The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of August 27th, 2018

  Kadir Nelson‘s cover (a tribute to Aretha Franklin) was posted last week.  Not mentioned here at the time (but noted on the New Yorker‘s Table of Contents): the image was inspired by Charles W. White’s Folksinger. 

The new issue’s “Fall Preview” accounts for the abundance of arts ads and illustrations. 

The cartoons:

Now we’re talkin’: sixteen cartoons in this issue vs last week’s nine.  A number of the sixteen cartoons stand out for various reasons. Two of them (I won’t single them out) are beyond me. Not long ago I would’ve emailed Jack Ziegler to explain them to me. It was always comforting when Jack didn’t understand a drawing either. Often he’d respond with a variation of, “I don’t know what the hell it means.”

 Now for some others that stood out (these I understand): Seth Fleishman‘s mirror ball drawing cements his reputation as the New Yorker‘s mirror ball guy. Funny drawing. Also very funny: Joe Dator‘s “hunny” sniffing Pooh airport scenario. And then there’s David Borchart‘s sea-faring koala drawing. Oh my my my. I mentioned Jack Ziegler before. I think Jack would’ve loved these drawings — they’re wonderfully in his ballpark of way-out-there. A Spill round of applause.

A thought here about the placement of every cartoon in the issue: none seemed pressed for space, in need of breathing room. Victoria Roberts doctor’s office drawing (p.69) and Ellis Rosen‘s (p.42) are good examples. The reader can really enjoy the fine drawing going on in these pieces (and in others).

This issue includes the debut New Yorker cartoon by Caitlin Cass. Ms. Cass is the seventeenth new cartoonist brought in since cartoon editor, Emma Allen was appointed in the Spring of 2017. Ms. Cass’s style — mostly the way she handles faces — reminds me of a New Yorker cover artist from the Golden Age: Christina Malman.  Oddly enough, while looking through Ms. Malman’s twenty-four covers for the magazine I came across one (shown below) thematically linked to Ms. Cass’s drawing of children looking at art in a museum.

A final thought before Rea Irvin’s classic missing masthead shows up at the end of this post: I’m wondering if Emma Hunsinger‘s funny caption for her drawing on page 77 would’ve also worked if the word “aren’t” was “are”…and if that’s so — if it’s so how often it happens in cartoon captions that a word completely flipped can still work with the drawing. In this case, substituting “are” for “aren’t” would radically change the intent. Ms. Hunsinger’s use of the word “aren’t” suggests the parents are concerned their child’s behavior is unusual. By using “are” the parents would instead be hopeful that their child’s behavior might make for a viral video.

For the record, here is the list of cartoonists in this issue:

And now, as promised, the missing Irvin masthead.

 — See you next week

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of July 30, 2018

The early release Barry Blitt Trump flat-on-his-face cover (above, right) was mentioned here last week, so onward we go to the brand new issue.  Fifteen cartoons in the issue, eighteen illustrations.  With five of those illustrations full page, I’d say the magazine is most definitely in a new age of illustration (the old age was during Tina Brown’s reign as editor. She brought illustration, including photographs, big-time into the magazine). The magazine had a golden age of cartoons that began in the late 1930s and roughly extended into the early 1950s. A new age of sorts (golden, platinum, silver — does it really matter?) began in the late 1960s, early 1970s and lasted several decades. I wouldn’t put a label on the age we’re in now because we’re in it (kind’ve a can’t see the forest for the trees thing).  

Three cartoons really stand out for me in this issue:

Kim Warp’s Dog Watching A Guy Grill Burgers Cartoon

I immediately saw a good bit of Jack Ziegler’s work in Ms. Warp’s wonderful cartoon.  The burgers, of course (see Mr. Ziegler’s classic collection: Hamburger Madness) as well as the situation of the guy grilling on the deck.  And then there’s the deck itself, with the deck boards so well delineated. Mr. Ziegler loved that kind of detail. The dog’s thought balloon also recalls Ziegler’s work as does the wording.  What’s so great is that while the drawing has its Ziegleresque elements and a Ziegleresque feel to it, it’s 1000% Warp. I asked Ms. Warp if her drawing was in any way Ziegler inspired and she replied in an email:

In some way it was inspired by Jack Ziegler’s food/BBQ cartoons as I loved his work and they are in my brain forever. I was thinking of our dog, Maggie, who always has an eye out for spills, and somehow the Ziegler vibe came through. I think it sold partly because of the word ‘bungle’ which they said they hadn’t seen in a while. It comes up in my life all the time.

