Late Notice: A Launch Party Tonight With Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell Live-Drawing; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 18, 2019; Some Thoughts After Seeing The Documentary Film, “Stevenson Lost And Found”

Late Notice: A Launch Party Tonight With Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell Live-Drawing

From the Facebook Invite:

Come celebrate the release of Sarah Dooley’s new book ‘Are You My Uber?’ which is a parody of the P.D. Eastman classic ‘Are You My Mother?’ Listen to comedians Sydnee Washington, Eva Victor, Larry Owens, Pat Regan, Marcia Belsky, Gabe Gonzalez, and Taylor Ortega tell hilarious stories of wild cab experiences while Hilary Campbell, the book’s illustrator, does live drawings.

Ms. Campbell began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017. Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A leafy Daily from Chris Weyant, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998. Visit his website here.

 

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The Cover: I see leaves. The fifth cover (below right) by Brigit Schossow.  Read a Q&A with her here.

There’ve been a lot, a whole lot, of leafy New Yorker covers, but this current one by Ms. Schossow  brought to mind (courtesy of a helpful New Yorker colleague) the beauty below left by the magazine’s former art & cartoon editor, Lee Lorenz.

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A scattering of thoughts about just a few of the cartoons in this issue:

P.C. Vey’s bear and couple in the woods (on page 33) made my day.

Something totally unexpected cartoon-wise is usually always good, and so it was coming upon a Jack Ziegler cartoon. Especially nice that the drawing is set in one of his favorite cartoon scenarios: a bar.

A fun Pete Mueller drawing (p.27).  Two Mueller drawings in two issues. Yay!

Ellis Rosen’s friend’s shower (p.56) is different. Like the choices of warm/cold and cold/warm.

Needed a ten second Googled refresher course with Liana Finck’s drawing (p. 60).  Not so much what her drawing means, but the meme’s origin (just curious, y’know).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Am hoping to open the issue one day and see Mr. Irvin’s iconic design has returned. No dice this week. For now, there’s that re-draw. Read about the classic Irvin Talk masthead here.

Here’s the real deal:

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Some Thoughts After Seeing The James Stevenson Documentary Film, Stevenson Lost And Found

A few random thoughts after attending last night’s premiere of Sally Williams’ fab documentary film, Stevenson Lost And Found.  There are are so many moments in the film — too many to go into here — that cartoonists and people who love New Yorker cartoons will treasure.

One instance I found particularly fascinating: the animated sequence showing what might go through cartoonists brains as they sit down and begin the day’s work. We’re shown a series of cartoons covering a wide variety of subject matter. It is, for this cartoonist, a relatable experience, as the mind careens through unlimited places every morning.

Another instance: in some eye-popping sequences we’re shown images of Mr. Stevenson’s children’s books lined-up, as well as Mr. Stevenson’s New Yorker  black scrap books (shown above) kept in the magazine’s library. These books contain every single signed New Yorker contribution by Stevenson, whether it’s his writing or drawing (including covers of course).*  Most of The New Yorker’s nearly 650 cartoonists (from 1925- present) have not had their work collected in one scrap book, let alone five. **

At the screening, I was lucky enough to be seated next to the legendary artist, Edward Sorel. During one of the sequences in the film where we are grasping the enormous amount of work Stevenson did (both published and unpublished) Mr. Sorel leaned over and said to me, “Do you feel as much like an underachiever as I do?”

In a perfect cartoon world, there’d be films such as Lost And Found for a number of the magazine’s artists. It’s heartening that there is already a Thurber film out there, and an Addams documentary in the works, as well as a film about George Booth.  But how about a Steinberg documentary, and one about Steig***?  I can dream, can’t I.  For now, we are quite fortunate to have this gem on Stevenson showing on the big screen. Go see.

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* I say “signed” because The New Yorker  did not and does not scrap book cartoon ideas handled by other artists. Mr. Stevenson, early in his New Yorker career, wrote a large number of captions for some of the magazine’s artists (read about his “secret job” here).

**Artists (and writers) without an enormous amount of work are scrap booked in alphabetically  cataloged books, along with other contributors.

***A short video accompanied the Steig exhibit that ran at The Norman Rockwell exhibit.

There is a 20 minute film about Edward Sorel available here.

A 40 minute Eldon Dedini film here, 

And a short film about C.E.M. (Charles E. Martin) here.

