Blitt Pencilled; The Tilley Watch…with Mankoff, Eckstein, Flake, Steed & Allenby

tumblr_inline_oc0iv7UAkQ1sj0qh6_500Barry Blitt is the next New Yorker artist sharing the tools of his trade on Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog, A Case For Pencils. Read it here.

 

 

 

 

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Tilley Watch...

“New Yorker Cartoons Past, Present and Future” a talk by Bob Mankoff, the New Yorker‘s Cartoon Editor will take place at The Museum of The City of New York on September 8th.  All the details here

 

…another cartoonist makes their New Yorker debut in this week’s issue. Kendra Allenby, whose previous work can be found here, is in the issue of August 22. Ms. Allenby is either the 9th or 10th new cartoonist (one of these days I’ll be more definitive) added to the magazine’s stable in the past eight months…

And in case you missed these: Edward Steed’s newyorker.com piece on his travels in ChinaEmily Flake’s  newyorker.com piece on NYC’s L Train closure…and Bob Eckstein’s  illustrations

in the New York Times accompanying the piece “Which Olympic Sport Would You Compete In?”.

 

Lee Lorenz’s 1993 Donald Cartoon Most-liked on New Yorker’s New Cartoon Instagram Account; Sara Lautman Pencilled

NewYorkerDonaldDuckA New Yorker drawing from 1993 by the magazine’s former Art Editor/Cartoon Editor, Lee Lorenz has, so far,  gathered the most likes on the magazine’s brand spanking new Instagram account. Read more here on Adweek.com”s FishbowlNY.

Below: Mr. Lorenz’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z” entry.

 

Lee Lorenz ( Pictured above. Photograph taken 1995 by Liza Donnelly) *Born 1932, Hackensack, NJ. Lorenz was the art editor of The New Yorker from 1973 to 1993 and its cartoon editor until 1997. During his tenure, a new wave of New Yorker cartoonists began appearing in the magazine — cartoonists who no longer depended on idea men. Cartoon collections: Here It Comes (Bobbs-Merrrill Co., Inc. 1968) ; Now Look What You’ve Done! (Pantheon, 1977) ; The Golden Age of Trash ( Chronicle Books, 1987); The Essential series, all published by Workman: : Booth (pub: 1998), Barsotti ( pub: 1998), Ziegler (pub: 2001), The Art of The New Yorker 1925 -1995, (Knopf, 1995), The World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998). NYer work: 1958 – .

________________________________________________________________________________________

tumblr_inline_oban9vjWeo1sj0qh6_500

Sara Lautman, a new addition to The New Yorker‘s stable of cartoonists,   is next up on Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog, A Case For Pencils. See her entry here.

 

 

 

Mick Stevens Pencilled

Mick Stevenstumblr_inline_o9fzp3rl351sj0qh6_500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mick Stevens is  next in a very long line of New Yorker cartoonists sharing their tools of the trade on Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog, A Case For Pencils.

See it here.

[above & below: Mr. Stevens, and his very first New Yorker cartoon, published December 17, 1979]

Panckeri Pencilled; More Gus Mager

tumblr_inline_o82aqwXtD21sj0qh6_500Drew Panckeri is up next on Jane Mattimoe’s terrif blog, A Case For Pencils.

Read all about Mr. Panckeri’s tools of the trade here.

 

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________

 

mager19060930-WHat-Little-Johnny-Wanted-650x424From The Comics Journal, June 1, 2016, here’s “The Lost Sundays of Gus Mager 1904-1906”, Part 2 of Paul Tumey’s close look at the artist’s work.

 

 

 

 

 

As a reminder of Mr. Mager’s New Yorker connection, here’s  Ink Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z” entry for him:

Gus Mager (photo above) Born, 1878, Newark, New Jersey. Died, July 17, 1956, Murrysville, Penn. NYer work: 5 cartoons, March – July of 1925. It should be noted that a character named “Groucho” in Mr. Mager’s “Monk Family” comic strip was the inspiration for Julius Marx’s stage name, “Groucho.” Read more about it here