Interview of Interest: Roxie Munro; Blog of Interest: New Yorker State of Mind; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; More Hef: Playboy Comedy, Comedians and Cartoons; More Bloggery

Interview of Interest: Roxie Munro

From the blog Smack Dab in the Middle, this interview with Ms. Munro who contributed some spectacular covers to The New Yorker, including the one above.

Link here to her website.

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Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker

An irresistible site if you love getting in the New Yorker weeds. As you can see the issue in the spotlight this week is dated August 4, 1928.  Cover by Julian de Miskey. Read it here.

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

And now back to the future…the Cartoon Companion boys, “Max” & “Simon” look closely at the brand new cartoons in the brand new issue of The New Yorker. Cartoons with salt, sharks, wax, thuggery, punch, groceries dissected.  Read it here.

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More Hef: Playboy Comedy, Comedians and Cartoons

Thanks to a Facebook post by Mort Gerberg yesterday I was alerted to this brand new book published in late August by Beaufort Books, Playboy Laughs: The Comedy, Comedians and Cartoons of Playboy.  According  to Mr. Gerberg, the book includes interviews with Arnold Roth, Jules Feiffer, Mike Williams, Don Orehek, Al Jaffee and Mr. Gerberg. 

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More Bloggery

Stephen Nadler over at Attempted Bloggery continues providing a look into New Yorker cartoon auction art and ephemera.  Today it’s sheet music from Murray Anderson’s 1929 Almanac (and an Arno Camel ad in the show’s Playbill). Scroll on down the post and you’ll see an auctioned Eldon Dedini original and an incredible horde of originals for a 1937 Macy’s ad campaign by Gregory d’Allesio.  Fascinating stuff all.  See it here

Rabbit At Rest: Hugh Hefner 1926-2017

Hugh Hefner, cartoonist turned mogul, died yesterday in California.  For quite some time his creation, Playboy Magazine was the alternate universe for a good number of New Yorker cartoonists.  Beginning in the late 1960s and early 1970s with other major cartoon markets folding, Playboy became the next best place for cartoonists to take their work;  the decision to bring one’s cartoons there was, for most, economic, not editorial.  Editorially, Playboy was definitely not the New Yorker (the best place to take one’s work) but it had in common with the New Yorker a number of elements attractive to cartoonists: the pay was good –second only to The New Yorker, and there was an orderly editorial system in place thanks to the steady presence of Michelle Urry, who presided as cartoon editor. Like the New Yorker, Playboy had a stable of cartoonists, some contracted with the magazine.  As a monthly, the decision-making process wasn’t as fast-paced as the weekly New Yorker;  the process further slowed by the need for all work to be approved by Mr. Hefner, the magazine’s founder and editor-in-chief, who wasn’t in the magazine’s headquarters in Manhattan, but out west, living his well- publicized Hollywood dream.

There was plenty of spill-over from the New Yorker‘s stable to Playboy‘s, especially in the back of the book, where single panel cartoons were most prominent (full color, full-page cartoons by Playboy regulars threaded through the magazine).  Hefner’s tastes in cartoons bore the stamp of his younger days; much of the magazine’s anchor material (those color pages) curiously kept that Eisenhower era look and feel well beyond the 1950s.

It was headline news when Playboy briefly ceased using cartoons (and abandoned nude photographs of women) but less newsworthy when both returned.  There is at this point in time no next best place for cartoonists to bring their work once it’s been rejected by The New Yorker.  Several eras of cartoonists were buoyed by Hefner’s magazine, itself a curio that perhaps could only have been dreamed up by a cartoonist.   

 

New Trailer & The Poster for Gahan Wilson: Born Dead, Still Weird

Born Dead poster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We recently told you that Steven-Charles Jaffee’s documentary “Gahan Wilson: Born Dead, Still Weird” will be shown in NYC this October — and now there’s a new trailer

 

The nearly two minute clip includes appearances by the one and only Hugh Hefner as well as The New Yorker’s current editor, David Remnick.

And now there’s a poster as well (above). Very exciting stuff!

Link to the film’s website here.

Link to some of Gahan Wilson’s work for The New Yorker here.