 

 

Photos Of Interest; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; More Spills…Chast, Campbell, Karasik

Photos Of Interest

If you link here to the photographer Deborah Feingold’s website you’ll find portraits of a number of New Yorker folks including Edward Sorel, John Cuneo, Barry Blitt, Loveis Wise, and Bob Staake.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Two million Trump bucks, by Jon Adams.  Mr. Adams has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Visit his website here.

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...here’s a recent interview with Paul Karasik (his first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 1999).

….Roz Chast and a former New Yorker editor will appear at NYC’s 92Y.  Info here.  Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978.

…If you like planning ahead, here’s a link to a Chast appearance in 2020.

…From The New York Times Book Review, posted November 8, 2019, A Graphic Review piece by Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell. Ms. Campbell began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

The Wednesday Tilley Watch: Trailer Of Interest: Stevenson Lost And Found; Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell & Peanuts; More Dana Fradon; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Trailer Of Interest…Stevenson: Lost And Found

Here’s the official trailer for the highly anticipated documentary film on the late great New Yorker artist & writer, James Stevenson: Sally Williams Stevenson: Lost and Found.  Link here to the official trailer.

From the film’s Facebook page:

Writer and artist, James Stevenson was one of The New Yorker Magazine’s most prolific cartoonists. Revered for its weighty commentary on world affairs, The New Yorker found its sweet side in the wit, whimsy and sheer joie de vivre of Jim’s illustrations and articles. Opening as the artist celebrates his 85th birthday, STEVENSON LOST & FOUND is a bitter-sweet romp through the stellar, 67-year career of a remarkable artist. An odyssey of discovery and loss the film unearths a truly dazzling volume of work, while facing, head-on, the dark and tragic struggles of the artist and those who loved him.
And here’s The Spill‘s A-Z entry for Mr. Stevenson:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 –. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time ideaman, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson has long been a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He is a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s recent book, published in 2013, The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, is essential.

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Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell & Peanuts

Here’s an excerpt on Longreads  from The Peanuts Papers (out October 22nd from Viking) featuring Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell’s contribution. Ms. Campbell has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Link here to her website.

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More Dana Fradon

From David Pomerantz’s Facebook post, October 14th (re-posted here with Mr. Pomerantz’s permission):

R.I.P. Arthur Dana Fradon.
This one especially hurts as I got to know Arthur a bit, spoke at length with him on the phone (he was sharp, funny and had some terrific stories), had many online exchanges with him (it was a big day if I could make him laugh with one of my little jests), and I hoped that I could make the trip to visit him in Woodstock or Connecticut with a few cartoonist friends. He was the very last contract artist that Harold Ross signed to The New Yorker, a few years after Arthur sold his first cartoon to the magazine in 1948. He was one of the most prolific of artists, selling about 1400 drawings over six decades until he finally retired to work on a novel. (He had some, uh, opinions about new Editor Tina Brown.) He was also a terrific satirical writer, the caption perfectly complementing his drawing. This was in a time (late 40s-mid-60s) when many of the contract cartoonists like Arno, Addams and Darrow, Jr. still worked with other writers’ captions, which eventually faded out when Lee Lorenz succeeded Jim Geraghty as Art Editor in 1973.

Arthur played baseball into his eighties and told Peter Arno biographer Michael Maslin, “I’m not really a cartoonist. I’m a misplaced baseball player or something like that.” I loved his work from when I first saw it in one of The New Yorker collections (he was quite proud of the fact that he had the most cartoons in one of the magazine’s retrospective books); when I mentioned to him how much I liked his “Good morning, beheaded” cartoon, he said that seemed to be the most popular of his cartoon prints sold by the magazine. Condolences to Ramona Fradon and their daughter Amy.

— Cartoon above by Dana Fradon, from The New Yorker issue of June 3, 1991

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Here a subpoena, there a subpoena, everywhere a subpoena —  by Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of September 9, 2019

The Cover:

It’s the Style Issue this week….thus the bountiful polka dots on Malika Favre’s eighth cover for the magazine. A Q&A with the artist here. If you link to the Q&A you’ll see the polka dot dress swirl.

I can’t see that many polka dots (and red) on the cover without thinking of Peter Arno’s March 23, 1935 New Yorker cover. It was also used as the cover for The Seventh New Yorker Album.

The dalmatians cover is perhaps overly familiar to me because it’s the front endpaper of my biography of Arno. Hey, what can I say? I like dogs…and Arno.

