Tonight! Art Out Loud Online Society Of Illustrators Event W/ Liza Donnelly; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Chatfield Live!; More Spills: Grant Snider & J.A.K…More About MAD’s Jaffee

Tonight at 6 watch long-time New Yorker cartoonist Liza Donnelly draw live as part of the Society of Illustrators Art Out Loud Online series.  Info here.

Ms. Donnelly’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Liza Donnelly Born, Washington, D.C. New Yorker work: June 21, 1982 – Key book: Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Edited:  Sex & Sensibility: Ten Women Examine the Lunacy of Modern Love…in 200 Cartoons ( Twelve, 2008). Co-authored with Michael Maslin: Husbands & Wives ( Ballantine 1995), Call Me When You Reach Nirvana ( Andrew & McMeel, 1995), Cartoon Marriage ( with Michael Maslin) (Random House, 2009), When Do They Serve the Wine?( Chronicle, 2010). Women On Men (Narrative Library, 2013). Donnelly also wrote and illustrated a popular series of dinosaur books for children ( Dinosaur Day, Dinosaur Beach, Dinosaur Halloween, etc.) all published by Scholastic.  She is the CBS News Resident Cartoonist. Website: http://www.lizadonnelly.com

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

We’re being watched by Drew Panckeri, who began contributing to The New Yorker in April of 2015.

 

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Chatfield Live!

From The Daily Cartoonist, June 15, 2020,  “Wacom Sponsors Webinar Featuring Jason Chatfield and Ed Steckley”

Mr. Chatfield began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

Visit his website here.

 

 

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…J.A.K’s about to released book & Grant Snider’s get noticed by The New York Times. Read here.

…Speaking of The New York Times, here’s a piece about MAD‘s just retired Al Jaffee and the issue of MAD celebrating his career.

 

The Wednesday Watch; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Article Of Interest On J.A.K.

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A newbie to newyorker.com, Hilary Allison, with a crisis goal.

 

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Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Caitlin Cass, who began contributing to The New Yorker in August of 2018: “Some Causes Of Pandemic-Related Video Conflict”

 

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From Vice, April 29, 2020, “How Having OCD During A Pandemic Is Not A Superpower” — this piece on J.A.K. and his forthcoming book, Everything Is An Emergency.

Mr. K. began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

The Latest American Bystander; Jason Chatfield’s Covid-19 Diary; Daily Cartoon & Daily Shouts Cartoonists (Yesterday’s & Today’s)…And Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

The latest American Bystander (March 2020) has landed on my desk —  it’s a treat!  Here are The New Yorker cartoonists whose contributions you’ll find in the issue (and in the case of John Cuneo, on the issue’s cover):

George Booth (besides a full-page Booth drawing there’s a lovely photo of Mr. Booth on the very last page), Roz Chast (a two-page spread of her cartoons), Sam Gross (in “Sam’s Spot”, a regular Bystander feature), Peter Kuper, David Ostow, Ali Solomon, Rich Sparks, Cerise Zelenetz, and P.S. Mueller.

A bonus in every issue — I see it as a bonus anyway — are the numerous full page ads for books by cartoonists (no surprise, I’m particularly fond of the books by New Yorker contributors). In this issue we see an ad for Rich Spark’s cartoon collection, Love And Other Weird Things, Ben Katchor’s The Dairy Restaurant, Robert Grossman’s Life On The Moon, Roz Chast’s & Patty Marx’s You Can Only Yell At Me For One Thing At A Time, Peter Kuper’s adaptation of Joseph Conrad’s Heart Of Darkness, and John Donohue’s All The Restaurants In New York.

Go here to the Bystander‘s website to order a copy and/or subscribe.

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Jason Chatfield’s Covid-19 Diary

The New Yorker cartoonist Jason Chatfield draws and writes about his recent experience with the “invisible enemy.”  So very glad to hear he and his wife have fully recovered. 

