Liza Donnelly Returns To Oscar’s Red Carpet; A New Yorker State Of Mind: Thurber’s First New Yorker Drawing; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of February 3-7, 2020

Liza Donnelly Returns To Oscar’s Red Carpet

Liza Donnelly will be back on Oscar’s Red Carpet tomorrow night for her fifth year of live-drawing.  Five years ago she made Oscar history by being the very first cartoonist to draw while on the Red Carpet. She began posting drawings yesterday, and will continue posting today, leading up to her coverage of tomorrow night’s big shindig. Follow her on Instagram & Twitter: @lizadonnelly

Above: Ms. Donnelly yesterday on the mostly still-covered red carpet.

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Thurber’s First New Yorker Drawing

A Spill fave blog, A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker, takes a close look at the issue of January 31, 1931, which boasts James Thurber’s inaugural New Yorker cartoon appearance. Read it here.

According to Edwin T. Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography (Ohio State University Press, 1968), Thurber’s previous published drawing appeared in his college’s magazine,Ohio State’s Sun-Dial, March 1918.

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A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features during the week

The Daily Cartoon:

Ellis Rosen, Jon Adams, J.A.K., Chris Weyant, Trevor Spaulding

Daily Shouts: Ali Fitzgerald, J.A.K., Olivia de Recat (with Sarah Vollman)

...and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

 

 

Article Of Interest: Kenneth Mahood; Blitt On Trump’s State Of The Union Appearance; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Bliss & Martin’s “A Wealth Of Pigeons” Listed

Article Of Interest: Kenneth Mahood

From The Daily Cartoonist, February 4, 2020, by D.D. Degg. “Kenneth Mahood Is A Senior Stripper”

Mr. Mahood (shown above in a photo taken in 2013) contributed to The New Yorker from  1951 through 1996. Above center: a 1958 Mahood cartoon collection. Above right: a Mahood New Yorker cover, June 18, 1966. Below, his distinctive signature.

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Blitt On Trump’s State Of The Union Appearance

Go here to see the latest Blitt’s Kvetchbook. Mr. Blitt’s first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 2006.  His latest book, published in 2017, appears above. Visit his website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

J.A.K. on the Iowa Caucus results.  Mr. K. began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014. His latest book, shown above,  Everything Is An Emergency, will be out in June.

Note: Mr. K is also today’s Daily Shouts cartoonist: “Comments-Section Success Stories”

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Bliss & Martin’s “A Wealth Of Pigeons” Listed

The expected collection of collaborative  efforts from Harry Bliss and funny man Steve Martin is now listed on the MacMillan website.  Sorry, no cover yet. The book will be out this November from Caledon Books.

From the publisher’s site, a quote from Mr. Martin, followed by the the publisher’s description of the book.

“I’ve always looked upon cartooning as comedy’s last frontier. I have done stand-up, sketches, movies, monologues, awards show introductions, sound bites, blurbs, talk show appearances, and tweets, but the idea of a one-panel image with or without a caption mystified me. I felt like, yeah, sometimes I’m funny, but there are these other weird freaks who are actually funny. You can understand that I was deeply suspicious of these people who are actually funny.

So writes the multitalented comedian Steve Martin in his introduction to A Wealth of Pigeons: A Cartoon Collection. In order to venture into this lauded territory of cartooning, he partnered with the heralded New Yorker cartoonist Harry Bliss. Steve shared caption and cartoon ideas, Harry provided impeccable artwork, and together they created this collection of humorous cartoons and comic strips, with amusing commentary about their collaboration throughout.

 

 

The Weekend Spill; The Tilley Watch Online, January 27-31, 2020; Article Of Interest: Elizabeth Montague

The Tilley Watch Online, January 27-31 ,2020

An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who’ve contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Ivan Ehlers, Peter Kuper, Kim Warp, Brendan Loper.

Daily Shouts: Sofia Warren, J.A.K..

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Article Of Interest: Elizabeth Montague

From The Washington Post, February 1, 2020, “She is a black female cartoonist, and brings a ‘unique’ perspective to The New Yorker”

Here’s Liz Montague’s Spill entry:

Liz Montague New Yorker work: March 11, 2019–. Born December 15, 1995, attended University of Richmond class of 2018, former D1 track & field athlete, as of 2019 works as a digital storyteller at the Aga Khan Foundation in Washington, D.C. amplifying underrepresented narratives- Website: www.lizatlarge.org

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 3, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Cover: a snowy bridge. Read the Q&A with the cover artist here, and see the pretty digital snowflakes fall.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

In a throw back to earlier Monday Tilley Watches, I’ll take a quick tour through all the cartoons in the issue; a mostly text-driven drive-by of the work.

