The Wednesday Watch: Peter Kuper’s NYTs Silent Spring Piece; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Liza Donnelly’s World Wildlife Fund Earth Day Drawings; The Weekly Humorist’s Cartoon Desk

Peter Kuper’s New York Times Silent Spring Piece

From The New York Times Book Review, this graphic review of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring by Peter Kuper, who’s on a roll this week — he also has a full page color Comic Strip in The New Yorker.

(read a little about it here at The Daily Cartoonist; a link is supplied to Mr. Kuper’s piece in the New Yorker)

 

Mr. Kuper’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Peter Kuper Born, 1958, Summit, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 6, 2011 – . Website: peterkuper.com  For more biographical information, visit his Wikipedia page.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

An Earth Day cartoon from Avi Steinberg.

Mr. Steinberg has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2012.

 

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Liza Donnelly Draws For The World Wildlife Fund’s Art For Nature

From Twitter, this screen grab showing the info:

Ms. Donnelly has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1982. Visit her website here.

…More Donnelly (& company): From The AAEC, “Live From Their Home Studios — Cartoonists Online” — this piece on various online exploits from members of the  American Association of Editorial Cartoonists.

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The Weekly Humorist’s Cartoon Desk

The other day the Spill mentioned The American Bystander’s  dedicated page for cartoons; here’s another place to go to see a variety of cartoonists. The Weekly Humorist‘s Cartoon Desk includes a goodly number of New Yorker cartoonists, including Bob Eckstein, Ali Solomon, Michael Shaw, Kim Warp, Peter Kuper, David Ostow, Pat Byrnes, Lila Ash, Ivan Ehlers, Jason Chatfield, Cerise Zelenetz, Lars Kenseth, Evan Lian, and Rich Sparks.  Visit it here!  

 

 

 

 

 

 

55 Years Ago Today; A Timely 1960 Frank Modell Cartoon; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; A Cartoonist At The Culture Desk; The Passing of Mad’s Mort Drucker

55 Years Ago Today

The other day I mentioned that April 10th is the 55th anniversary of the publication of Mort Gerberg’s first New Yorker drawing (I Spilled the drawing published in that issue of April 10, 1965).  It was, however, not the first drawing he sold to the magazine. His first sale appears above (quite a beginning!).  It appeared in the issue of October 30, 1965. The Spill congratulates the artist on his 55th!

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A Timely 1960 Frank Modell Cartoon  

This Frank Modell drawing appeared in The New Yorker February 27, 1960. I’d say that by now most of us have a pretty good idea the answer to the question.

My thanks to Daniel Borinsky for finding and sending the drawing along.

Frank Modell’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Frank Modell (photograph taken early 1990s) Born, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 6, 1917. Died, May 27, 2016, Guilford, Connecticut. New Yorker work: 1946 – 1997. Mr. Modell began his New Yorker career as assistant to the Art Editor, James Geraghty. He soon began contributing his cartoons (and cartoon ideas for others), with his first drawing appearing July 20, 1946. Besides his work for The New Yorker, he was a children’s book author and an actor (he appeared, most notably, in Woody Allen’s 1980 film, Stardust Memories). Key collection: Stop Trying To Cheer Me Up! (Dodd, Mead, 1978).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Comforting bunny talk from P.C. Vey. Mr. Vey began contributing to The New Yorker in 1993.

Visit his website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell: “Movies Remade for Socially Isolated Viewing”

Ms. Campbell began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2017.  Visit her website here.

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From The Culture Desk

Paul Karasik on the death of John Prine.

Mr. Karasik began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

 

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The Spill Notes The Passing Of The Great Mad Artist, Mort Drucker

I have to believe that untold numbers of New Yorker cartoonists self-educated by looking through MAD magazine. A large part of that education would’ve included taking in Mort Drucker’s gazillions of drawings. Mr. Drucker, who passed away this week at age 91, was one of the Mt. Rushmore figures in Mad’s stable (the Usual Gang of Idiots).

The National Cartoonists Society Tweeted the below:

And here are just a few pieces published since the news broke:

From Mad Magazine: “RIP Mort Drucker 1929-2020” by The Editors.

From The New York Times: “Mort Drucker, Master Of The Mad Caricature, Is Dead At 91” by J. Hoberman.

From The Washington Post: “Mort Drucker who drew humor from life in Mad Magazine dies at 91” by Matt Schudel.

From The Washington Post:  “Mort Drucker’s legendary Mad magazine caricatures spoofed Hollywood — and Hollywood loved them” by Michael Cavna.

From Rolling Stone “Mad magazine cartoonist Mort Drucker dead at 91” by Jon Blistein

…and from the New Yorker cartoonist, Jason Chatfield, this tribute.

 

The Weekend Spill: Cartoonists Offer #Cartoonrelief To Those Hit Hardest By Covid-19; The Tilley Watch Online, March 30 – April 3, 2020; Tom Gauld’s Collection Reviewed

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While checking in on a New Yorker cartoonist Slack group a few days ago I noticed a number of my cartoonist colleagues had begun using their art to help those in need during this pandemic. I asked if one of the organizers would explain in detail what they were up to. So here is my New Yorker cartoonist colleague, Amy Kurzweil to tell you about an incredibly worthy effort, #Cartoonrelief:

#Cartoonrelief was born on the New Yorker Cartoonist Slack channel. Navied Mahdavian posted that he’d just bought some photographs from Italian artists raising money for local hospitals, and wanted to know if we cartoonists were interested in selling prints or drawings for a coronavirus cause. I was just about to do something similar on my instagram; a couple times annually I sell prints and originals and give half the proceeds to charity, and this seemed like a moment to up my charitable game. I chose (and often raise money for) Give Directly because their charitable model makes the most sense to me; they give unconditional, direct cash transfers to people living in extreme poverty; they’re highly rated by charity watch orgs because their model means overhead costs are low and decisions about how to spend money are as local as possible. Usually their efforts are global, but right now they have a fund that sends cash to US families hit hardest by COVID-19. 
Other cartoonists jumped on board, and we each made our own choices about what to offer and for how much, given our various constraints at the moment. Avi Steinberg is offering digital portraits, Navied Mahdavian is offering original cartoon drawings, Brendan Loper is offering original cartoon drawings, digital prints, and pet portraits, Sofia Warren is offering originals portraits and original collaborative cartoons, Kendra Allenby is offering signed prints and one-on-one art consultations, Ivan Ehlers is offering prints and custom digital portraits. Neil Dvorak is offering prints, Tom Chitty is drawing robots on horses. Each of our offerings is set at a different price-point, between $25 and $125; people just have to message us the receipt for their donation. I’m offering drawn portraits for $100 and personalized digital cartoon prints for $50. Most people are going for portraits, usually of a loved one: a child they’re quarantining with, a partner they are or aren’t quarantining with, a coworker they’re missing. Although it’s been a lot of work, it’s felt quite meaningful to enter people’s lives momentarily through the act of drawing the people they love. All the responses have been incredibly validating. Here are a few of the portraits I’ve done so far:
And here are some other offerings:
Original Cartoons from Navied:
A collaborative cartoon from Sofia and a donating contributor:
I’ve noticed people have been making much larger donations than I suggest. For example, someone just sent me a receipt for $1000. I think people who can give, want to give, and they appreciate encouragement and validation for doing so. Together we’ve raised $8,000 +… and counting!
If you’d like to join us: Our efforts are unified under the hashtag #cartoonrelief, and any cartoonists can get involved by offering whatever art they can, for a COVID-19 related charitable cause. We’re encouraging of cartoonists and cartoon supporters to propose their own charity or fund they believe is helping with medical or economic relief right now.
If people have any questions about how to get involved, or want to support our efforts, you can reach out to any of the cartoonists mentioned above on Instagram, or email me directly: amykurz@gmail.com 
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A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features during the week of March 30 – April 3, 2020.
The Daily Cartoon: Peter Kuper, Shannon Wheeler, Jon Adams, Johnny Dinapoli, Kendra Allenby.
Daily Shouts: Liana Finck, Jason Chatfield (with Ginny Hogan), Avi Steinberg.
…Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.
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Tom Gauld’s Cartoon Collection Reviewed
Mr. Gauld is a New Yorker cover artist.

 

Thurber Thursday; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Thurber Thursday

Of the many Thurber articles in Life magazine, I’ve always been partial to the one appearing in the March 14, 1960 issue (not too long before his death, in November of 1961). It includes a number of pages of great photos (one shown above, and one shown below) as well as a page of Thurber quotes (“Barbed Shafts Of A Veteran Wit”) on various topics, such as World Madness, Writing, and Drawing.  Here’s what he said about Drawing:

“My drawings have been described as pre-intentionalist, meaning they were finished before the ideas for them had occurred to me. I shall not argue the point.”

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist:

Shannon Wheeler on the part of the movie we’re in.  Mr. Wheeler began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009.

Visit his website here.

 

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Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist: Jason Chatfield (with Ginny Hogan): “Wrong Ways To Meditate”

Mr. Chatfield began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.  Visit his website here.

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Shop Talk Of Interest: Jason Chatfield

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Zoe Si on self-helping in this time.

Ms. Si began contributing to The New Yorker last month.

Visit her website here.

 

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Shop Talk Of Interest: Jason Chatfield

Here’s a quick fun read from Jason Chatfield, a cartoonist colleague who wears many hats (actor, stand-up comedian, comic strip artist). Mr. Chatfield began contributing to The New Yorker in the Spring of 2017.

Read his piece, posted today:  “Shop Talk. Read before you write. Look at art before you draw. Get your head in the game.”

Pictured: inspiring art Mr. Chatfield pasted on his closet doors when he just a lad.