The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 27, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Farley Katz

The Cover: A standup paddle boarder in the shadow of The Brooklyn Bridge. Read about Malika Favre’s eighth New Yorker cover here. (if you go online you’ll see that the little paddleboarder’s been animated. What a world!)

The Cartoonists:

You’ll note New Yorker cover artist, John Cuneo’s name in the list, but this is the first time Mr. Cuneo’s name appears among the cartoonists — it’s his New Yorker cartoon debut. Mr. Cuneo is the 13th addition to the magazine’s cartoonist stable this year and the 39th new cartoonist added to the roster since Emma Allen was appointed cartoon editor in May of 2017. 

The Cartoons: Just for fun, as I did here a few weeks ago, I went back a number of years (40 this time) to this date and took a look at the issue’s cartoonists and cartoons. Here’s the line-up from the issue of May 28, 1979:

As with the last time I did this, the number of cartoonists in the back issue is double the number in the present issue (22 in 1979; 11 in 2019). But…as was the case last time, the back issue was far heftier in page count (128) than this latest issue (78), so proportionately, the cartoonists are holding their own, numbers-wise.  The 1979 issue does however feature a wonderful two-and-a- half page Steinberg spread (“Cousins”). 

The Illustrations: The 2019 issue contains 20 color illustrations, including 3 1/2 full page  illustrations. The 1979 issue contains 2 small b&w illustrations.

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A fun thing: The very first cartoon in the 1979 issue is by Jack Ziegler.  Coming across it this morning I remembered that Mr. Ziegler and I briefly discussed the drawing in the Spill‘s two-part 2016 Ziegler interview:

Michael Maslin: Here’s another far eastern themed drawing: Fleetwood Mac. I’ve always loved it because I never understood Fleetwood Mac.

Jack Ziegler: This was a much earlier Fleetwood Mac I was referring to, around the time they got mega platinum. I just needed the name of a band there.

MM: You just imagined this scene?

fleetwood-mac

JZ: Yeah, right. Almost everything I do is as far as the scene background settings – it’s all made up.

MM: What are those little things off to the left on the bottom.

JZ: Oh those are just little houses down the hill. What did you think they were?

[laughter]

MM: Structures of some kind – I just wanted to be sure.

(you can see all of Pt.1 here, and all of Pt. 2 here. The above is found in Pt. 2)

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Rea Irvin: and of course one major difference between the older issue and this week’s issue is that Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead was still in its usual spot in 1979. In 2019, the puzzling redraw of Mr. Irvin’s work continues its run. Read about these two designs here. Below: Irvin’s still a-missin’ and missed masthead.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Farley Katz delivers the post Game of Thrones Daily.  Mr. Katz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

 

 

 

 

Out Today: Ultimate Cartoon Book Of Book Cartoons; Interview Of Interest: Ed Steed; Podcast Of Interest: Mark Alan Stamaty Talks With Gil Roth; Flake’s Daily Shouts Piece; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Brendan Loper

It’s always a good day when a cartoon anthology is published. Today’s one of those days. The Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons, edited By Bob Eckstein and published by Princeton Architectural Press, is officially out today. Cover art by the great Sam Gross and cartoons by some of the New Yorker‘s greatest artists, including George Booth, Edward Koren and Jack Ziegler.  Here’s a brief interview with Mr. Eckstein about the collection.

                                           Below: the back cover, listing the contributors.

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Interview Of Interest: Ed Steed

  Richard Gehr, who gave us I Only Read It For The Cartoons (New Harvest, 2014) interviews Ed Steed (one of the contributors to the Ultimate Cartoon Book mentioned above). Mr. Steed began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013.  See some of his work here.

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Podcast Of Interest: Mark Alan Stamaty Talks With Gil Roth

From Gil Roth’s Virtual Memories Podcast, this conversation mostly centered around the 40th anniversary reissue of Mr. Stamaty’s MacDoodle Street, but there is a fleeting mention about his New Yorker work. Listen here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts

Beginning today, The Spill will note Daily Shouts pieces when the contributor is a New Yorker cartoonist.  First up: Emily Flake’s The Real Florida Man, posted early this morning.

Ms. Flake has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2008.  Link here to her website.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Today’s Daily: keeping secrets, Washington, D.C. style, courtesy of Brendan Loper. Mr. Loper has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016. You can see more of his work here.

The Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue Of April 1, 2019; MoCCA Fest Event Of Note: Mort Gerberg And Friends (Danny Shanahan, Marisa Acocella, Bob Eckstein, And Michael Maslin); Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Christopher Weyant; Today’s Bonus Daily Cartoonist: Barry Blitt

The Cover: it’s a treat to have Bruce McCall’s work back on the cover. You can read about it here (and see an early version of the cover).

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

And speaking of treats, here are some of this issue’s cartoons that especially caught my eye:

Chris Weyant’s plumbing drawing (p.52). It reminded me, in the best possible way, of Jack Ziegler’s classic 1980 drawing Plumbing Trouble of the Gods. Mr. Weyant has delivered a funny, perfectly handled drawing. 

And then there’s David Borchart’s terrific giraffe drawing (p. 66). Perhaps this is the start of something big? Giraffes have never been anywhere as popular as cats and dogs in the cartoon universe (Lars Kenseth has drawn a very funny pug(?) in his all-dog cartoon on page 35). 

Finally, what a blast to come upon George Booth’s drawing in this issue (it’s on page 59). It’s a sunny day when Mr. Booth’s work appears (it’s worth mentioning again here on the Spill that Mr. Booth is the subject of an in-progress documentary film).

Applause for all.

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There are several drawings in the issue that, for some, might require Googling. I’ve always been a believer in “getting” a drawing without assistance. If I don’t get it, I move on (or occasionally ask a friend for help).  Of course, not getting certain New Yorker cartoons is age-old.