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Daily Cartoonists & Daily Shouts Cartoonists (Yesterday’s & Today’s)…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

Today’s Daily cartoonist & cartoon: J.A.K. on who’s speaking. Mr. K. began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

Two Daily Shouts Cartoonists Today:

  1. Ali Fitzgerald: “America!: Dr. Fauci Reads A Bedtime Story To Anxious Adults”

2. Emily Flake: “Homeschool Spirit Week!”

Yesterday’s Daily cartoonist:  Emily Flake, who began contributing in 2008. Audio Flake: this from Gil Roth’s Virtual Memories podcast.

Yesterday’s Daily Shouts cartoonist: Zoe Si’s “Substitutions In The Time Of Quarantine, Rated”

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Our President Concocts A Cure For The Coronavirus”

Interview Of Interest: J.A.K.; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Yesterday’s; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Tim Hamilton Is This Month’s Comics Journal Diarist

Interview Of Interest: Jason Adam Katzenstein

From Sunday Morning Stories, April 20, 2020, “Jason Adam Katzenstein On Brooklyn, Roasting Chickens, and ‘War & Peace'”

Mr. K began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2014.  His latest book, Everything Is An Emergency: An OCD Story In Words & Pictures, is out June 30th.

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 Daily Cartoonists & Cartoons

Yesterday: Maddie Dai on decluttering. Ms. Dai began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

Today: Cerise Zelenetz (a newyorker.com contributor) on the need to wipe down Cinderella’s shoe.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Zoe Si gives us “Substitutions In The Time Of Quarantine, Rated”

— Ms. Zi began contributing to The New Yorker this past February

 

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Tim Hamilton Is This Month’s Comics Journal Diarist.

Mr. Hamilton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

Read his entries here.

 

Visit his website here.

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 20, 2020

A Note To Readers: Due to the times we’re in the digital edition of the magazine appears later in the day than usual. Thus, instead of the usual look through the magazine, I’m working off of the slide show of cartoons on newyorker.com, as well as the cover Q&A found there. If any mistakes are made on my part I’ll correct them once the digital issue is posted.

Update: 1:00pm.  Digital issue posted about an hour ago.

The Cover: Owen Smith gives us a tired worker (the piece is titled — and again, why do we need cover titles? —  “After The Shift”)…four out of the last five covers have been corona virus themed. Read about the cover here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

I don’t know how others respond to an issue’s cartoons. For me, it’s always at least a two-level response:

1. How each drawing hits me — did a drawing stand out (for better or worse).

2. The feeling from all the drawings combined: was it a strong issue of work, or not.

This new issue feels strong, covering a wide range of territory in cartoonland, from aliens (courtesy of Charlie Hankin) to a PC Satyr (from Edward Koren), from dolphins in a swimming pool (McPhail), to what might be found on the other side of the mountaintop (Colin Tom)… and so much more.

 

The Rea Irvin Masthead Watch:

Rea Irvin, the fellow shown here, did so much to shape the look of The New Yorker (okay, I’ll say it — he was instrumental). One of his greatest lasting contributions was adapting Allen Lewis’s typeface; it eventually became known as the Irvin typeface, although these days I hear it   referred to as the New Yorker typeface.  Among Irvin’s many contributions other than art supervisor to Harold Ross (in itself a huge contribution!) was contributing covers, including, of course, the very first one, featuring Eustace Tilley. He also contributed cartoons, and headings for various departments. His design for Talk Of The Town stood in place (with a few adjustments in the magazine’s earliest days) for 92 years, until May of 2017 when his iconic design was mothballed and replaced by a redraw.

Am I wrong to think of Irvin’s typeface, his Tilley, his Talk masthead, and his “catholic” taste in cartoon selection as representing the graphic soul of the magazine?  So many modern changes (or “tweaks” as they were referred to) were test ballooned in recent years and then withdrawn (layout, typography, headings, etc., etc.) —  why not bring back this not insignificant bit of soul.