural events by digitally drawing them in real time and sharing them.  Website

 

Liana Finck ( Photo: John Madere) Born in 1986. New Yorker work: February 25, 2013 –. Studied at Cooper Union College, 2004 – 2008. Fulbright Fellowship to Brussels, 2009. Passing For Human was published in 2018 by Random House.  Website.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Jeremy Nguyen on escaping. Mr. Nguyen has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Visit his website here.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 20, 2020

A Note To Readers: Due to the times we’re in the digital edition of the magazine appears later in the day than usual. Thus, instead of the usual look through the magazine, I’m working off of the slide show of cartoons on newyorker.com, as well as the cover Q&A found there. If any mistakes are made on my part I’ll correct them once the digital issue is posted.

Update: 1:00pm.  Digital issue posted about an hour ago.

The Cover: Owen Smith gives us a tired worker (the piece is titled — and again, why do we need cover titles? —  “After The Shift”)…four out of the last five covers have been corona virus themed. Read about the cover here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

I don’t know how others respond to an issue’s cartoons. For me, it’s always at least a two-level response:

1. How each drawing hits me — did a drawing stand out (for better or worse).

2. The feeling from all the drawings combined: was it a strong issue of work, or not.

This new issue feels strong, covering a wide range of territory in cartoonland, from aliens (courtesy of Charlie Hankin) to a PC Satyr (from Edward Koren), from dolphins in a swimming pool (McPhail), to what might be found on the other side of the mountaintop (Colin Tom)… and so much more.

 

The Rea Irvin Masthead Watch:

Rea Irvin, the fellow shown here, did so much to shape the look of The New Yorker (okay, I’ll say it — he was instrumental). One of his greatest lasting contributions was adapting Allen Lewis’s typeface; it eventually became known as the Irvin typeface, although these days I hear it   referred to as the New Yorker typeface.  Among Irvin’s many contributions other than art supervisor to Harold Ross (in itself a huge contribution!) was contributing covers, including, of course, the very first one, featuring Eustace Tilley. He also contributed cartoons, and headings for various departments. His design for Talk Of The Town stood in place (with a few adjustments in the magazine’s earliest days) for 92 years, until May of 2017 when his iconic design was mothballed and replaced by a redraw.

Am I wrong to think of Irvin’s typeface, his Tilley, his Talk masthead, and his “catholic” taste in cartoon selection as representing the graphic soul of the magazine?  So many modern changes (or “tweaks” as they were referred to) were test ballooned in recent years and then withdrawn (layout, typography, headings, etc., etc.) —  why not bring back this not insignificant bit of soul.

 

The Weekend Spill: A Book Of Interest On The Horizon; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of April 6-10, 2020

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It appears that this long-ago rejected cover painting is going to be a Spill Easter thing. ___________________________________________________________

 

An Editor’s Burial: Journals and Journalism From The New Yorker and other Magazines, coming our way in July from Penguin/Random House.

 

This from the publisher:

A glimpse of post-war France through the eyes and words of 14 (mostly) expatriate journalists including Mavis Gallant, James Baldwin, A.J. Liebling, S.N. Behrman, Luc Sante, Joseph Mitchell, and Lillian Ross; plus, portraits of their editors William Shawn and New Yorker founder Harold Ross.

Together: they invented modern magazine journalism. Includes an introductory interview by Susan Morrison with Anderson about transforming fact into a fiction and the creation of his homage to these exceptional reporters.

 

I’m guessing the piece on Harold Ross by S.N. Behrman is “Harold Ross: A Recollection”  from Mr. Behrman’s The Suspended Drawing Room (Stein & Day, 1965). It’s good reading.

 

The Lillian Ross material possibly (likely!?) from her oddly unconvincing memoir of Shawn, Here But Not Here (Random House, 1998).

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An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: P.C. Vey, David Sipress, Mort Gerberg, Brendan Loper, Jeremy Nguyen.

Daily Shouts: Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook, “He Walks Among Us” — this piece on John Prine.

…and from The Culture Desk, this Paul Karasik piece, also on John Prine.

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