A note: this week’s Talk section includes a Sketchpad (it features a color “illustration” by Emily Flake).  A usage reminiscent of the comic strips briefly brought in during the early 1990s under Tina Brown. The Brown era comic strips ran across the entire width of each page (i.e., 6 columns wide), whereas this Sketchpad is 4 columns wide. Below: an example of a strip from the past: a Victoria Roberts piece from the issue of March 28, 1994.

Finally, the beautiful Rea Irvin masthead continues to remain in storage — not even brought out  as some kind of tease for this April 1st issue.  Well, here it is below, as it will be weekly until it reappears in the magazine (I can dream, can’t I?). 

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MoCCA Fest Event Of Note: Mort Gerberg and Friends: Danny Shanahan, Marisa Acocella, and Bob Eckstein. Panel moderated by Michael Maslin

The upcoming Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art (otherwise known as MoCCA) will begin its 2019 Festival on April 6th. A number of New Yorker folks will be participating (and I will note them as the information becomes available). Here’s the announcement of one that just came into the Spill:

 

Mort Gerberg and Friends

 

Mort Gerberg broke into print with irreverent drawings in The Realist in the early ’60s. His social-justice-minded—and bitingly funny—cartoons subsequently appeared in magazines including The New Yorker, Playboy, and the Saturday Evening Post. As a reporter, he’s sketched historic scenes including the women’s marches of the ’60s and the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

He is currently the subject of a retrospective exhibit at the New-York Historical Society, and Fantagraphics Underground Press has recently published the retrospective book Mort Gerberg On the Scene: A 50-Year Cartoon Chronicle. Gerberg will discuss his work in a conversation with friends and colleagues, led by Michael Maslin (Inkspill, The New Yorker) and including New Yorker cartoonists Marisa Acocella, Bob Eckstein and Danny Shanahan.

Garamond Room / 3:00 pm, Saturday, April 6th

Link to MoCCA’s website here for more general info.

Photos above, l-r: Danny Shanahan, Marisa Acocella, and Bob Eckstein

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Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist & Bonus Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Christopher Weyant is today’s Daily Cartoonist.  You can see his (Trump) drawing here. 

Mr. Weyant began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998. Link to his website here.

And here’s Barry Blitt’s Bonus Daily cartoon  —  Trump-world-ish .

Mr. Blitt began contributing to The New Yorker in 1994.  Link to his website here.

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker March 18, 2019

The Cover: This is Malika Favre’s seventh cover for The New Yorker (according to the Contributors info on page 4). An exceptionally decorative cover for “The Style Issue”… Read more here

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A very Charles Addamsy David Sipress drawing this week (that’s a compliment, of course).

Cartoon placement on the page has been mentioned here numerous times: happy to say that seven (i.e., half) of the  cartoons in the issue were given breathing room. They look great.

Tom Cheney’s Hell’s Auditors cartoon especially caught my eye (it’s on page 29). I believe that this is the fourth time New Yorker cartoonists have specifically word-played with the Hell’s Angels “colors.” Jack Ziegler had two, this beauty, published in The New Yorker, February 27, 1989:

And an earlier one, published in The New Yorker, December 17, 1984:

And then there was this one by yours truly in the December 25th, 1995 issue of The New Yorker:

A quick search of The New Yorker‘s database shows over a hundred of its cartoons have incorporated a motorcycle.  Sometimes the bike and biker are bit players, and other times they’re the focus of the drawing.  An awful lot of the cartoons concern folks getting speeding tickets from a motorcycle cop (and many of them show the cop in-wait behind a billboard). 

There are a small number of cartoons with motorcyclists wearing colors, but the usage doesn’t include mention of the Hell’s Angels. Ed Arno’s motorcycle gang wearing jackets that read “Inflation Fighters” (published April 2, 1979) is one example. 

To return to the great Jack Ziegler for a moment, he used the Hell’s Angels colors once again, but left their name intact in this fabulous drawing published in The New Yorker, November 13, 2000:

A long long way from the subject of Hell’s Angels, for those interested in trivia: the first mention of a motorcycle cartoon in the New Yorker‘s database is Al Frueh’s cartoon in the February 13, 1926 issue.  The  second cartoon with a motorcycle in the picture was published December 7, 1929.  It set off a bit of a in-house squabble, but that’s a story for another time (the artist was Peter Arno).

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Lastly, still no sight of Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead. Read about it here, and see it below:

 

The Wednesday Tilley Watch: Parker, Gerberg, Chast, Donnelly & More…

Items of interest this mid-week:

Two reminders of upcoming events.

On January 29, the great illustrator Robert Andrew Parker (shown below), whose work has appeared numerous times in The New Yorker, will be featured at The New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium. Details here.

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On January 30th, Long-time cartoonist Mort Gerberg will be in conversation with The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen. The event is a celebration of Mr. Gerberg’s new book, On The Scene. Details here.





…From the west coast, news that a television series in in the works based on Roz Chast‘s highly acclaimed book, Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant?

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…and from the east coast here’s a CNN piece by Liza Donnelly on her recent live-drawing assignment at the Women’s March in Washington, D.C.

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…there’s a new installment in the New Yorker‘s celebrity cartoon caption video series, Caption That Cartoon. This time it’s Adam Conover putting the caption marker to paper (I urge the magazine to ID the cartoonists whose work appears on these videos. Until they do I’ll provide IDs). In this episode the cartoonists are (in order of appearance):

Mick Stevens, Victoria Roberts, Jack Ziegler, Michael Crawford, Drew Dernavich, yours truly, Will McPhail, Frank Cotham, and Tom Cheney.

Above: Adam Conover looks over a Mick Stevens drawing in this screen grab from the video