Thurber Thursday (Personal History); Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; More Spills: Solomon, JAK

Thurber Thursday

When I moved to Greenwich Village in late 1977, renting an apartment on West 11th Street, I’d no idea how near I was living to the once home of James Thurber — the fellow whose work brought me to the big city. In the photo above (thanks Google!) the grey and yellow-paneled modern building all the way to the right at 65 West 11th Street, was the location of Thurber’s home in the late 1920s (1928, according to  Harrison Kinney’s excellent Thurber biography, James Thurber: His Life and Times, Henry Holt, 1995). Thurber and his wife moved to West 11th from their Horatio Street apartment [anyone have an address for Thurber’s Horatio apartment? Neither Kinney nor Bernstein’s biographies have it]. The building that housed Thurber’s apartment was replaced by the New School’s Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts in the late 1950s.

Just past the yellow school crossing sign, at the corner of 6th and West 11th, there was a magazine store. It was at that corner, back in April of 1977, that I opened the latest issue of The New Yorker to see my name listed for the first time. Quite a moment. My apartment was on the other side of 6th, a few doors past what once was (the fabulous) Ray’s Pizza (Ray’s was on the NW corner of 6th and West 11th, street level in the red brick building you see beyond the yellow school crossing sign).

Years later I came to learn how many New Yorker folks lived on West 11th.  Here’s a close-up of the street from the Ink Spill map of The New Yorker’s New York, posted in 2013. I had some sliver of interaction with all of these folks, except, of course, Thurber, and Ross, who died before I was born. Peter DeVries “fixed” one of my earliest captions (he was, at the time I began at the magazine, a caption doctor); I lived in the same building as Donald Barthelme, in the apartment just above his; courtesy of Mr. Barthelme, I met, sat next to, and listened to Steinberg in the garden of the apartment building (as you see on the map snippet, he once actually lived in an apartment on the corner of 6th and West 11th); also courtesy of Mr. Barthelme, I spent some time chatting with Grace Paley at a Barthelme party; walked past S.J. Perelman on Carmine Street, but was too afraid (or intimidated, or whatever) to introduce myself. Just walking past him was experience enough.

________________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Adam Douglas Thompson on Waldo & distancing. Mr. Thompson began contributing to The New Yorker in April of 2019

 

_______________________________________________________________________

 

…From Submittable, March 18, 2020, “5 Literary Cartoons By Ali Solomon” Ms. Solomon began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018.

…From Believer Magazine, March 18, 2020, “The Coffee Isn’t Even Bitter: A Comic” by Jason Adam Katzenstein. Mr. K. has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2014.

Kenneth Mahood’s 1958 Cartoon Collection; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist (And Yesterday’s); Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Mahood’s 1958 Cartoon Collection: Not A Word To A Soul

Ordered not long ago (for one dollar(!), plus s&h) from a seller across the big pond, Kenneth Mahood’s 1958 cartoon collection arrived today and has been added to the Spill‘s cartoon library. Was very happy to see the dust jacket (and a protected dust jacket at that) in such great shape.  What I didn’t realize about this collection (until today) is that it is made up entirely of captionless cartoons, such as you see on the cover. From the inside flap copy:

“…the intelligent enquirer after knowledge today does not need a preamble of word or lengthy caption to point the humour…The pictures tell their own wordless story, with your intelligent help. The story is all there for you, and it is much better that way.”

Here’s Mr. Mahood’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

Kenneth Mahood  Born, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1930. New Yorker work: 1951 -1996. Mr. Mahood’s bio from the British Cartoon Archive.

______________________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Lars Kenseth, “A Celebrity Profile Of My Cat”

Mr. Kenseth began contributing to The New Yorker in

2016.  Visit his website here.

Further reading: this Spill piece on Mr. Kenseth from 2017.

And Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist was Ali Fitzgerald: “America!: How To Throw A Wild Presidents’ Day Party”

…See more of Ms. Fitzgerald’s New Yorker work here.

____________________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

J.A.K. on the 4 day work week.

Mr. K. began contributing to in 2014.  His book, Everything Is An Emergency: An OCD Story In Words & Pictures will be out this June from Harper Perennial.