 

The Cartoonists and Cartoons

With the appearance of another team effort (third? fourth?) by Pia Guerra and Ian Boothby I think we’re in new territory as far as crediting a writing team goes for single panel cartoons in the magazine. Someone please correct me if there has been another duo credited beyond one or two appearances (Robert Crumb and Aline Kominsky-Crumb come to mind, but their work is in a different realm, i.e., their “thing” is not single panel cartoons). The duo of Guerra & Boothby have given us a slightly different take on the usual cartoonist’s representation of Noah’s Ark (the drawing appears on page 78). Instead of the long ramp leading up to the ark, it’s more of a tailgate.  It works well here.

Of note: Elisabeth McNair’s drawing of the tortoise and the hare (p. 72). If you remove the art hanging on the wall, and the door frame, the cartoon could easily be seen as descended from the school of (Charles) Barsotti minimalism. Love the turtle’s expression.

Also of note: Hilary Fitzgerald Cambell’s spooky “campfire” story-time drawing (p.49). At first glance I thought the scene was outdoors, but then saw the light sockets in the background with a charging electronic device (a phone?) connected to one of them. That it plays a trick on the eyes — intended or not — is pleasing, as is the drawing itself.

Further of note: Ed Steed adds another drawing to the cartoon canon of mounted something (in this case, someone) or others on the wall (p. 25).

Being the great grandson of bakers, and a fan of baked goods in general, it was a nice surprise  seeing pastries as a focus in Amy Hwang’s drawing (p. 43). Also a nice surprise: seeing Glen Baxter’s drawing (p.68). While a number of cartoonists box in their drawings, Baxter’s boxes somehow seem part of the drawing within, if that makes any sense (is the word “integral” — maybe, maybe not).

Rea Irvin’s Talk Masthead: Still not home. Read about it here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 29, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon; A Julia Wertz Daily Shouts; Fave Photo Of The Day

The Cover:  I see destructive tourists at the core of this cover, yet destruction doesn’t come up in Joost Swarte’s interview with The New Yorker‘s art director, Francoise Mouly.  Odd?

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Almost a theme issue, of sorts:  Amy Hwang (cats), Roz Chast (dogs), Farley Katz (flamingos), Joe Duffy (pigs), Kendra Allenby (deer), Frank Cotham (a snake), Shannon Wheeler (snails), Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell (a rat).

Steering briefly away from the Spill‘s focus, I have to note that Salman Rushdie’s piece in the issue  is titled “The Little King” and the accompanying illustration (by Nico Schweitzer) is a play on Otto Soglow‘s famous character. The illustration seems even closer to the toy Little King than the drawing of the King :

 

 

Applause for Bob Eckstein‘s shuttlecock drawing on page 48, and Ellis Rosen‘s heralded fellow drawing on page 42.

 

From the Department of fun coincidences. Liana Finck’s lifeguard drawing (p. 33) immediately reminded me of an obscure original Lee Lorenz drawing hanging here at Spill headquarters. The Lorenz drawing (its barely legible caption: “Help!”) was not in The New Yorker.  I’ve yet to figure out where it was published, or how old it is.  Mr. Lorenz, visiting here and seeing the drawing, could not recall where it had appeared or its vintage. It appears to be in an earlier Lorenz style (but not the earliest), so we can at least place in an early-to-mid 1960s time frame.

Ms. Finck’s drawing and Mr. Lorenz’s are in some ways opposites of each other. Mr. Lorenz’s beach is overcrowded, while Ms. Finck’s beach is empty.  Ms. Finck’s life guard offers help (if helped); Mr. Lorenz’s life guard is crying out for help. What ties them together, at least for me, is the graphic core of each drawing: the exceptionally tall life guard stand. Fine fun work by both. 

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead (below) left us in the Spring of 2017 after 92 years of service — it was replaced by a redraw.  Let’s hope the real thing returns before long.  Read about it here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon

Brendan Loper makes good use of oven mitts. Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

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A Julia Wertz Daily Shouts

“Conversations With Ma: Paint The Toenails And Board-Game Gripes” 

— A series? by Julia Wertz who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

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Fave Photo Of The Day

A crowd of folks who draw got together yesterday in Rhinebeck, New York.  Left to right: myself, Peter Steiner, John Cuneo, R.O. Blechman, Liza Donnelly, Bill Plympton, Danny Shanahan and Elwood Smith.