National Cartoonists Society Best Gag Cartoonist nominees include Ziegler, Stevens, Chast and Gross

From The Daily Cartoonist“NCS announces 2012 division awards” — Four New Yorker cartoonists are nominated in the Gag Cartoon category: Jack Ziegler, Mick Stevens, Roz Chast and Sam Gross. Barry Blitt, a New Yorker contributor perhaps best known for his covers, is nominated in the category of Magazine Feature/Magazine illustration. Congratulations to all!

And for more on the National Cartoonists Society, link here to their website.

Cats get their due: Big New Yorker Book of Cats out in October; Gehr’s “Know Your New Yorker Cartoonist” interviews collected in book form

Following in the paw prints of The Big New Yorker Book of Dogs is The Big New Yorker Book of Cats (Random House, October 1, 2013). Anthony Lane, Calvin Trillin and M.F.K. Fisher are listed as among the contributors. And of course, there’ll be cartoons.

 

We’ll have to wait a while — til December, to be exact, for Richard Gehr’s “Know Your New Yorker Cartoonist” series of interviews to be in book form. Amazon has recently listed Gehr’s  For A Minute There It Suddenly All Made Sense!: Behind the Scenes with The New Yorker’s Most Brilliantly Twisted Cartoonists.

Published by New Harvest, the book has a pub date of December 3, 2013.  From the publisher’s  promotional material:

Gehr’s book features fascinating biographical profiles of such artists as Gahan Wilson, Sam Gross, Roz Chast, Lee Lorenz, and Edward Koren. Along with a dozen such profiles, Gehr provides a brief history of The New Yorker cartoon itself, touching on the lives and work of earlier illustrating wits—including Charles Addams, James Thurber, and William Steig.

The Algonquin

 

The  holiday season reminds me of the Algonquin Hotel, and once reminded I only have to look across my desk to the snowglobe pictured above.  It was given to me years ago by friends who stayed at the hotel for a day or two.

 

I threw together the little scene above for Ink Spillers. The snowglobe sits atop Margaret Case Harriman’s Vicious Circle: The Story of The Algonquin Roundtable (Rinehart & Co., Inc., 1951.  Illustrated by the late great Al Hirschfeld). Behind the globe is Frank Case’s Tales Of A Wayward Inn (Garden City Publishing, Inc., 1941. With seven illustrations, including one by James Thurber and another by Covarrubias ). My thanks to Jack Ziegler for adding Wayward Inn  to our collection many moons ago. The Empire State Building and Chrysler Building are Times Square souvenirs. I found the tin Yellow Cab someplace years ago.  There’s a sign on the trunk:  “Always Be Careful Crossing Streets” — excellent advice then and now.

 

The mention of the Algonquin brings to mind a flood some of the biggest and brightest names associated with the earliest and earlier years of The New Yorker: Harold Ross, Dorothy Parker, Alexander Woollcott, Benchley, E.B. White, and Thurber, who made the place his second home when he wasn’t at his “great good place” in Connecticut.  It was in the Algonquin lobby that Thurber and another of the magazine’s giants, Peter Arno, met for the last time just before Thurber’s death.  And of course it was where William Shawn went for his cereal and orange juice lunch every week day during his long tenure as editor.

 

For those wanting much more on the Algonguin and its part in The New Yorker’s story, there are the books in the photo (Frank Case owned the Algonguin), as well as Thomas Kunkel’s terrific biography of Harold Ross, Genius in Disguise (Random House, 1995). There are plenty of other books with tales of the Algonquin — too many to mention at the moment. I will however note a few more books that go right to the heart of the matter:

Wit’s End: Days and Nights  of the Algonquin Round Table by James R. Gaines (Booksurge Publishing, 2007)

The Algonquin Wits Edited by Robert E. Drennan (The Citadel Press, 1985)

The Lost Algonquin Round Table Edited by Nat Benchley and Kevin C. Fitzpatrick (iUniverse, Inc., 2009)

Politics reigns in New Yorker’s Cartoon Issue.

 

Out now: The 2012 New Yorker Cartoon Issue.  This is the 15th year the Cartoon Issue has appeared. That first issue, dated December 15, 1997, featured a cover collage of cartoonists’ work, a fold out Arnold Newman photograph of forty-one of the magazine’s cartoonists and one of my all-time favorite Jack Ziegler cartoons (it appeared in the Comment section). Also in that issue, under the heading Cartoonists was an alphabetical list of and mini-bio for each artist. If you don’t have a copy, it’s well worth seeking out.

The latest installment features a politically themed cover by Roz Chast (her 2nd Cartoon Issue cover, her first appeared in 1999). This Cartoon Issue veers from its predecessors in that its cover, cartoons and cartoon spreads are predominantly politically themed.

One non-political full page stands out:  Joe Dator’s “How We Do It” A week in the life of a New Yorker Cartoonist. Of note: Aline & R. Crumb reappear (Mr. Crumb made news in 2010 when he said he’d “never work for The New Yorker again”). Also of note: Andy Friedman, whose cartoons hitherto appeared in the magazine under the pseudonym Larry Hat (his New Yorker illustrations appear under his own name), appears here under his own name.

 

Here’s a full rundown of the cartoonists (and, in one case, a cartoon collaborator) featured in the issue:

Cover: Roz Chast

Spreads and full pages: Aline & R. Crumb, Joe Dator, Alex Gregory, Zachary Kanin, Ruben Bolling, Barry Blitt, Simon Rich & Farley Katz

Cartoons: Paul Karasik, Ariel Molvig, Barbara Smaller, Tom Toro, Andy Friedman, Joe Dator, Charles Barsotti, Lee Lorenz, Liam Francis Walsh, William Haefeli, John O’Brien, Danny Shanahan, Bruce Eric Kaplan, Zachary Kanin, Michael Crawford, Frank Cotham, Christopher Weyant, Farley Katz, Kim Warp, Paul Noth,  Carolita Johnson