Weekend Spill: “I Played Ping-Pong” With Thurber…The New Yorker’s Roger Angell Interview; John Cuneo Sketches A Cover On A Napkin; The Tilley Watch Online: February 10-14, 2020

Interview Of Interest: Roger Angell

From The New Yorker, this terrif interview of Roger Angell by Willing Davidson, a senior editor at the magazine: “Baseball, Fiction, And Life: Roger Angell’s Era-spanning Career At The New Yorker”

Left: Mr. Angell, wearing the hat, with another New Yorker era-spanner, Edward Koren

______________________________________________________________

John Cuneo Sketches A Cover On A Napkin

When I meet up with cartoonists here in the Hudson Valley it’s a rare thing for any drawing to be done. Most of the time — 99.999% of the time — is spent jabbering about all kinds of things. But — there’s always a but, right? — yesterday while sitting in a bakery/coffee joint with New Yorker colleagues, Danny Shanahan and John Cuneo, John began to describe a cover he’s working on for Michael Gerber’s fab American Bystander. As the fine tip Uniball pen often cuts to the chase quicker than the spoken word, John grabbed a napkin and within seconds ( a minute at most) drew the above. Hoarder that I am, I asked him if I could have it just as he was about to crumple it up, and then asked if he would sign it. Luckily, he was  agreeable-enough to both requests. I’ll run his sketch again side-by-side the finished piece once it appears on The American Bystander.

—My thanks to John Cuneo for sharing his napkin with the Spill. 

____________________________________________________________

The Tilley Watch Online

An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features,  February 10-14, 2020.

The Daily Cartoon: Amy Hwang, Ivan Ehlers, Kim Warp, Brendan Loper, Lila Ash.

Daily Shouts:  Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman), J.A.K. (with Harris Mayersohn),

…And:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

“Dinner Party” — A video with Marc Philippe Eskenazi, who was at one time an assistant in the cartoon department.

 

 

Liza Donnelly Returns To Oscar’s Red Carpet; A New Yorker State Of Mind: Thurber’s First New Yorker Drawing; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of February 3-7, 2020

Liza Donnelly Returns To Oscar’s Red Carpet

Liza Donnelly will be back on Oscar’s Red Carpet tomorrow night for her fifth year of live-drawing.  Five years ago she made Oscar history by being the very first cartoonist to draw while on the Red Carpet. She began posting drawings yesterday, and will continue posting today, leading up to her coverage of tomorrow night’s big shindig. Follow her on Instagram & Twitter: @lizadonnelly

Above: Ms. Donnelly yesterday on the mostly still-covered red carpet.

_______________________________________________________________________________

Thurber’s First New Yorker Drawing

A Spill fave blog, A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker, takes a close look at the issue of January 31, 1931, which boasts James Thurber’s inaugural New Yorker cartoon appearance. Read it here.

According to Edwin T. Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography (Ohio State University Press, 1968), Thurber’s previous published drawing appeared in his college’s magazine,Ohio State’s Sun-Dial, March 1918.

______________________________________________________________________________

A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features during the week

The Daily Cartoon:

Ellis Rosen, Jon Adams, J.A.K., Chris Weyant, Trevor Spaulding

Daily Shouts: Ali Fitzgerald, J.A.K., Olivia de Recat (with Sarah Vollman)

...and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

 

 

Article Of Interest: Kenneth Mahood; Blitt On Trump’s State Of The Union Appearance; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Bliss & Martin’s “A Wealth Of Pigeons” Listed

Article Of Interest: Kenneth Mahood

From The Daily Cartoonist, February 4, 2020, by D.D. Degg. “Kenneth Mahood Is A Senior Stripper”

Mr. Mahood (shown above in a photo taken in 2013) contributed to The New Yorker from  1951 through 1996. Above center: a 1958 Mahood cartoon collection. Above right: a Mahood New Yorker cover, June 18, 1966. Below, his distinctive signature.

________________________________________________________________

Blitt On Trump’s State Of The Union Appearance

Go here to see the latest Blitt’s Kvetchbook. Mr. Blitt’s first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 2006.  His latest book, published in 2017, appears above. Visit his website here.

_________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

J.A.K. on the Iowa Caucus results.  Mr. K. began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014. His latest book, shown above,  Everything Is An Emergency, will be out in June.

Note: Mr. K is also today’s Daily Shouts cartoonist: “Comments-Section Success Stories”

_______________________________________________________________________

Bliss & Martin’s “A Wealth Of Pigeons” Listed

The expected collection of collaborative  efforts from Harry Bliss and funny man Steve Martin is now listed on the MacMillan website.  Sorry, no cover yet. The book will be out this November from Caledon Books.

From the publisher’s site, a quote from Mr. Martin, followed by the the publisher’s description of the book.

“I’ve always looked upon cartooning as comedy’s last frontier. I have done stand-up, sketches, movies, monologues, awards show introductions, sound bites, blurbs, talk show appearances, and tweets, but the idea of a one-panel image with or without a caption mystified me. I felt like, yeah, sometimes I’m funny, but there are these other weird freaks who are actually funny. You can understand that I was deeply suspicious of these people who are actually funny.

So writes the multitalented comedian Steve Martin in his introduction to A Wealth of Pigeons: A Cartoon Collection. In order to venture into this lauded territory of cartooning, he partnered with the heralded New Yorker cartoonist Harry Bliss. Steve shared caption and cartoon ideas, Harry provided impeccable artwork, and together they created this collection of humorous cartoons and comic strips, with amusing commentary about their collaboration throughout.