Roz Chast Looks For A Pen; Tomorrow Night’s Book Signing of Interest: Marcellus Hall; Exhibit of Interest: Addams, Chon Day, Gahan Wilson, John Held Jr., Kunz, Jonik, Eckstein, Caldwell & More; Sarah Boxer in The Atlantic: “Why Is Trump So Hard to Caricature?”

Roz Chast Looks For a Pen

A fun post on Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils blog: Roz Chast is asking for pen suggestions.  Read it here.

Note: Ms. Chast (along with the cover artist, Liniers, and several others) is a guest of honor at the upcoming MOCCA Festival at the Society of Illustrators. Info here.

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Tomorrow Night’s Book Signing of Interest: Marcellus Hall

This notice from the illustrator & New Yorker cover artist, Marcellus Hall:

This Thursday I’ll be at Desert Island Comics 6:50-9pm signing and selling my debut graphic novel, KALEIDOSCOPE CITY. During the first 45 minutes or so Ambrosia Parsley will join me as I sing a few songs and Gabe Soria will interview me. Come!
Marcellus
 
THURS MAR 15
DESERT ISLAND COMICS
540 Metropolitan
Williamsburg Brooklyn NY
6:50 – 9pm
FREE
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Exhibit of Interest: Sordoni Art Gallery At Wilkes University
 
News of an exhibit featuring a number of New Yorker contributors including Charles Addams, Chon Day, John Held, Jr. Bob Eckstein, John Caldwell, John Jonik, Anita Kunz, and Gahan Wilson.  Info here.
Below, the artists in the show:
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Sarah Boxer in The Atlantic: “Why Is Trump So Hard to Caricature?”
 
A fascinating article by Ms. Boxer.  It includes a number of New Yorker artists. Read it here.

 

Surreal McCoy Pencilled; Even More E. Simms Campbell

Surreal McCoy Pencilled

A Case For Pencils, Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog offering a peek into New Yorker cartoonists tool bags, continues with The Surreal McCoy.  Read it here!

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Even More E. Simms Campbell

Attempted Bloggery continues its Campbell fest with a look at original art from Playboy See it here!

(Above: Mr. Campbell’s one & only New Yorker cover)

Mr. Campbell’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

E. Simms Campbell (photo above) Born, 1906. Died, 1971. New Yorker work: 1932 -1942. Key collections: Cuties in Arms (1943) – the earliest published collection of cartoons by an African-American cartoonist); More Cuties in Arms (also 1943); and Chorus of Cuties (1953)

 

Exhibit of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist Lorenzo Mattotti; Brendan Loper Pencilled

Exhibit of Interest: Lorenzo Mattotti

From the Italian Cultural Institute’s website:

“…the exhibition presents for the first time the original pastels created by the artist for 32 of the magazine’s covers. Also included are unpublished preparatory sketches and a selection of Mattotti’s illustrations for articles on fashion, culture and current affairs.”

Link here for info.

Article of interest: from newyorker.com, February 6, 2018 by the magazine’s cover editor, Francoise Mouly: “An Exhibit Of Lorenzo Mattotti’s Covers For The New Yorker” 

Mr. Mattotti’s blog.

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Brendan Loper Pencilled

Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils returns with the spotlight on New Yorker cartoonist Brendan Loper’s tools of the trade.  Read it here!

 

 

 

Fave Photo of the Day; Appearance of Interest: Robert Grossman; Pond Pencilled; PR: Chast, Ware

Fave Photo of the Day

Courtesy of New Yorker cartoonist colleague, Jeremy Nguyen, this photo taken last Monday of a cartoon event at Brooks Brothers.  Beginning at the bottom ‘o’ the stairs and heading up: Emma Allen, the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, and cartoonists Drew Dernavich, Liana Finck, and Jason Adam Katzenstein (aka J.A.K.). And unless I’m mistaken, that’s the classic Brooks Brothers Vintage Bomber Jacket (in Khaki)* just behind Ms. Allen .

*unpaid advertisement

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Appearance of Interest: Robert Grossman

One of the greats, Robert Grossman, will appear at the New York Comics and Picture-Story Symposium on November 28th.  All the information here.

Mr. Grossman, widely known for his illustration, was, in the earliest stage of his career, an assistant to James Geraghty (the New Yorker art editor from 1939- 1973).  Mr. Grossman’s first New Yorker appearance (below) was published January 13, 1962.

 

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Pond Pencilled

Mimi Pond is the subject of Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils post wherein the cartoonist discusses her tools of the trade.  (above: Ms. Pond’s work area).   See the post here!

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…From Comics DC, November 12, 2017,  “Roz Chast, ‘Going To Town’ Recorded at Politics & Prose”

Here’s the video of Chris Ware’s appearance on The Charlie Rose Show. Mr. Ware is currently making the rounds promoting his new book, Monograph By Chris Ware (Rizzoli).

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 22: John Held, Jr.; More Booth!

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 22: John Held, Jr.

I know, I know… you woke up this morning wondering if John Held, Jr., who became famous for his drawings of flappers in and on the cover of the pre-Luce Life ever did advertising work.  Well courtesy of Warren Bernard‘s detective work, we have some examples of Mr. Held’s commercial work. My thanks to Mr. Bernard for sharing his findings with Ink Spill.

New Yorker readers who have dipped into the magazine’s cartoon anthologies or looked through ancient issues would certainly have come across Mr. Held’s work — but it wasn’t the style that brought him fame. His New Yorker work looks like this:

  Harold Ross, the New Yorker‘s founder and first editor (who met Held in high school when they both worked on the school newspaper,The Red and Black)  wanted Held in his new magazine, but he didn’t want Held’s famous flapper style work. According to Thomas Kunkel, in his magnificent biography of Ross, Genius in Disguise:

“Ross and [Rea] Irvin eschewed his [Held’s] overexposed flappers, instead publishing his contemporary twists on the Gay Nineties woodcuts Ross had loved as a boy.”

So what you see here are examples of Held’s non-New Yorker style. The Ovington Gift Shop ad was published during the heart of the Roaring 20s (1926), and the others were published in 1929 — the year that ended so badly.

Here’s John Held, Jr.’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

John Held, Jr. (Pictured above. Source: Sketchbook of American Humorists, 1938) Born, January 10, 1889, Salt Lake City, Utah. Died, 1958, Belmar, New Jersey. New Yorker work: April 11, 1925 – Sept. 17, 1932.

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More Booth!

Mike Lynch and Jane Mattimoe have posted pieces about the wonderful George Booth exhibit at The Society of Illustrators.  The exhibit, as you can see in the poster, is up now and will run through the end of this year. Do not miss!