Joe Dator’s “…rock-based content” Cartoon

Mr. Dator’s work continues to fascinate. You can just see how much he enjoys drawing his world. I especially like his attention to detail in this drawing: the lighting, the instruments…geez, it’s all clicking.

 Danny Shanahan’s Excellent Jack-and-the-Beanstalk Cartoon

Mr. Shanahan’s giants drawing is solid work, an evergreen. Seeing a drawing that works as well as this reminds me of what someone said about the difference between Fred Astaire’s and Gene Kelly’s dancing: with Kelly, you see the sweat.  In cartoonville, I’d rather not be distracted by seeing the sweat. With Shanahan, you don’t see the sweat. I asked Mr. Shanahan if there’s anything we should know about this drawing, and he replied via email:

No real interesting back story, other than that I was a bit disappointed when it wasn’t run fairly quickly after being purchased (the week of 6/28/2016!), because I thought that it might lose its topicality. No such luck- some gifts just keep on giving.
 

Of Further Interest

In this issue is a Talk piece by the magazine’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, who went to a cartoonists lunch and spoke with the lunching cartoonists as well as “crasher” Gus Van Sant (his new movie is based on a memoir by the cartoonist, John Callahan). I’m searching my memory bank now to recall the last time a New Yorker cartoon editor showed up at a cartoonists lunch. It was a very very long time ago, perhaps as long ago as the James Geraghty years (he was the art editor from 1939- 1973).

Some paperwork: Elisabeth McNair‘s work debuts in this week’s New Yorker.  Ms. McNair is the 14th cartoonist to be brought in by Emma Allen since she took up the position of cartoon editor in May of 2017.

For the record, the 14 are (with their debut issue alongside their name):

1. Sharon Levy (July 10, 2017)

2. Joseph Dottini (October 16, 2017)

3. Jon Adams (October 16, 2017)

4. Sophia Wiedeman (October 16, 2017)

5. Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell (November 20, 2017)

6. Emma Hunsinger (November 27, 2017)

7. Sophia Warren (November 27, 2017)

8. Maggie Mull  (December 11, 2017)

9. Mary Lawton (December 11, 2017)

10. Pia Guerra (December 18, 2017)

11. Julia Bernhard  (January 1, 2018)

12. Navied Mahdavian (February 26, 2018)

13. Bishakh Som (March 19, 2018)

14. Elisabeth McNair (July 30, 2018)

Rea Irvin’s Talk Masthead

Before this post wraps up, I’d like to bring in a guest, David Ochsner. Mr. Ochsner, the fellow behind A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker Magazine, has graciously allowed the Spill to run his findings about the changes to Rea Irvin’s Talk Of The Town masthead over the years. As regular visitors to the Monday Tilley Watch know, there’s a weekly nod to Mr. Irvin’s Talk masthead due to its having been dismayingly eighty-sixed in May of 2017 for a redrawn version by Christoph Niemann (his redraw appears all the way at the bottom right below — you can read about it here).

Here’s Mr. Ochsner:

The first change I noticed was six months after the magazine launched (Aug. 22, 1925), when the masthead lost some of its shading and some shadow structures were introduced in the foreground. A week later Woollcott was dropped from the masthead and replaced by Hugh Wiley. The following January the editors’ names were dropped altogether. On Jan. 30, 1926, the letters were enlarged and superimposed over the buildings, which rose up on the notched, curving line that Irvin introduced. Then 54+ years later, in 1980, the letters shifted to the right, the “K” rather than the “E” now superimposed over the tower (to accommodate the re-drawing or standardization of the Irvin font–most noticeable is the serif clipped from the “N”). 

— Til next week

 

A Price Playbill; Ziegler’s Letterman Appearance; A Couple of Hokinson Dachshunds

A Price Playbill

Without generous donors, the Spill‘s archives would be so much poorer.  Here’s the latest addition: a Playbill with cover art by the great George Price. Stalag 17 premiered at the 48th St. Theatre in May of 1951.  Mr. Price’s work, as a spot artist, premiered in The New Yorker in 1929. In his book, The Art of The New Yorker: 1925-1995, Lee Lorenz, the magazine’s former Art/Cartoon editor (who called Price one of the magazine’s great stylists, along with Helen Hokinson, Peter Arno, William Steig, and James Thurber) described Price’s transition from spot artist to cartoonist:

 After purchasing a few spot drawings from Price, Katharine White invited him in for an interview. She encouraged him to try his hand at cartooning. George was reluctant at first.  He was not an idea person. Mrs. White promised to supply him with gag writers, and on this condition George was persuaded  to begin submitting to the magazine.