The first drawing, by David Sipress, references the recent demise of Mr. Peanut (is he really gone, or was it just a dream?). The topic of the late legume was recently covered here.

…Julia Suits’s pirate in cargo shorts on a gangplank is next (cannot see cargo shorts/pants on a New Yorker cartoon character without thinking of the below cargo pants drawing by the late great Leo Cullum — it appeared in The New Yorker,  August 17, 1998:

…The third cartoon (oh, alright: drawing) in the issue belongs to Barbara Smaller, who’s been contributing to the magazine since 1996.  A bedroom, a married couple, and a reasonable question.

…next is a Zach Kanin poker game (assuming it’s poker — I see chips on the table). I really like the three card players Mr. Kanin has drawn. The fellow to the left looks a little like Ernest Borgnine (with a pinch of Broderick Crawford tossed in?):

To me, the guy on the far right resembles Mandy Patinkin.

…next up: Liana Finck on an age-old flooring concern. Nice floating ghost.

…Harry Bliss and one of his collaborators (Steve Martin) address a potential problem for passengers on one of those floating mini-cities sailing the seven seas.

…five pages later: an Emily Flake drawing far far removed from her usual style and cartoon concerns. Think Hindenburg disaster mashed with social media done in a sort of Stuart Leeds style.

…on page 45, a Tersa Burns Parkhurst retirement party. Dunno why but the cartoon reminds me of MAD magazine’s Dave Berg’s “Lighter Side Of…” drawings (that’s a good thing!).

…on page 43 is a drawing by Mick Stevens, one of the most veteran artists in this issue.  He began contributing in December of 1979 (Roz Chast in this issue with a full page color Sketchbook, beats him out by more than a year– her first drawing appeared in June of 1978).  I wonder if the male dancing bird in Mr. Stevens’s drawing was originally in color. Either way (color, or b&w), a fab cartoon.

…David Borchart’s auto rental drawing (page 43) gets a Spill gold star for the use of the word “rassle.” Zeke, the fellow that’s prepared to rassle, is also mighty terrific.

…On page 54 is an Ed Steed drawing that at first glance reminds me of Zach Kanin’s in this same issue, but only because, in both drawings, the viewer is seeing a table front and center and from near precisely the same angle. Instead of card players (as seen in Mr. Kanin’s drawing) we have animated garden utensils and tools. They’re plotting something.

…next up is a Robert Leighton drawing of mountain climbers.  I love how Mr. Leighton has immediately tossed us into a situation that would normally demand the best possible equipment available. You gotta feel for the climber who came unprepared.

…Thoroughly enjoyed  — as usual with Lars Kenseth’s work — his drawing of campers situated down on the ground, and in much nicer weather than Mr. Leighton’s. Look at the care he took in adding the reflection of the moon on the lake.

…next up is a three panel hat x-ray drawing by Liza Donnelly ( who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982). This drawing answers the oft-asked question of what could possibly occupy all that beanie air space. Love the kitty!

Lastly, Adam Douglas Thompson (the most junior artist in this issue — his first drawing appeared in The New Yorker in the issue of April 8, 2019) gives us a sort of contemporary Chon Day drawing (it’s on page 68). “Sort of” because Mr. Thompson’s line and Mr. Day’s line have different flows.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

This man (Rea Irvin) is wondering what happened to his beautiful Talk masthead design (shown below). You know — the one that appeared in The New Yorker for 92 years, not the re-draw that’s been around since May of 2017.  Who took the iconic masthead away, and why, and where oh where can it be? Actually, the answer to the first question is easy. Perhaps the last question is easy as well.  It likely resides in a file on a desktop, easily accessed. The question of why is the puzzler. Read more about its disappearance here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Daily Cartoon: by Brendan Loper, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

…and a Daily Shouts by J. A. K., who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

 

The Weekend Spill: The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of January 13-17, 2020; A Note About Next Week’s New Yorker

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An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Brendan Loper (twice), Mort Gerberg, David Sipress, J.A.K.

Daily Shouts: Olivia de Recat & Julia Edelman, Emily Flake

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

To see all of the above and more go here.

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A Note About Next Week’s New Yorker

Oddly, the digital edition of next week’s issue (January 27, 2020) has appeared two days early. Although it’s out today, I’m going to stick to the usual Monday posting of commentary on the cartoons.

In the meantime here’s the cover, by Luci Gutierrez, and the line-up of cartoonists in the issue: