James Stevenson Documentary Film “Lost And Found” Draws New Yorker Cartoonists; The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (Yesterday’s &Today’s); Meet The Artist (1943): James Thurber; New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality

James Stevenson Documentary Film,”Lost And Found” Draws New Yorker Cartoonists

A special screening of “Stevenson Lost And Found,” a wonderful documentary film about the late great New Yorker artist and writer, attracted  a number of cartoonists last week to the Made In New York Media Center.

Here’s the crowd, post-screening, along with the late Mr. Stevenson’s wife, Josie Merck, (who is also one of the film’s executive producers), along with the film’s director and producer, Sally Williams.

Front row, left to right: Mort Gerberg, Sofia Warren, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Jeremy Nguyen, Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Sam Gross, Cerise Zelenetz, unidentified, Josie Merck, Sally Williams, Liza Donnelly.

Back row, left to right:  Jason Chatfield, Heather Loase, Ellis Rosen, Johnny DiNapoli, Kendra Allenby, Bishakh Som, Tim Hamilton, Nick Downes, Andy Dubbin, Robert Leighton, Michael Maslin

And here’s James Stevenson’e entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time idea man, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson has long been a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He is a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s recent book, published in 2013, The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, is essential.

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The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (Yesterday’s & Today’s)

To bag or not to bag, by Lila Ash. Ms. Ash began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.

Teresa Burns Parkhurst on the work days before Thanksgiving. Ms. Parkhurst began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

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Meet The Cartoonist (1943): James Thurber

Another in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943

Thurber’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Thurber  Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

And for a lot more Thurber, go here.

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New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality

Read all about it here, and see the video! (that’s The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes — who wrote the script for the video — being Heimliched in the background by actress, Madeline Wise.

Gahan Wilson, Cartoon Great, Needs Our Help; The Weekend Spill: From Frank Modell’s Library: Introduction To Cartooning By Richard Taylor; Article Of Interest: Edward Koren; Barbara Shermund’s Marker; The Tilley Watch, September 23-27, 2019; Fave Photo Of The Weekend: Liza Donnelly & Jason Chatfield In Thurber’s Hometown

The Go Fund Me Campaign For Gahan Wilson

As most of you know, Gahan Wilson, one of the cartoon world’s greats, has been in need of assistance over this past year. A Go Fund Me effort set up by his step-son, Paul Winters is now back up to help with issues related to Gahan’s most recent difficulties. Read more here, and help if you can.

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From Frank Modell’s Library: Introduction To Cartooning By Richard Taylor

Among the signed cartoon books in the Spill‘s library, Frank Modell’s copy of Richard Taylor’s Introduction To Cartooning is a special favorite. It’s the only instructional book in our collection by a New Yorker cartoonist that belonged to a New Yorker cartoonist.

 

The book was published in 1947, the year after Mr. Modell began his long association with The New Yorker (as well as a contributor, he was, in his earliest years there, assistant to art editor James Geraghty).  What you see in Modell’s copy of Taylor’s book is what you see in many a textbook: essential passages underlined, circled, sometimes with arrows pointing out a word or two.  Many of the selections go to the heart of what it takes to be career cartoonist. Mr Modell learned his lessons well: he spent over half a century at The New Yorker, contributing well over a thousand drawings, as well as half a dozen covers.

Here are just a few pages from Taylor’s book with Modell’s marked passages.

And a nice surprise at the very end of the book on the inside cover, Modell added some sketches:

Richard Taylor’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Richard Taylor (self portrait from Meet the Artist) Born in Fort William, Ontario, Sept. 18, 1902. Died in 1970. NYer work: 1935 -1967. Collections: The Better Taylors ( Random House, 1944, and a reprint edition by World Publishing, 1945), Richard Taylor’s Wrong Bag (Simon & Schuster, 1961). Taylor also authored Introduction to Cartooning ( Watson-Guptill, 1947). From Taylor’s introduction: the “book is not intended to be a ‘course in cartooning’…instead, it attempts to outline a plan of study — something to be kept at the elbow to steer by.”

 

Frank Modell’s entry:

Frank Modell Born, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 6, 1917. Died, May 27, 2016, Guilford, Connecticut. New Yorker work: 1946–1997. Mr. Modell began his New Yorker career as assistant to the Art Editor, James Geraghty. He soon began contributing his cartoons (and cartoon ideas for others), with his first drawing appearing July 20, 1946. Besides his work for The New Yorker, he was a children’s book author and an actor (he appeared, most notably, in Woody Allen’s 1980 film, Stardust Memories). Key collection: Stop Trying To Cheer Me Up! (Dodd, Mead, 1978).

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Article Of Interest: Edward Koren

From The Manchester Journal, September 27, 2019, “‘Into The Wild’ With A Vermont Cartoonist; Ed Koren’s Drawings Explore The Funny Side Of The Rural-Urban Divide”.

Mr. Koren began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962. Visit his website here.

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Barbara Shermund’s Marker

Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery updates us on the grave marker for the great New Yorker artist Barbara Shermund.  Read here.

Ms. Shermund’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Barbara Shermund (self portrait, above) Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work).

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A  end of the week listing of the New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to the magazine’s Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Brendan Loper, Lila Ash, Evan Lian, and J.A.K.

Daily Shouts: Liana Finck

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Fave Photo Of the Weekend: Donnelly and Chatfield In Columbus, Ohio

Two New Yorker cartoonists ran into each other in James Thurber‘s Hometown of Columbus, Ohio.