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Ziegler’s Letterman Appearance

I’ve linked to this video before, but just happened to see it again last night.  Broadcast June 20, 1983, here’s the late very great Jack Ziegler’s Late Night with David Letterman appearance.  See it here.

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A Couple of Hokinson Dachshunds

I didn’t know that dachshunds were at one time called “liberty hounds” — did you?  Read more  here on Attempted Bloggery about a 1947 Helen Hokinson drawing featuring two of them.

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The (double) New Yorker Issue of July 9 & 16, 2018

A dog in a flotation device on a very watery cover for a double issue in early-to-mid July. The artist Mark Ulriksen talks about his creation here.  My eye wants me to believe that Mr. Ulriksen’s doggie is floating in the air above the surface of marbeilized water.

A delayed Monday Tilley Watch as the digital issue has not yet turned over to July 9th & 16th (it’s still stuck on the issue of July 2nd). The Monday Watch came about because I thought it might be fun taking a look at the cartoons in situ. Without the digital issue today, that’s not possible (my print version won’t arrive for a few more days).

I can see all the cartoons on the newyorker.com slideshow, but for me, that’s less appealing than seeing how they reside on the magazine’s pages. I also love seeing what else is going on in the issue, graphically (such as: has Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead returned yet…you know, things like that).

— So long then, until I have access to the magazine, in one version or another. 

…the latest issue appeared online late Monday afternoon. 

Twelve cartoons in the issue.  Here’re the cartoonists:

Bruce Kaplan’s caption caught my eye this week, as well as his somewhat complex drawing.  Also catching my eye: the number of illustrations (drawings and photographs). There are eighteen with four of them full page (and one of those actually a page-and-a-half).

Usually I don’t mention the cartoon caption page, but I do like Joe Dator’s kites offered up this week. It has a Jack Ziegler feel to it. Perhaps Mr. Dator will reveal his caption (if there was one) once the contest is settled.

Of special note: a nice Charles Addams piece by the cartoonist, Paul Karasik (it appears under the “Sketchbook” heading).

For more on the issue’s cartoons check out the Cartoon Companion at week’s end.

Extra special note: Rea Irvin’s classic masthead is still missing. Here’s what it looks like:

— See you when the next new issue is out, July 16th…seems like a long way off!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Too Darn Hot; Fave Photos of the Day: Chast & Wertz…Shanahan, Toro & Ziegler

Here’s a Liza Donnelly classic cartoon from The New Yorker issue of August 7, 1995:

And a favorite Charles Addams cover:

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Fave Photos of the Day: Roz Chast & Julia Wertz…Shanahan, Toro & Ziegler

Julia Wertz (on the left) and Roz Chast appeared at The New York Public Library last Thursday to discuss their work. I love that Ms. Chast is looking at a projected childhood photo of herself.  (photo courtesy of Marcie Jacobs-Cole). 

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And just last night up in Bennington, Vermont, Jessica Ziegler, the daughter of the late Jack Ziegler moderated a talk with Danny Shanahan and Tom Toro.  The photo below from an interesting article posted today by Mike Peterson on his Comic Strip of the Day. Mr. Shanahan is on the far left, Mr. Toro, center, and Ms. Ziegler far right.

 

 

 

 

The Wednesday Tilley Watch: Roz Chast, Julia Wertz in New York; Edward Koren, Danny Shanahan, Tom Toro, & Co. in Bennington, Vermont

A day of reminders on the Spill:

If you’re in or around Manhattan today, Roz Chast (above, far right) and Julia Wertz (far left) are in conversation at the New York Public Library this evening at 6:30. All the info here.

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Edward Koren, Danny Shanahan, Tom Toro in Vermont

And if you’re somewhere in the vicinity of Bennington this Saturday it’s New Yorker cartoons and cartoonists practically all day long at Southern Vermont College. A highlight of the day: Jessica Ziegler, daughter of the late very great New Yorker cartoonist, Jack Ziegler, will moderate a panel consisting of New Yorker cartoon god, Edward Koren (above left),veteran New Yorker cartoonist Danny Shanahan (above, middle), and the fab Tom Toro (above, right).  You’ll find other New Yorker cartoonists attending events as well.  Info here.