The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 16, 2019

The Cover: Ivan Brunetti returns with a cat person/dog person cover. Read here what he had to say about the cover.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

I spend the wee hours of every Monday morning looking through the latest issue of The New Yorker (it’s posted online at around 4am). I look at every cartoon at least twice, then I close my laptop and think about the cartoons I just saw. The ones that stick with me — the ones I think about the most, are the ones noted here on The Monday Tilley Watch.  And so it is this week with these four (in no particular order):

Liana Finck’s (p. 40) umbrella drawing grabbed me immediately. It reminded me of an early New Yorker drawing by her published in 2014 (she began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013) titled Snow Falling On Accountants (I liked that one so much it’s now part of the Spill‘s collection of originals). The drawing has a 1970/1980s-era William Stieg-ian quality to it.

Roz Chast’s Wizard of Oz drawing (p. 54). I’m a fan of Ms. Chast’s outdoorsy drawings (like this one for instance).  I associate Oz with spectacular color (the film is black & white til Dorothy lands in Oz and opens up the door of her farmhouse). We’ve all seen enough of Ms. Chast’s terrif color work so that I can (possibly) be forgiven for imagining this drawing colorized.

The lead off drawing in the issue is by Adam Douglas Thompson. I like the simplicity of this cartoon — the way Mr. Thompson’s shown us exactly what we need to see, and no more.  Rats (and mice) have a long New Yorker cartoon history (here’s a favorite Sam Gross drawing from 1999).

David Borchart’s end of summer drawing (p. 39) is quite fab. Mr. Borchart, as he usually does in his work, gives us a world to think about. And, of course, the drawing itself is spectacular (note how the ferry leaves a wake).

Cartoon placement/sizing: All of the cartoons in this issue have been given good breathing room. A few examples: William Haefeli’s (p.31), Sharon Levy’s (p.59), and Lars Kenseth’s (p.22).

Rea Irvin’s Lost Masthead: Gone since the Spring of 2017, but not forgotten here.

 

 

 

Tilley Watch Online; New Yorker Cover Artists on Exhibit: More Hoff Hooplah

It was mostly Loper week on the Daily.  His work appeared Tuesday, Thursday and Friday (on Friday the drawing was co-credited with Evan Allgood).  The other two days saw work by Mary Lawton and Lars Kenseth.

Over on Daily Shouts, New Yorker cartoonists included Jeremy Nguyen (co-credited with Karen Chee), and Liana Finck (her continuing “advice” piece). 

Here’s a catch-all link for all the New Yorker‘s online Humor pieces

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New Yorker Cover Artists Work on Exhibit

From Rochelle News-Leader, January 27, 2018, “Cartoons, comics featured at Kish Art Gallery”

A group show of Chicago area artists includes work by New Yorker cover artists Chris Ware and Ivan Brunetti.

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More Hoff Hooplah from Attempted bloggery

Attempted Bloggery continues its focus on many things Hoff (Syd Hoff).  See it all here.

Website of Interest: A Cartoon & Comics Podcast Archive; Alex Gregory Nominated for an Emmy

VMThe New Yorker cartoonist (and snowman expert), Bob Eckstein recently told me about a blog, Virtual Memories loaded with interviews of cartoonists (as well as non-cartoonists). The section, “Comics & Cartooning” lists  such interviewees as New Yorker contributors  Sam Gross, Ben Katchor, Ivan Brunetti, M.K. Brown, Roz Chast, Peter Kuper and Jules Feiffer.  Here’s a link.  Enjoy!

 

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Of Note: New Yorker cartoonist Alex Gregory has been nominated (along with Peter Huyck) for an Emmy in the category of Best Writing For a Comedy Series.  Mr. Gregory writes for “Veep” …Congrats Alex!

 

 

 

 

Brunetti’s Memoir: Reviews and an Excerpt

aestcov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ivan Brunetti’s  Aesthetics: A Memoir  (Yale University Press) is receiving a number of notices.  Here’re a few:

 

 

The Comics Journal, June 18, 2013,

“Aesthetics: A Memoir”

 

USA Today, June 18, 2013,

“Cartoonist Ivan Brunetti Wants to Inspire You”

 

Artdaily, June 18, 2013,

“New Yorker cover artist Ivan Brunetti reveals the full range of his art, in Aesthetics”

 

From The Paris Review, June 12, 2013, this excerpt:

“Aesthetically Speaking”

 

And… here’s a link to a video book trailer via Youtube.

 

Additionally: here are a few words from Mr. Brunetti on the New Yorker’s website, speaking about his current cover.

R.O. Blechman Retrospective at SVA; Chicago Trib Printers Row includes Barry, Brunetti, Spiegelman, Ware

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From prweb.com, June 3, 2013, “Advertising Legend, Illustrator, Children’s Book Author, Cartoonist, Animator R.O. Blechman Has First Major Retrospective at 25th Annual SVA Masters Series”

Here’s a chance to see an incredible body of work by one of the greats (it’s somewhat amusing that the prweb headline (above in pink) is so lengthy for an artist whose forte is simplicity. But never mind).

There’re a number of R.O. Blechman New Yorker covers that would make it to an Ink Spill top ten list of all-time great New Yorker covers. One favorite — it adorned the issue of October 1, 1979 — appears above. His very first New Yorker cover appeared on the April 29, 1974 issue.

Link to Mr. Blechman’s website here

 

And…

 

From Drawn & Quarterly, June 4, 2013, “D+Q in Chicago part 1: Printers Row Lit Fest”

with word of appearances by Lynda Barry, Art Spiegelman, Chris Ware, Ivan Brunetti, and others.

 

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According to the release:

“The Masters Series: R.O Blechman” is the first major retrospective representing all three genres of the artist’s work: illustrations and editorial cartoons, animations and graphic novels. The exhibition is on view from October 2 through November 2 at the Visual Arts Gallery, 601 West 26 Street, New York City. Admission is free and open to the public.