Mr. Chatfield is attending the Cartoon Crossroads Columbus convention and Ms. Donnelly is there attending the AAEC 2019 Annual Convention.

 

 

The Weekend Spill: More And More MAD; Photo: Chatfield At A Snazzy Drawing Board; Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of July 22-26, 2019; A New Comics Journal Column; Interview Of Interest: Paul “How To Read Nancy” Karasik

 

More And More MAD

From The Daily Cartoonist, July 27, 2019,  “We’re All MAD Here  (Paeans To The Magazine)”

D.D. Degg gathers cartoonist MAD pieces.

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Chatfield At A Snazzy Drawing Board

Courtesy of Marcie Jacobs-Cole, this photo of Jason Chatfield at a drawing board at Dick Blick Art Supplies* last Thursday.

Mr. Chatfield began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

His website here.

*this isn’t a Spill commercial endorsement.

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A weekend roundup of the New Yorker cartoonists whose work appeared on newyorker.com‘s Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts

Daily Cartoon contributors this week: J.A.K., David Sipress, Barry Blitt, Ellis Rosen, and Brendan Loper.

Daily Shouts contributors this week: Roz Chast (in her recurring Cut & Paste series), Farley Katz (in his recurring Cooking Cartoonist series), and Julia Wertz.

See all of the above, and more, here.

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A New Comics Journal Column/Columnist

There’s almost nothing the Spill likes more than a site that leads to other sites — and now there’s a new one.  From The Comics Journal, July 26, 2019, “You Build Walls, We’re Gonna Probably Dig Holes (This Week’s Links)”this new column of “links relating…to comics” by Ryan Flanders, who told us in his recent TCJ article about MAD, that he “was a member of the MAD Art Department, though my roles spilled into editorial, talent scouting and the amorphous responsibility of ‘coming up with new ideas.'”  You’ll find a sprinkle or two of New Yorker cartoonists mentioned in this first column.

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Interview Of Interest: Paul “How To Read Nancy” Karasik

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From The LA Review of Books, July 27, 2019, “It Takes A Deep Reading. and an Obsession: An Interview With Paul Karasik.”

Mr. Karasik began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

 

 

The Weekend Spill: A MAD New Yorker Cartoonist: Jason Chatfield; A MAD Facebook Group Of Interest; Interview: Victoria Roberts; Summer Of 1930 Via A New Yorker State Of Mind; A New York Times MAD Op-Ed

A MAD New Yorker Cartoonist

Jason Chatfield, a MAD cartoonist, has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Read his Medium piece posted yesterday:  “World MAD As Cartoonists Get Rubbed Out”

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A MAD Facebook Group Of Interest

The Facebook group, MAD Mumblings, seems like a good place to keep in touch with current MAD events.  A number of contributors belong.

(the accompanying Save MAD Magazine graphic seen here credited to Chet Jasper Reams)

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Article Of Interest: Victoria Roberts 

From Atencion: San Miguel, “Working For The New Yorker: An Interview With Cartoonist Victoria Roberts”

— Ms. Roberts began contributing to The New Yorker in 1988.

Visit her website here.

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A New Yorker State Of Mind

Return to the summer of 1930 via A New Yorker State of Mind‘s deep dive into the July 4th & 12th issues of that year.  Lots of cartoons, of course, and so much more.

Cover above left by Alajalov, and above right by Julian de Miskey.

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A New York Times MAD Op-Ed

From The New York Times, July 12, 2019, an op-ed piece by Tim Krieder, “The World According To Mad Magazine”

( MAD Magazine pieces are being posted here in recognition of its relationship to so many New Yorker cartoonists, past and present, and because it’s MAD Magazine).

 

Art Spiegelman Event Of Interest; Article/Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly; Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon; The Surreal McCoy’s Wolf Of Baghdad Kickstarter at 75%!; And Over On Medium…

Art Spiegelman Event Of Interest

This September at The Rockwell Museum in Corning, New York: “An Evening With Art Spiegelman” — all the details here.

Mr. Spiegelman began contributing to The New Yorker in 1992. His Wikipedia entry here.

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Article/Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly

From Silicon Republic, June 23, 2019, “How This Cartoonist Draws Inspiration From Disruption” 

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982. Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

J.A.K. with a phone alert Daily. See it here. Mr. K began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

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The Surreal McCoy’s Wolf Of Baghdad Kickstarter At 75%

The Surreal McCoy, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014, reports that the Kickstarter campaign for her “Wolf Of Baghdad” soundtrack is up to 75%.  To read more about this and contribute, go here

Ms. McCoy writes:  Here’s a short video by 3yin’s founder and bandleader Daniel Jonas to give a taste of the repertoire that we hope to be recording. The song is called Shams esh-Shamousa (Beautiful Sun) and is the Iraqi version of a traditional Arabic folk tune:

It rises, how beautiful is its light/The sun, precious sun/Come on, let’s go and milk the buffalo/It rose over the river Tigris/A gentle breeze blew from the west/ The waves call out ‘Hello!’/And send the sun their greetings.

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And Over On Medium…

An alert from Medium about Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell’s latest post reminded me to note here that it’s an interesting place to see non-New Yorker work by New Yorker artists you might not see elsewhere.

 Some for instances (no links: you’ll have to search on Medium‘s site for these):